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Milk

Spargone

master brummie
I was advised by a young Yorkshire girl on how to make perfect Yorkshire Pudding. Always use sterilised milk the less water content the better and make the mixture at least 24 hours before and keep it in the fridge. Beef dripping in oven till it is on the verge of smoking. IT WORKs.
The water content of sterilised milk shouldn't be any different than that of pasteurised milk. The main difference is that sterilised milk is heated for longer and the milk sugars are partially caramelised. Sterilised milk was an early form of homogenised milk, i.e. no cream layer on top, typical of bottled pasteurised milk in the time we are taking about. Perhaps that was what made the difference?
Batters should be allowed to stand for at least an hour to allow the proteins and starches to absorb water.
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
The water content of sterilised milk shouldn't be any different than that of pasteurised milk. The main difference is that sterilised milk is heated for longer and the milk sugars are partially caramelised. Sterilised milk was an early form of homogenised milk, i.e. no cream layer on top, typical of bottled pasteurised milk in the time we are taking about. Perhaps that was what made the difference?
Batters should be allowed to stand for at least an hour to allow the proteins and starches to absorb water.
My Aunt Florrie had a farm just outside Builth Wells that I spent a lot of time at. She made Yorkshire pudding and cakes with milk from her creamery, the best EVER! No stera or past just REALLY good stuff!
 

mw0njm.

Brummie dude
The estate here had 1500 jersey cows for a while but went back to holstein Friesian cows....... Of the two breeds, Holsteins produce more gallons of milk per lactation than Jersey cows. During their lifespan, the average Holstein yields 23,000 pounds of milk. That is roughly 9 gallons of milk per day.

Jersey cows
1654583482477.png
a milk machine:grinning:
1654583943699.png
 

Terence David Lines

master brummie
The estate here had 1500 jersey cows for a while but went back to holstein Friesian cows....... Of the two breeds, Holsteins produce more gallons of milk per lactation than Jersey cows. During their lifespan, the average Holstein yields 23,000 pounds of milk. That is roughly 9 gallons of milk per day.

Jersey cows
View attachment 170720
a milk machine:grinning:
View attachment 170721
When I lived in Jersey. I would drink between 4/6 pints a day of Jersey milk depending on how hot it was.
 

Vivienne14

Kentish Brummie
Re Yorkshire puddings. My Yorkshire Nan made a flat, unrisen version of Yorkshire puds which filled a plate (like a pancake). They were given a good covering of light gravy and were eaten before the meat and veg part of the meal. I gather this is the traditional style of pud and she would most certainly have used regular milk. She’d have been horrified that mum had sterra milk deliveries. And in her mind: “no need to make those small fluffy, airy things, just start the meal with a good plate-size pancake to stretch out the meat”! Viv.
 

Vivienne14

Kentish Brummie
Question: does Milk Street have any connection with milk ? How did it get it’s name ? In the past was it dairy grazing land ? Was it traditionally where milk was processed ? Was it a dairy farming area perhaps ?

Phyllis Nicklin photographed it in mid-1953 showing the junction with Little Ann Street (left) but she left no clues about its history. There seems to be little written about it. Viv.

C09ADEA1-FCBF-4C50-9FE1-6EBA0317189B.jpeg
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Re Yorkshire puddings. My Yorkshire Nan made a flat, unrisen version of Yorkshire puds which filled a plate (like a pancake). They were given a good covering of light gravy and were eaten before the meat and veg part of the meal. I gather this is the traditional style of pud and she would most certainly have used regular milk. She’d have been horrified that mum had sterra milk deliveries. And in her mind: “no need to make those small fluffy, airy things, just start the meal with a good plate-size pancake to stretch out the meat”! Viv.
Indeed, those round things, full of air, are a travesty. i see no resemblance of them to a proper Yorkshire pudding.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
According to Carl Chinn , "The streets of Brum 3", it was originally called Rope walk (presumably because there had been a rope walk there) ,ran through fields and did not go as far as Deritend High St. the name was changed between 1750 and 1778. The relevant part of the 1750 map is below. So probably the idea of it coming from milk production is likely to be the answer

part of Bradford's map 1750.jpg
 
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