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Fire Brigade Information

Radiorails

master brummie
I a not sure if this is on BHF (other than a post by me today in the Hobbies thread). It shows Birmingham Fire Brigade, in 1926, at an inter station competition held at Handsworth Park.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Aggie that photo (post 84) brings back memories for me - of being setup! You will now that dummies, though sometimes heavy, were not too difficult to pick up and carry, mainly as they were rigid and gave little resistance. I took a crew to a first aid training evening, given by very professional army folk and not the often used volunteers of the SJAB or Red Cross.
After all the medical advice and training, about two hours, we came to rescue talk. I was 'selected' to demonstrate the fireman's lift, but not with a dummy but very alive young woman! It was a couple of minutes before I was able to achieve my task. The young woman was obviously well trained to play the part of an almost lifeless person, virtually like a limp lettuce leaf!! I was applauded, but have to say that the episode probably resembled a flamenco or similar. It was made more difficult for me not wishing to handle her proclivities and other sensitive areas. ;)
 

aggie2347

master brummie
Aggie that photo (post 84) brings back memories for me - of being setup! You will now that dummies, though sometimes heavy, were not too difficult to pick up and carry, mainly as they were rigid and gave little resistance. I took a crew to a first aid training evening, given by very professional army folk and not the often used volunteers of the SJAB or Red Cross.
After all the medical advice and training, about two hours, we came to rescue talk. I was 'selected' to demonstrate the fireman's lift, but not with a dummy but very alive young woman! It was a couple of minutes before I was able to achieve my task. The young woman was obviously well trained to play the part of an almost lifeless person, virtually like a limp lettuce leaf!! I was applauded, but have to say that the episode probably resembled a flamenco or similar. It was made more difficult for me not wishing to handle her proclivities and other sensitive areas. ;)
Carry down was a bit of a challenge to some.I will see if I have a picture of a carry down to illustrate the point.
 
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Radiorails

master brummie
Carry down was the worst I will see if I have a picture of a carry down to illustrate the point.
From the 1970's live carry downs were only done on basic and specialist training where I was. An Everest harness had to be attacked to the 'victim'. Other carry downs were usually dummies. For added safety it was advisable to pair people well, a ten stone guy trying to carry down a fifteen stone one was always risky. :worried:
 

aggie2347

master brummie
Live carry down from a 50ft Wheeled Escape which we had to do in the 60s the only restriction being that the person being carried down should not exceed 14 stone. Other than that you were expected to pick up the casualty climb out of the window and bring the casualty down the Escape to ground level without safety equipment. I thinkScreenshot_20191116-182415_Photos.jpg the FBU were instrumental in bringing in the safety harness
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Live carry down from a 50ft Wheeled Escape which we had to do in the 60s the only restriction being that the person being carried down should not exceed 14 stone. Other than that you were expected to pick up the casualty climb out of the window and bring the casualty down the Escape to ground level without safety equipment. I thinkView attachment 139199 the FBU were instrumental in bringing in the safety harness
That was so when I did my basic in 1965. I managed to always avoid being No.4 in a four man pump drill - you know the poor devil who had all the running with bust lengths, adding lengths etc. I can laugh now but at the time I had pity for poor guy as it seemed he always managed to be No. 4. I guess he was not quick enough in the fall-in. :laughing:
 

aggie2347

master brummie
Another piece of Fire Service Equipment that put the wind up me was scaling the Drill Tower by Hook Ladder everything seemed to rest on the Hook maintaining a purchase on the window ledge which sometimes slipped back a fraction and gave you a fright. Screenshot_20191116-183517_Photos.jpgA comrade of mine fell from the 3rd floor still strapped to the ladder. Its use was justified because rescues had been made via Hook Ladders in narrow spaces where conventional ladders could not be deployed. Having said that some men loved them and would scale to the top of the Drill Tower some 100ft with impunity. The FBU got them withdrawn in the late 60s
 
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