• Welcome to this forum Guest. We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

TEETH OUT AT THE CLINIC

D

DAVE BRICK

Guest
Cor Blimey, it was horrendous, That slow walk up Whitehead Road as if you were going to the gallows.
The terrifying wait until. . . . . they..called.. your.. name..out.
THE GAS MASK, forced over your mouth.
The dizzyness waking up and then..SPEW IT OUT..blood into the sink.
And the nurse forcing you to drink beaker after beaker of water to wash it out, and then, walking home, it's all over, and all you've got is a hole that you keep putting your tongue into.
 
K

Kate

Guest
The dentists here in Tasmania when I was a kid must have been sadists I reckon. Those drills! And the noise! And the injections were worse than the pain of going without. I still abhor dentists to this day. Although I've recently found a lady dentist here and it is amazing how gentle she is and of course her hands are a lot smaller so you haven't got a huge hairy fist jammed in your gob :)
 
D

DAVE BRICK

Guest
GOT TOLD OFF

Hey Kate, I used that word once on the forum, you know, that word, gob.
There I've said it now, well somebody told me off about it, I can't remember who.

I got brave once when I had to have gas and have a tooth out so I went on my own, without me Mom ! anyway they sent me back because I needed an adult with me. So, I had to walk the dreaded Whitehead Road twice.
 
R

RayD

Guest
First encounter....

I must have been between 7 to 8 years old when I had my first encounter with the "Dreaded Dentist".
Lived in a small village,(evacuee) which had neither a dentist or electricity.
A travelling dentist visited the village every 6 months or so.
He had to pedal furiously to drive the drill, just like you did the old sewing machines. :evil:
Wow :!: Can you imagine it :?:
The thought of it now sends shivers down my spine :(
My next encounter was with the Army dentist :evil:
No wonder I lost most of my teeth at a relatively early age........
:oops: :oops: :oops:
 
D

DAVE BRICK

Guest
NO I DON'T

More like torture gas, I never laughed once.
 

silhouette53

master brummie
I remember being taken by my mom to the dental clinic in Albert Road - along from the library. I remember at the age of six having TEN teeth extracted. Waking up after the gas, I was led by a nurse into a room with a long line of sinks, each sink had a child sitting in front of it washing their mouths out and crying after their ordeal. I was put to sit in front of one and added my own contribution to the wailing chorus. :'(
 
J

Jean

Guest
I had a front tooth filled without anaesthetic at the Albert Road clinic when I was about 12.  I remember being too scared to say my name and being shouted at, that dreadful stone sink where we washed our mouths out and then fainting from the pain afterwards.  Still had to walk all the way back to Vicarage Road.  Never went near a dentist for about 7 yrs after that. :(
 
K

Kate

Guest
I now go to a female dentist near home - bliss! She has not hurt me once! I can't believe it! She has small hands that don't choke me. I have never been to a dentist who is so gentle and aware that what they are doing may cause pain. My advice is seek out a lady dentist :) (Sorry guys)
 

Alf

Gone but not forgotten. R.I.P.
We had a Lady Dentist once for our Lads when young and her breath smelt terrible. :eek:
 

Rupert

master brummie
Wow, the one about the gas and being held down.... I remember it well. The horror of it all. better than the pounding toothache though. Afterwards! We used to go to a dentist in Sheep Street near Gosta Green I guess. Funny how that street always comes into mind when that movie The Runner with Dustin Hoffman comes around. The bad guy who used to be a dentist was played by Sir...(famous man ..darn) Anyway I will remember his name later. Ahh Larry Olivier. There.
Regards.
 
F

Frantic

Guest
As I used to go to Prince Albert School, I didn't have to walk "The Green Mile" Dave. We were just sent round the corner. The first part of the ordeal was the check-up, and you got a form to take home for signature, and it had either "20 minutes" or someting else that I can't remember now. It was like a code, but it didn't take long for us to figure it out so you always knew well in advance what was going to happen to you. I can still see 'THE CHAIR' and the dreaded 'MASK' and I can smell it and taste it even today, 50 yrs later. I'm with you Dave, I used to be terrified of 'The Clinic'. You never came out feeling better than when you went in, that's for sure. I remember at one time, I had to go there every day because I got athletes foot from standing on the wet floor in the cubicles at victoria rd baths, and the skin was coming off my feet in sheets. It was awful. To this day, I can't walk on a wet floor with my feet flat on the ground, I walk on my heels, even in my own bathroom. It's amazing how something like that changes your behaviour for life.
 

jennyann

master brummie
Staff member
The dentists and The Slade Road Clinic was our particular torture chamber! What a shock
going there for the first time for an extraction. They lined up at least ten kids to go into the chair one after another. I too remember the CHAIR, the TOOLS all laid out in front of your eyes and finally the MASK. ABSOLUTE TORTURE....Afterwards, the tortured ones would all line up at a "continuous" sink for a clean up which I won't go into. I can remember kids crying and being told off by the nurses in a rather brusque manner. Right cruel really.
 

rowan

Born a Brummie
I recall going to the dentist clinic at the top of Belchers Lane. From the previous postings
it seems that all school clinic dentists were torture places.

I use to dread the gas mask and struggled like mad against it. Being held down and seeing
the mask approach, was cause of many a nightmare!!!!!

I always seem to have the same dream under Gas and it was the terror of going up and down,
strapped in the dentist chair, at great speed. Horrible :'( :'( :'(
 

Sakura

master brummie
I know how you all feel, I am in the middle of getting a tooth capped and my dentist is not gentle. Have to go back another twice :'(

Not sure which hurts the most the drilling or the bill :eek:
 
D

dollyferret

Guest
do you also remember this house of terror on birchfield rd just before six ways,think his name was seimens
 

sylviasayers

master brummie
Dolly, do I remember that house of horror in Birchfield Road. In January 1959 I was 8 months pregnant and had raging toothache and this butcher of a dentist was the only one available, he extracted my tooth but I was still in agony, so my husband took me to the General Hospital Dental Department, it was found that the cavity had gone septic and they cleaned it up and stuck what seemed to be miles of gauze in the cavity, I was in so much pain I didn't know what to with myself, I ended up having to go to The General every day for about a week, the head dentist there hadn't seen anything like it, and asked me if I would mind his students viewing my treatment as they rarely saw anything like it. A few days later I gave birth, but if I had been more "with it" I would have reported him.
 

Linda Jennings

master brummie
As I used to go to Prince Albert School, I didn't have to walk "The Green Mile" Dave. We were just sent round the corner. The first part of the ordeal was the check-up, and you got a form to take home for signature, and it had either "20 minutes" or someting else that I can't remember now. It was like a code, but it didn't take long for us to figure it out so you always knew well in advance what was going to happen to you. I can still see 'THE CHAIR' and the dreaded 'MASK' and I can smell it and taste it even today, 50 yrs later. I'm with you Dave, I used to be terrified of 'The Clinic'. You never came out feeling better than when you went in, that's for sure. I remember at one time, I had to go there every day because I got athletes foot from standing on the wet floor in the cubicles at victoria rd baths, and the skin was coming off my feet in sheets. It was awful. To this day, I can't walk on a wet floor with my feet flat on the ground, I walk on my heels, even in my own bathroom. It's amazing how something like that changes your behaviour for life.
Hi
Re; the code you speak of, it was a capital D! I remember it well. It was for an extraction. Albert Road Clinic is responsible for frightening a whole generation of Astonian’s to fear the dentist!
Regards
Linda
 
Last edited:
Top