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St Giles Church Sheldon

mbenne

master brummie
St Giles Church, Sheldon

A 14th Century sandstone structure, the oldest part being the Chancel Arch which dates from the end of the 12th century. Further additions made in 1876. Stained glass by Ward & Hughes of London dates from the 19th-century restoration but also contains a 1937 window design by Florence Camm who's family's glass business was in Smethwick (T W Camm & Co). She studied at Birmingham School of Art.

Thomas Bray was the Rector 1690-1730. Established a school in Sheldon. Emigrated to America where he helped establish the Church of England in Maryland.

Masons Inscription in the tower was written in Middle English and reads...........

In [the] yr of our lord MCCCC I Xi [1461] ye
stepel a be gon. ye masson
had two and forti pond [42 pounds] vis [6 shillings] and
viiid [8 pence] for makyng of the stpel.

The last picture shows the above inscription.

Inside this is a wonderful time capsule, unaffected by the changes that have ravaged the surrounding area, sited opposite Sheldon Country park. Have read somewhere that the stained glass windows were regarded as 'unremarkable' but I disagree. Brings back memories of Church Parade with 298th 'A' scout group in the old green hut next door. The hut had no running water and our only supply was taken from a tap sited at the rear of Old Rectory Farm opposite.

Ps I would have posted this under 'Churhes' but didn't find a suitable thread - please feel free to move it if its in the wrong place
 

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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thanks for posting. Lovely church mbenne. The stained glass and the roof is beautiful. Viv.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
It looks like restoration has taken place, likely mid Victorian, (can't see much damp ;)) and whilst the windows look fine they are not outstanding, being Victorian for the most part. I wonder what the Camm window looks like because many modern ecclesiatical windows, done by recent artists, are quite remarkable. The reredos looks most interesting, I suspect it is original from the times when it was a Catholic church?
The church has a lovely warm look whilst maintaining a light airy appearance, the pews could be late 18th or early 19th. century but not easy to tell from a photo.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
it is a lovely church....i was in there a couple of years back while bell ringing was going on..friends of mine have a lot to do with the church

lyn
 

OldBrummie

master brummie
St Giles Church, Sheldon

A 14th Century sandstone structure, the oldest part being the Chancel Arch which dates from the end of the 12th century. Further additions made in 1876. Stained glass by Ward & Hughes of London dates from the 19th-century restoration but also contains a 1937 window design by Florence Camm who's family's glass business was in Smethwick (T W Camm & Co). She studied at Birmingham School of Art.

Thomas Bray was the Rector 1690-1730. Established a school in Sheldon. Emigrated to America where he helped establish the Church of England in Maryland.

Masons Inscription in the tower was written in Middle English and reads...........

In [the] yr of our lord MCCCC I Xi [1461] ye
stepel a be gon. ye masson
had two and forti pond [42 pounds] vis [6 shillings] and
viiid [8 pence] for makyng of the stpel.

The last picture shows the above inscription.

Inside this is a wonderful time capsule, unaffected by the changes that have ravaged the surrounding area, sited opposite Sheldon Country park. Have read somewhere that the stained glass windows were regarded as 'unremarkable' but I disagree. Brings back memories of Church Parade with 298th 'A' scout group in the old green hut next door. The hut had no running water and our only supply was taken from a tap sited at the rear of Old Rectory Farm opposite.

Ps I would have posted this under 'Churhes' but didn't find a suitable thread - please feel free to move it if its in the wrong place
 

OldBrummie

master brummie
Don't know the church well but I can claim a connection. My parents were married there 7th August 1937. The Rector at the time was Alfred William Waugh. The marriage was recorded as "Entry No 417 in the Register Book of Marriages of the said Church". I also attended services there as a member of the 298th Birmingham Scout Group.
Old Brummie.
 

Elmdon Boy

master brummie
I remember going to the scout hut by the side of the church in I think 1958 and joining the cubs.
I remember our troop joining a parade of cubs and scout marching from the corner of Cranes Park Rd and Church Rd to a fete in a field off Horseshoes Lane. There was the usual stalls in the field plus a model railway with a permanent track in it. You could have rides on the steam train.
That winter coming back from the cubs I was pulling a sledge with my mate on it on the corner of Church Rd and Common Lane by the shops and I slipped ending up smack on my face, blood everywhere. Result broken front tooth. Had it capped in the 70s. Still see it now.
My Mom and Dad bought me my uniform eventually from the scout shop at bottom of Corporation St near the Law Courts. A couple of weeks later I stopped going. Mum and Dad not to pleased.
 

OldBrummie

master brummie
A tad off the main topic but mbenne and Elmdon Boy we have a connection through the 298th. From memory my time there was in the Scout Group most likely between 1956 and 1958 and Mom was Akela.
OldBrummie
 

robert

master brummie
Myself and my brother and sister and my 3 daughters were all married at st Giles. The church had a reovation in the 70s i believe.
 

mbenne

master brummie
A tad off the main topic but mbenne and Elmdon Boy we have a connection through the 298th. From memory my time there was in the Scout Group most likely between 1956 and 1958 and Mom was Akela.
OldBrummie
Just writing something up on 298th - will post later....
see
Scouts Girl Guides Brownies
 
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mbenne

master brummie
Link to description from the British Listed Buildings site...

https://www.britishlistedbuildings....-church-of-st-giles-sheldon-ward#.WlvMjFSFgW8

I September 1948 there was a service to commemorate 250 years since the founding of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. After the service the Company visited the nearby Rectory which was built in 1696. I wonder what condition its in now?
I think this relates to Old Rectory Farm, referred to as the Rectory ,is still there and serves as the tea room for the country park. There was also a Sheldon rectory (which i've seen referenced on this site) and this was demolished in the 30's for housing development.
 

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mbenne

master brummie
It looks like restoration has taken place, likely mid Victorian, (can't see much damp ;)) and whilst the windows look fine they are not outstanding, being Victorian for the most part. I wonder what the Camm window looks like because many modern ecclesiatical windows, done by recent artists, are quite remarkable. The reredos looks most interesting, I suspect it is original from the times when it was a Catholic church?
The church has a lovely warm look whilst maintaining a light airy appearance, the pews could be late 18th or early 19th. century but not easy to tell from a photo.
The 15th c rederos was damaged in the reformation and moved to the North aisle during renovations. The rederos in the picture is from 1912 - closer viewRederos.jpg
 

Spargone

master brummie
cmag005.jpg
The Rev. Douglas Strickland multi-tasking! Church/Scout fairs on Saturdays at the church hall were asked to be mindful of weddings taking place in the adjacent church. This couple must have decided it was easier to join in than compete!
 

badpenny

Deleted Upon Request
There was supposed to be a rare round window which was boarded up to prevent it being damaged
during the time of the dissolution.
 

Spargone

master brummie
The Rev. John March, curate at the time, thought that the various features of the church were worth highlighting so he created a son et lumière event. It meant removing spot lights and the dimmer board from the church hall and setting up a temporary PA system. That was the first time that I heard Ralph Vaughan Williams' Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis and every time I hear it I am reminded of that event and John. He lived in one of the old school cottages.
 
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