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spitfire

norfolk brummie

gone but not forgotten
John (coalman). You should be working at Duxford. About the only time that I was on my own was while looking at the Spitfire in question.

I asked a member of staff where it had been built, and I was told "Castle Bromwich". Still, with Birmingham's contribution in WW2, I would still feel proud to label a few things MADE IN BIRMINGHAM.

Many thanks for your correction.

To my buddy John in the USA, Thanks for the compliment. Lakenheath is still going very strong John. I believe that it is the biggest permanent USSAF base outside the USA. Eddie
 

MichaelG63

Brummie babby
When anyone mentions the Spitfire someone with invariably say 'the Hurricane shot down more enemy aircraft'. What they don't mention (or don't know) is that there were only 19 squadrons of Spitfire compared to the Hurricane's 30, so if you adjust the figures to take that into account, the Spitfire had the higher kill rate. Here's the relevant information, but the whole site is worth a look.

https://www.rjmitchell-spitfire.co.uk/battleofbritain/roleofthespitfire.asp?sectionID=8
 

coalman

master brummie
Hello,

Pleased to attach a photo of an original Modification plate which you would find on most of the sub assemblies of the Spitfire built at Castle Bromwich, such as the fuselage ( one on the firewall and one in the cockpit), wings, flaps, tail unit and tail planes, this particular one is from the Firewall behind the merlin engine.
The 2nd plate is one that you would find alongside the Modification plate on all the same places, I found an original one ( please see photo 3)some years ago then last year I located the original manufacturer who was still in business and could still produce them all to the original specification, so I had them put back into production and has proved a popular item.

CBAF 15 Mod plate 1.JPGCBAF label 1.JPG04-05-2013 17;05;46.jpg

Hope the above is of some interest

Regards

John
 

coalman

master brummie
I am sure there was a plaque at the original entrance which was unveiled by Alex Henshaw back in the 1990's which was then moved into the factory when the entrance was updated, as I was there watching the spitfire flyover the factory which itself was built there in 1944.
So is it the same plaque or a different one?
Its a shame that the person who is rebuilding a spitfire in Birmingham which served with 19 squadron being flown in the battle of Britain was not invited to put on a display of it.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Sorry, Coalman, I think I've misled readers. The plaque is to mark the centenary of 19 Fighter Squadron which formed at the site rather than the Spitfire itself. Although 19 Squadron was the first to receive a Spitfire in WW2. So I assume then there are two plaques now at the site; one celebrating Spitfire history, the other celebrating 19 Squadro, going back to RFC days. Viv.
 
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Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi viviene
did you know that the last of the 12,000 spitfires flew of the production line at castle bromwich factory in 1946
, it was numbered pk 726,
alan ,, astonian;;
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
No didn't know that Alan. My main interest in Castle Brom is that my dad was in the RAF (he was a flight engineer on Lancasters in WW2 and was very familiar with Castle Brom) but something my aunt told me after he passed away has baffled me for some time. According to her, after the War, he worked for Nuffields (she said it was hush hush work) and I wondered if it was anything to do with the factory at Castle Brom and the Cold War. Never managed to track anything down in connection with Nuffields, although family myths can sometimes turn up interesting info (or could of course be complete balony). I do wonder what was the role of factories like that at Castle Bromwich immediately after the War. Viv.j
 
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Di.Poppitt

master brummie
We live a hop skip and a jump, as the crow flies, from Duxford and ocasionally a spit flies over the house,
they are such beauties and one once gave us a wag of its wings as it flew over.

During the war my mother worked at a small engineering factory where they they riveted the canopies ready for them to be fixed to the 'plane. She inspected canopies to make sure the rivets were all as they should be. A few weeks ago we watched a program where a spitfire was being restored, suddenly someone had a rivet from the canopy in his hand, I didn't hear too much what they said because I was yelling to my husband 'look, look, one of mom's rivets'
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
DURING ONE OF BIRMINGHAM,S THREE ZEPPLIN RAIDS , BOMBS WAS DROPPED IN FIELDS BETWEEN FOX HOLLIES ROAD AND SHIRLEY ROAD
IN FEBUARY 1916 , 35 PEOPLE , INCLUDING THE LADY MAYORESS OF WALSALL , WERE KILLED WHEN WHEN NINE ZEPPELINS PENETRATED INLAND ,
MISSED BIRMINGHAM , AND DROPPED BOMBS ACROSS PARTS OF THE BLACK COUNTRY.
WALSALL,S WAR MEMORIAL IS LOCATED AT THE SPOT WHERE SHE DIED.

THE BIRMINGHAM SMALL ARMS COMPANY [ BSA ] SUPPLIED LEWIS GUNS ,TO THE BRITISH ARMY.
PRODUCTION INCREASED FROM 30 GUNS PER WEEK IN 1914 TO 2,OOO PER WEEK BY 1918.
US ARMY COLONEL ISSAC NEWTON LEWIS DESIGNED THE AUTOMATIC MACHINE GUN
BEST WISHES TO ONE AND ALL ALAN;; Astonian;;
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
We sometimes rent a cottage just at the end of Ladybower Reservoir in Derbyshire. A couple of years ago (maybe more) two Spitfires flew over followed by two Lancasters. They were on their way back from a flying display. Amazing!
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
LadyP, there are only 2 flying Lancasters left in the world, the Memorial Flight Lancaster and one based in Canada, some time ago the Canadian one visited this country and they did fly together so you were very lucky to see a rare sight, probably will never happen again. I was fortunate enough to fly in the last Lancaster Squadron in the RAF 82 Squadron 1949 to 51 in Africa , and that is were the Memorial flight Lancaster came from. Eric
 

Smudger

master brummie
THE BIRMINGHAM SMALL ARMS COMPANY [ BSA ] SUPPLIED LEWIS GUNS ,TO THE BRITISH ARMY.
PRODUCTION INCREASED FROM 30 GUNS PER WEEK IN 1914 TO 2,OOO PER WEEK BY 1918.
US ARMY COLONEL ISSAC NEWTON LEWIS DESIGNED THE AUTOMATIC MACHINE GUN
BEST WISHES TO ONE AND ALL ALAN;; Astonian;;
As someone who knows nowt about engineering, i find it fascinating how in WW1 they fired their machine guns through the propeller, & If it ever went wrong?
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Hi Eric, yes, we were very lucky indeed. Although our 'landlady' had something to do with the luck. We have always gone into Buxton on Sunday afternoons but she popped round to say that the planes were coming over and we should stay around. We got our chairs positioned in the garden which overlooked the dam and watched the Spitfires fly up the Derwent Valley. Then came the Lancasters which flew very low over the reservoir, circled over us, back down the valley and repeated the run. Wonderful. I realise how lucky we were to see both together and as you say, this may never happen again. I shall tell my brother, who was with us at the time, that you flew with that squadron. He's due for a postcard so will write it tonight.
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
Smudger, that has also intrigued me, I thought if the timing goes wrong you shoot of your own prop, and how do they account for increased RPM of the prop when you open the throttle? Like you I have no tech knowledge so do not know the answer. Eric
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
LadyP, I should hasten to add I was not a pilot merely a wireless operator but flew over 2000 hours in the Lancaster, I loved them. Eric
 
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