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Sayings, legends and customs.

Nico

master brummie
No snow here mate ! I've arranged for an airdrop of special hairnets though !
I was thinking of you and your hairnets yesterday. I battled to the supermarket against the wind which finally stopped me in my tracks on the bypass. A chap bent down to pick up a dog end, which he put in his mouth, and the wind toppled him over. Walked back with the blizzard behind me as I had been for a swim. So I was warm by then. Have about 2 inches of snow in old money here.
 

nijinski

master brummie
Here's some sayings but I don't know where they're from. Does a bear s**t in the woods, does a one legged duck swim round in circles, up the creak without a paddle or even barking up the wrong tree.
 

Shortie

master brummie
My mother used to say 'For two pins' as in 'For two pins I would give you a hard slap' - does anyone know where that came from, and what kind of pins?? Baffling, that one.
 

Shortie

master brummie
I remember that, too Nick, it meant quickly (I love that saying to be honest, it's quite sweet) , but 'for two pins' beats me as to the meaning.
 

Nico

master brummie
Great Grandad said I am told, I am gooin' to the church weer they 'ave 'ondles on theer prayer books. (the pub). Nan said leg 'o mutton sleeves. And tree pot hats. What she used to wear and what her granny used to wear. Grandad used to say one and I can't remember it but it was about a man with a flat 'at, who dropped it and was searching in a field of cow pats for it. Can anyone jog my memory please? Nico.
 

nijinski

master brummie
My mother used to say 'For two pins' as in 'For two pins I would give you a hard slap' - does anyone know where that came from, and what kind of pins?? Baffling, that one.
Hi shortie. A packet of pins were cheap to buy so two pins were worth next to nothing. Meaning it wouldn't take much to slap you hard. Regards nijinski
 

Nico

master brummie
My cousin is just learning to walk after in illness I said "steady past yer grannies"
My Dublin friend's family would say, to make your self at home, 'you're in yer grannies, or your on yer granny's yacht.'
Or can you pass me the yoke, (the watsit) we had a conversation this week, My partner having to guess what dad used to want, the watsit, thingummy, Nan said, doo daa and oo jar capivvy, I never had to know how to spell it before.The Dublin granny said for what little boys have and little girls don't, his dicky doo daa day.
 

Spargone

master brummie
Has no-one posted 'going around the Wrekin', (or variants)?

"All around the Wrekin", "Right 'round the Wrekin" or "Running round the Wrekin" is a phrase common in Shropshire, Worcestershire, Staffordshire, Herefordshire, the Black Country, Birmingham to mean "the long way round", in the same way that "round the houses" is used more widely " Wikipedia

Outside of this region no-one would have a clue what that means!
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Older fishermen, in the days of smacks in particular, would not put to sea if they saw a clergyman on their way to the quay. (Quay here meaning the area more than one quay). Furry congers was always spoken of rather than the furry burrowing critters more well known as ra**its, crossed brooms were an extreme cause for bad luck or problems and no boat was ever painted green.
Curiously some French fishermen had different ideas as most of the trawlers from Dieppe were green at the time.
 
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