• Welcome to this forum Guest. We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Sayings, legends and customs.

S

Stitcher

Guest
I have unearthed a battered little booklet with short paragraphs on each page about our best loved or strange traditions and the like. Would any members be interested in me posting a few of the best ones.
stitcher
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
bgfd.jpeg
I never thought there was any other reason for this other than for us to play and dance to when we were youngsters.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Really interesting Stitcher. I love to find out where these commonly used phrases came from. People use them and don't generally question what they originally meant. I found that when my children were younger they'd ask why people used a certain phrase and I had no idea how to explain where it originated from. (Also think there was a problem with my Birmingham and Yorkshire ancestry mixed in there too - poor darlings!). Totally agree - more if you have any please! Viv.
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
I thought in Birmingham we used the phrase 'Ta rar a bit'; Icertainly remember go to the 'pop' shop on Aston Cross to get my Mom's canteenof cutlery back a few times.
 

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
Am enjoying reading what these phrases mean Trevor. I remember a friend who always said on departing See you Anon. Jean.
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
They appear to be pages from a small book because they are numbered and some of the writing carries onto another page so I will have to sort through them and put them into some sort of order.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
S

Stitcher

Guest
dsw.jpeg
I have found page one, well it's page three really but it is the lowest number page I have.
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
When I was a tiddler I remember rushing to Highters Heath Junior school, terrified of being late. You'd always hear other kids shouting "'urry up, it's five and twenty ter nine".

I've never heard twenty five said that way since, (except in Germany of course). Does it still crop up ?
 

sylviasayers

master brummie
I watch Countdown most afternoons and there is a short spot where Susie Dent explains the origin of popular words and phrases I will try and remember a few and post them here.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
I can remember "Five and twenty to nine", or similar . I think i have heard it recently, but not sure exactly when.
 

carolina

master brummie
Christopher Winn has wrote some books - a couple being 'I never knew that about London' and also 'I never knew that about England'. In the books apart from the facts 'I never knew that...' he also gives insights into some phrases and sayings.
 

Shortie

master brummie
Well Maypole Baz, I still say it that way - not perhaps all of the time, but I use it fairly often. People do comment sometimes, but I don't even know I am saying it. My granchildren think it is funny - at least they give me funny looks. I guess I do it because my mother did. I only say it when referring to time, not when I am counting or anything like that. I think I have a tendency to say twenty five past, but five and twenty to. Must get my husband to make a note!
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
I have put most of the pages in order and it seems this was a small booklet entitled 'A Stiff Upper Lip'. Here is the next one.
vxb.jpeg-----vfte.jpeg.
 
Top