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TEETH OUT AT THE CLINIC

wendylee

master brummie
Our local school Dental Clinic was Harvey rd, yardley, I remember myself and my sisters sitting in the little waiting room to go in. I was around 6 and had to have 6 of my milk teeth out :eek: I remember the awful smell of the gas and sitting the small basin to rinse out ....I looked after my teeth after that haha
Wendy
 

jmadone

master brummie
Our local school Dental Clinic was Harvey rd, yardley, I remember myself and my sisters sitting in the little waiting room to go in. I was around 6 and had to have 6 of my milk teeth out :eek: I remember the awful smell of the gas and sitting the small basin to rinse out ....I looked after my teeth after that haha
Wendy
My first experience of visiting a dentist was at Harvey Road clinic. I can remember that horrible rubber mask and being held in the chair as it was clamped onto my face. Although I go for regular check ups now the memory of that first encounter has never left me and I still hate that dentist's chair.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
There were regular health and teeth checks when I was at an infants school and were carried out at the school. In 1945 there was such a school visit which coincided with my eight birthday and unknown to me a 22" wheeled bicycle had been purchased as a present for me by my Nanny. I think two or three of my primary (deciduous) teeth were removed. The bad news was that I was not allowed to ride the bicycle that day when arriving home as it was said that I could catch a cold (or some issue) with my gums as a result of losing the teeth. So a disappointing birthday, but tomorrow was another day and the new bicycle was extensively tried out. :laughing:
The interesting thing to me, when considered at a later time, was that the extractions were carried out at the school. No dentists clinics to be visited on those occasions as that was pre NHS and would have cost money.
 

ade

master brummie
My first experience of visiting a dentist was at Harvey Road clinic. I can remember that horrible rubber mask and being held in the chair as it was clamped onto my face. Although I go for regular check ups now the memory of that first encounter has never left me and I still hate that dentist's chair.
I woke up one morning with a tooth abscess, I was probably no older than 10 I reckon and that experience you've described there was exactly what happened to me, been forced back into the chair and the smell of that rubber Mask!!! I was already in pain with my face been twice the size and having some stranger pushing your head back into a chair was to much, there's no way they'd get away with that now, some of those old dentists were brutal, and like some of the teachers back in the old days I'm sure they got a kick out of it
 

Big Gee

master brummie
I too well remember walking 'The Green Mile' up Whitehead Road with Mom. As far as I recall, the dental staff were all women, the worst being a very stout 'lady' with bright red curly hair, and a surgical overall that went down to her feet. She was frightful, and very rough, and would shout at the poor, frightened kids - as I was, probably more frightened than the rest of them put together! After two terrifying visits my mother put her foot down and refused to allow me to attend that clinic. Instead, she got me into Mr Edwards on Witton Road, who was at least quiet and polite. To this day I still dislike the dentist, but at least with modern equipment and local anaesthetic the pain and discomfort is much reduced.

G
 

Linda Jennings

master brummie
I too well remember walking 'The Green Mile' up Whitehead Road with Mom. As far as I recall, the dental staff were all women, the worst being a very stout 'lady' with bright red curly hair, and a surgical overall that went down to her feet. She was frightful, and very rough, and would shout at the poor, frightened kids - as I was, probably more frightened than the rest of them put together! After two terrifying visits my mother put her foot down and refused to allow me to attend that clinic. Instead, she got me into Mr Edwards on Witton Road, who was at least quiet and polite. To this day I still dislike the dentist, but at least with modern equipment and local anaesthetic the pain and discomfort is much reduced.

G
Hi
The dentist or nurse with the red hair was indeed very rough and spiteful. It was a terrifying experience and has stayed with me all my life. Mind you I got my own back on her as I did kick her in the chops when she was trying to hold my legs down! It was horrendous. Then after the extraction sitting at a long sink with several other kids watching each other’s blood swim past. This is no exaggeration.

When I was about seven years old I had an eye test after having Measles. It took place at Coombes Opticians on New Town Row. When the optician put the testing frame on me to examine my eyes I started squealing. I thought he was trying to gas me!

