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Kalamazoo

Richardweetman

New Member
Hi all, hope ur well.
Posting on behalf of parents Steve & sue weetman ( maiden name sylvester) worked in the printing department for 30years from the 1960s if anyone remembers them please say hi
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Hi Richard, hopefully someone remembers your parents. Meanwhile if you have any memories that your parents have passed on to you about working at Kalamazoo please record them here. This is a great place to record those memories and I know others will be interested.

Viv.
 

Dave89

master brummie
Hi,

I remember using a Kalamazoo Wages system at R. Whites in the early 70s.
It consisted of a large board with pegs along the top, and a 'skirt' of payslips
used with a journal sheet. I'm sure it had other features like cash analysis for
the pay packets and for bringing forward the individual employees' totals for
the year, but the details now escape me. I do remember it seemed to work
very well, and of course, it was all hand written.

Kind regards
Dave
 

Hort6030

New Member
Another Kalamazoo marriage here :)

Both of my parents worked at Kalamazoo, they met there and then got married.

My father was Packing Manager if I remember correctly, my mother was a company nurse. I still have my father's 50 year service watch from Kalamazoo.

Malcolm Horton and Heather Horton. My father passed away about 6 years ago, mother still going strong. Oddly enough, only a couple of months ago I went to the funeral of another Kalamazoo ex employee who was really good friends with my father.

I went there once for a family open day when I was a kid, and again for his retirement party. It was so strange seeing where my father worked as you didn't do that sort of thing back then.

I remember lots of my father's memories of the place. I remember there was a guy who used to put things on his desk in a precise order every day, and they used to move them to annoy him. I also remember hearing about a guy who dressed as a woman (each to their own), but this was quite the story back then.

My father kept in touch with a few of them until he died.

Great memories to recall, and lovely to have somewhere to share them.
 

Pedlarjak

New Member
I was a salesman for Kalamazoo in the early 1970's - London North 'A' branch. I have excellent memories of all the manual business systems we sold - Wages, Indexing, Accounting, Analysis, Minute Books, Personnel Records, Stock Control, and many more. Some were based on 3-in-1 writing systems - the 'pegboard; detailed in a previous post - some on visible edge card systems, others on strip-index. The Kalamazoo name originated from them having the early rights to sell a 'thong' binder called the Kalamazoo binder - named after the home town of the US company that made it (Reynolds & Reynolds I believe their name was). I've found this forum while researching for a book I'm trying to write - I'll let you know if it ever happens.
 

Dave89

master brummie
'thong' binder called the Kalamazoo binder - named after the home town of the US company that made it (Reynolds & Reynolds I believe their name was)
Hi Pedlarjak,

That brings back memories of working at the Westminster Bank in the early 60s.

Our handwritten ledgers used those thong binders, and the thongs were I think
like webbing about an inch wide with the mechanism that tightened them in
the front cover. You loosened/tightened the front cover for adding/removing
sheets with a little silver crank handle rather like some old clock keys, which you
inserted into the edge of the thick black moulded cover.

Happy days - not!!

Kind regards
Dave
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Thank for the reminder - we had those at Birmingham City Transport Accounts Office too in the 1950s.

Maurice :cool:
 

JonnyH

proper brummie kid
I worked at Beeches Management Centre in the late 90's after Kalamazoo aquired it from Cadburys. At that time they were mainly concentrating on software packages for the motor trade and used Beeches for training and residential for their regional sales people.
 

Malcog

proper brummie kid
Another Kalamazoo marriage here :)

Both of my parents worked at Kalamazoo, they met there and then got married.

My father was Packing Manager if I remember correctly, my mother was a company nurse. I still have my father's 50 year service watch from Kalamazoo.

Malcolm Horton and Heather Horton. My father passed away about 6 years ago, mother still going strong. Oddly enough, only a couple of months ago I went to the funeral of another Kalamazoo ex employee who was really good friends with my father.

I went there once for a family open day when I was a kid, and again for his retirement party. It was so strange seeing where my father worked as you didn't do that sort of thing back then.

I remember lots of my father's memories of the place. I remember there was a guy who used to put things on his desk in a precise order every day, and they used to move them to annoy him. I also remember hearing about a guy who dressed as a woman (each to their own), but this was quite the story back then.

My father kept in touch with a few of them until he died.

Great memories to recall, and lovely to have somewhere to share them.
I met my wife in the 72 building in 1976, I worked at Kalamazoo until 1986, happy days.
 

taylor

New Member
THese May bring back memories for those who worked at Kalamazoo. These are dated 1973. Viv.
This Kalamazoo thread is interesting Viv, as my parents both worked there. Mom, Freda Taylor of Selly Oak worked in accounts before W.W.2. and met my Dad, Frederick Neale who was an electrician. They were both much into sports and the Kalamazoo teams. Dad was a keen footballer then later a cricketer playing for the first KCC team. Before the war they bought the house at Rednal where they lived until Dad died. Through the war Dad was in a reserved occupation and was working in Halesowen and Mom left the company to have my brother Keith. Dad returned to Kalamazoo in 1945 and worked his way through the ranks to become the main electrical engineer under Jack Trigg and retired in 1972. For all his years at Kalamazoo he was on call and I remember as a lad going to the factory with him on many occasions day and night, fascinated with the machinery, and meeting some of his friends, Les Ecclestone, one I remember. He also did electrical work at the Directors homes, Tom Moreland I think lived near Barnt Green and his wife fed me whilst Dad did the jobs. I remember the Company as a family, many employees friends through the sports or other company activities and whenever I visited with Dad they always made me welcome. Happy Days.
 

Blarem

New Member
Hi I was just reading this thread! Does anyone on here remember a women called hilda harten that worked there!? She was my nan and she always mentioned it when I was a kid! And she also mentioned that my grandad done a single (music track) and they used to play it from time to time on the factory floor, I would love to try and find out more!
Thanks lee
 
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