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Curzon Street Railway Station

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
In the current edition of RAIL there are articles on HS2 and Curzon Street and also the planned development of West Midlands railways based on Birmingham hub. If you cant find it and would like a copy let me know.
Bob
 

Heartland

master brummie
The work on digging up the concrete of the former parcels depot continues. It will interested to see if anything is buried under ground such as the hydraulic system that drove the capstans.

Looking at the Aris's Gazette report, this records the final completion of the line between Denbigh Hall and Rugby. The line to Birmingham ( it was not called Curzon Street station at first, at least in timetables) as stated was in April The first passenger service is recorded to have run on April 9th 1838 from the original station at Rugby, calling at Brandon, Coventry, Hampton and Birmingham. During November 1844 booking huts and platforms were erected at Dockers Lane, Marston Green and Stechford Gates, short trains having called at these spots from October 1844.
 
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DavidGrain

master brummie
That would be the northside of Curzon Street which was the original station for the Grand Junction Railway from Liverpool and Manchester. The London and Birmingham Railway's station, which came a few months later, was the building we know on the southside of Curzon Street. I can remember driving along Curzon Street and bumping over the level crossing between the two sides. This level crossing was unusual as Birmingham City Council banned all level crossings within the city boundary.

The two railway companies amalgamated to form the London and North Western Railway but continued to use the two stations until New Street Station was built.
 

Heartland

master brummie
The level crossing was to the Top Yard, where there were a series of goods shed and a stable block.

In the two above images for the Grand Junction Frontage, there is to be seen at the end a square building which was the hydrualic engine house.
 

Heartland

master brummie
Yes the frontage of the Grand Junction Station in Curzon Street is also shown in Osbornes 1839 Guide to the GJR.

The image shows the unloading of goods at the station. Later a larger goods establishment was created at Duddeston/ Vauxhall, where the locomotive shed was also placed. The LBR loco shed was near the Digbeth Branch Canal and there was also separate railway and canal interchange for both GJR and LBR.

CSGJR.jpg
 

ChrisJB

New Member
I am researching the Duddeston Viaduct. I cannot establish whether it was the intention of the Birmingham & Oxford Junction line to cross over the existing L&BR lines from London, assuming they were at a lower level than there are now, to connect with the GJR towards Vauxhall, or whether some form of junction was to be created (the levels make this look difficult) linking directly into Curzon station. The extension to the proposed New Street had not yet commenced c 1846. so no suggestion of joining the L&BR main line. Anybody have any info on this? Thanks.
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
I have been puzzling over this for some time. The GWR line appears to be coming into the L & B line at right angles. All that we have written on the subject that I have seen is that the intention was to bring the GWR into Curzon Street Station but whether it was into the L & B station or into the GJR station is not clear. I am sure that the intention was never to form a junction facing north as that would mean the the GWR would not have had a Birmingham station. However, the New Street line is further south than the Curzon Street line so I suppose there could have been room for a curve. Train speeds were slower in those days and Locos would have been smaller and carriages 4 wheelers so a tighter curve would have been possible.

Since typing the above I have found this entry in the catalog of the Parliamentary Archives. This states that the junction was intended to be with the GJR so crossing over the L & B

Birmingham and Oxford Junction Railway.
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To see this item in our search room please contact us: [email protected]
 

ChrisJB

New Member
The construction pre-dates the GWR; the viaduct was built by Birmingham & Oxford Junction Rly, though the GWR had sole rights to use it subsequently (and took over the company later). Also, New Street was not in existence, only being planned after the creation of LNWR. I will go to the Parliamentary Archives, maybe there are plans available. I am also thinking that the viaduct was to carry the line over the existing main line. The present main line into New Street is also on viaduct, which suggested otherwise, but I am guessing then that the lines were at the same level as Curzon Street station ie much lower.
 

Heartland

master brummie
It is difficult to see now, but on an 1839 engraving, there was a plaque on the roof of the London & Birmingham Station building that had the name London & Birmingham Railway;
LBR1.jpg

Similarly at Euston, the name was engraved into the building;

LBR2.jpg
 

neil324

knowlegable brummie
The Woodman pub outside this station is going to really well once HS2 is complete.

My mother and father used to drink in it in the early 70's.
 

neil324

knowlegable brummie
Well the Woodman only has to wait till 2026 for the HS2 station to open !

Of course this assume no delays in the building of HS2, or even the cancellation of the project !

The value of the land and business has all ready gone through the roof, so if the owner gets bored waiting they can cash their chips to someone willing to wait.

They won't cancel. To far ahead, all land purchased, compensation paid. There is a massive hotel down the road from Curzon street station that was built in 2005 being pulled down to make way for the track.
 

neil324

knowlegable brummie
Or, regrettably , their is always the possibility of a mysterious fire

If the land was needed for HS2 the government would have just issued a compulsory purchase order. Quiet surprising really the pub is right outside the stations doors, I would have thought they might have knocked it down just to make the space more open.
 

Heartland

master brummie
Yes the Woodman was popular with those staff that worked at the Parcels Depot. In the mid 1970's the depot probably had the largest of number of staff. There were 3 shifts for the railmen Most worked on the deck, but there were also shunters signalmen, yard supervisors, shunt engine drivers and the various clerical staff. One of the gatehouse men was Dan Sweeney, who liked the odd drink in the Woodman.
 

Bob Johnson

master brummie
If the land was needed for HS2 the government would have just issued a compulsory purchase order. Quiet surprising really the pub is right outside the stations doors, I would have thought they might have knocked it down just to make the space more open.
The "Vesting papers" have been issued to property owners as far as Birmingham. This means the "vested properties" now belong to H.M gov or it's agents.
 

neil324

knowlegable brummie
The "Vesting papers" have been issued to property owners as far as Birmingham. This means the "vested properties" now belong to H.M gov or it's agents.

I assume you mean all compulsory purchase orders have been issued.

My post you quoted was just saying there was no need to burn a building down. The government does not need to do that.
 
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