Regards
Linda
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
oh gosh reading these posts i must have been very lucky to escape the horrors some of you had at the dentist...of course we had check ups at school but it was not until i was about 14 or 15 that i needed a couple of teeth out...well remember the nasty smell of the gas mask but to be honest i cant say as it bothered me that much...the dentist i went to was on the corner of farm st and villa st and to my amazement its still there to this day...at 16 it was suggested that as i had 2 small fangs at the top i would benefit from wearing braces i put my foot down on that one and took my chances...after about 18 months or so they straightened themselves up :)

lyn
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
mike it was a mr mahmood who was my dentist and i think his name was still on the building a few years back...street view shows his name has gone now...in fact the building has had a nice spruce up
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
Secondary school was where the dentist caught up with me ,the school hall was the designated examination room . A chair with cards on cards also on the floor . The visiting dentist can never be forgotten while examining your mouth I could see his tobacco stained teeth as he seemed to be grinning with mouth open . Then the dreaded words "take a card of the floor " that was it either an extraction or a filling dental at clinic Gt Charles St , after one particular extraction on a Friday morning my gum bled all night so much so I had a clot of blood at back of my mouth by my cheek . Dental hospital next call ,they removed the clot and I had to stick cotton wool swabs in between the hole and my cheek . Later on in life I developed an abcess which had to be removed at the dental hospital under gas, when the job was done coming round the dentist asked was I in a pub in my dream yes I answered , I thought you were he said you told me to get the fffffiiiiiin beer in under ananesthetic . What an embarrassment
 

wendylee

master brummie
Secondary school was where the dentist caught up with me ,the school hall was the designated examination room . A chair with cards on cards also on the floor . The visiting dentist can never be forgotten while examining your mouth I could see his tobacco stained teeth as he seemed to be grinning with mouth open . Then the dreaded words "take a card of the floor " that was it either an extraction or a filling dental at clinic Gt Charles St , after one particular extraction on a Friday morning my gum bled all night so much so I had a clot of blood at back of my mouth by my cheek . Dental hospital next call ,they removed the clot and I had to stick cotton wool swabs in between the hole and my cheek . Later on in life I developed an abcess which had to be removed at the dental hospital under gas, when the job was done coming round the dentist asked was I in a pub in my dream yes I answered , I thought you were he said you told me to get the fffffiiiiiin beer in under ananesthetic . What an embarrassment
It's a wonder any of us go back to the dentist year after year :confused:
 

Johnbell

master brummie
About 8 years old, taken to dentist just off Alum Rock, up Belchers lane a little way.9
Drilled and hit a nerve, or some very sensitive bit! I pushed him away and fled! Mom caught me outside with the napkin thing still around my neck and dragged me back in, i made so much noise he threw me out. The tooth had broken off in the melee and it stayed like that for the next 35 years. Next dental trip at age 43, most of them out, dentures, and never a ptoblem since . always pain free these days, and seemingly , nicer dentists!
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
I guess you get out what you put in as a dentist. Be uncaring and fringeing on the brutal, and the patient will be awkward, will scream the place down , and endeavour to hit you. Be caring and the job is done a lot easier. But I remember my Uncle Albert, only in his 40s when he died of a heart attack, always saying "Damned teeth - always a problem from the minute you're born till the minute you die". I remember his graphic descriptions every time he went to visit "that butcher", Mr Lacey. That put me off going to the dentist until I was in my 20s, and then followed another bad experince described elsewhere on this Forum.

Maurice :scream::scream::scream:
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
It's a wonder any of us go back to the dentist year after year :confused:
Wendy the point I forgot to mention last night was , I had to have a couple of fillings at different times , it seemed to me though the more they drilled in to the nerve after me grunting once or twice they still continued to bear down . Then much later in life dentist again , what a difference . I kept to the same dentist , no white coats shirts and trousers to put patients at their ease . I told him about my earlier experiences , he agreed that he'd heard the same story umpteen times , hence the casualwear he said we are trying to get away from that "nasty dentist appearance " . Needless to say nowadays it's not such an ordeal to go.
 

wendylee

master brummie
Wendy the point I forgot to mention last night was , I had to have a couple of fillings at different times , it seemed to me though the more they drilled in to the nerve after me grunting once or twice they still continued to bear down . Then much later in life dentist again , what a difference . I kept to the same dentist , no white coats shirts and trousers to put patients at their ease . I told him about my earlier experiences , he agreed that he'd heard the same story umpteen times , hence the casualwear he said we are trying to get away from that "nasty dentist appearance " . Needless to say nowadays it's not such an ordeal to go.
Oh it is more relaxing even in the waiting room....a little low background music and magazines scattered around.
Wendy
 

