• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

St Peter's & St Paul's Church Aston Juxta

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
Josie it is just over the road from Aston Villa grounds. I used to live round the corner in Holte road. Jean.
 

josietrue

gone but not forgotten
thank you
i cant believe i only live a bus ride from there will go and have a look it looks lovely in side thank you
josie
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
This postcard is marked simply “Aston Church” - would it be the interior of St Peter & St Paul’s ? Very ornate interior. I notice a couple of hats perched on the choir pews to the left. Viv.

93FA0C31-1B54-42B1-AB58-AF172D563BBF.jpeg
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Many thanks Bewdley - some wonderful carvings on the pews in those interior photos. A church interior with lots of craftsmanship. Viv.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Very impressive church, lots of very fine craftsmanship to be seen. Presumably a pre-reformation foundation.
 

Big Gee

master brummie
The tower and spire date from around the mid-15th century, I believe, the remainder of the church dating from the end of the 19th century when it was extensively rebuilt due to deterioration. There are some very old effigies, tombs and monuments in the church, some belonging to the Holte family of Aston Hall. My parents were married there (by Canon Cole, I believe) in 1939, and I was christened there just after the War.

It is believed that there has been a church on this site since Anglo-Saxon times. Around 40 years ago my father, who was an electrician, did some wiring for the new vicarage in the grounds of the church. When its foundations were being dug, hitherto-unknown graves were uncovered, and my dad told me that some of these graves were examined by Birmingham University archaeologists, and dated to possibly Anglo-Saxon times.

I keep meaning to re-visit, but somehow have never got round to it. The last time my wife and I looked, it was locked, and I presume it still is most of the time. However, regular services are still held.

G
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Interesting details. Many ancient churches were subject to extensive rebuilding/alterations in the Victorian era. Some were sympathetic others not so.
 

Big Gee

master brummie
The worst crime in my opinion of some Victorian 'restorers' of ancient churches was to cover beautiful mediaeval wall-paintings. It's only in recent years that many of these have been un-covered, particularly in East Anglian churches. Evidently, the Victorians thought the paintings to be 'frivolous'.....

G
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Interesting point G, I have often thought the same, Victorian vandalism. I understand that Lichfield cathedral was painted or whitewashed inside too, but the Victorians cleaned it all off.
 

Big Gee

master brummie
The Puritans were also responsible for whitewashing the interior of many churches - they also thought that wall-paintings were a bit 'off'.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Did Victoria and Albert visit the Church in 1858 (when they visited Aston Hall)? This engraving shows a much less ornate interior in this section of the church where th Holt family memorials were held.

Viv.

5728657F-CD2D-43EB-A13B-97BD9271F668.jpeg
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
SS. Peter and Paul, Aston: Burials 1790 – 1793”....from Birmingham Libraries Iron Rooom
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Looking at post #36, seems to show a side chapel. It was probably for the Holte family and I have a feeling that beneath the square shaped tablet (on the left with two figures) could be a fireplace to keep them warm. Fireplaces in areas of churches for squires and landed gentry were common. The peasants had to freeze. :rolleyes:
Memorial tablets are a common feature in many churches - usually a tribute to those who often put most money in the pot to keep it all going - but personally I detest them. More modern churches usually manage without them or they are kept to a minimum.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
“... in a painted window of Aston Church, near Birmingham, is a coat-armorial of the Holts, baronets of Aston, containing the red hand, which is accounted for thus. Sir Thomas Holt, two hundred years ago, murdered his cook in a cellar, by running him through with. a spit; and he, though forgiven, and his descendants, were consequently obliged to assume the red hand in the family coat. The picture represents the hand minus a finger, and this is also accounted for. It was believed that the successive generations of the Holts got leave each to take away one finger from the hand, as a step towards the total abolition of the symbol of punishment from the family escutcheon.”

Book of Days. (1869)
 
Top