Mike Bond

master brummie
Reading all the threads relating to the School Dental Clinic I can truthfully say, BEEN THERE AND DONE IT.
When I played rugby for Sutton Coldfield one of my team members was a Dental Surgeon. He once said that it was the only profession where you spend all day meeting people who don't want to meet you, don't want to be in your company and who never want to see you again. Mike.
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
Reading all the threads relating to the School Dental Clinic I can truthfully say, BEEN THERE AND DONE IT.
When I played rugby for Sutton Coldfield one of my team members was a Dental Surgeon. He once said that it was the only profession where you spend all day meeting people who don't want to meet you, don't want to be in your company and who never want to see you again. Mike.
That's very true Mike , I've never thought of it like that
 

Mike Bond

master brummie
Hello Williamstreet,
The Dental Surgeon in question was a smashing bloke and he shared a seat with me on the coach from an away match. I thought it was a good one and it still makes me smile to this day. I wish I could say something like that that people would remember for the rest of their life. Regards, Mike.
 

suemalings

master brummie
I remember going to the School Clinic in Sheep Street. I don't remember a lot about the actual procedure but I do remember afterwards being put in a room with a row of small enamel sinks, each one with a child leaning over spitting! What a terrible experience. Next came the dentist in Alum Rock, that big leather chair and gas. Horrible. No wonder I was 16 years old before I plucked up the courage and went to see a lovely man called Dr. Gawthorpe by the Pelham. Ended up having to have must of my teeth drilled out, re-filled and two removed. (There was a "boutique" near by that was owned by a B'Ham City footballer, I remember buying a "cat suit" from there)
 

BOBJ

knowlegable brummie
I remember going to the School Clinic in Sheep Street. I don't remember a lot about the actual procedure but I do remember afterwards being put in a room with a row of small enamel sinks, each one with a child leaning over spitting! What a terrible experience. Next came the dentist in Alum Rock, that big leather chair and gas. Horrible. No wonder I was 16 years old before I plucked up the courage and went to see a lovely man called Dr. Gawthorpe by the Pelham. Ended up having to have must of my teeth drilled out, re-filled and two removed. (There was a "boutique" near by that was owned by a B'Ham City footballer, I remember buying a "cat suit" from there)
I attended the School Clinic in Sherborn Road, Balsall Heath in the late 50’s at about the age of 10. This was an old Victorian ex school building not far from home. This clinic delivered all sorts of treatment to the local poor kids, as you entered you were hit by two things, the sound of crying kids and the smell of Dettol. They treated kids with scabies and impetigo identifiable by purple patches all over them, kids with eye problems, with thick lenses and patches over one eye and kids with leg irons and pale skinny kids who went for Sun Ray treatment, there was also the dental clinic, where I was headed

The dental clinic was housed on the second floor of the large old building and was a most uninviting place. The patients would enter the reception area which was staffed by unfriendly “nurses” who took your name and told you to “sit down until your name is called”. The dreaded moment arrived when your name was called you then went alone into the surgery, no parents allowed. What a place this was, tiled floor, all white and chrome with all sorts of equipment and the Boyles machine for gassing you. “Sit here” said the nurse pointed to the chair and put a bib around my neck. Then I saw him, like something from a horror film, an unsmiling large fat man in a tight white overall, bald head and rimless glasses. He approached without a word and peered at me and then at a brown folder. He mumbled some technical instruction to the nurse who rearranged some instruments on a trolley. “open wide” said the ogre, as I did he pushed a cold Dettol smelling spring loaded metal clamp into my mouth, which was very uncomfortable, without a word or ceremony the gas mask was pressed to my face and the last thing I remember was the smell of rubber and throbbing in my head. I came around in another room, which looked like an ex toilet, with a row of sinks, over most of the sinks there were crying, bleeding children spitting blood and vomiting into the basins, I did the same and then after a while, staggered out to re-join my mother, little fuss was made and out we went for the walk home and salt water mouthwashes.
 
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