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Film cameras

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Yes, I do recall that Kodak did try with the digital format, but used their own format which just did not go down well.
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
My first 'proper' camera (after a box camera) was an Agfa Isolette 3 bought in Hong Kong in 1953 whilst in the RAF, later pawned when I was a bit short of cash ! I believe there was no colour film at the time, just black and white, still have my albums of Singapore and Hong Kong but all black and white pics. Eric
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Eric, is this what was called a reflex camera or was it twin lens reflex ? you looked down through the top for the viewfinder. You you remember what size film it took?
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
I can't remember too much about it but yes you looked down through the top, it took I think 127 or was it 125 film, prints were tiny, only about 1.5 inches square
I used it quite a lot in the Suez Canal Zone whilst on national service from 53 to 55.
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Yes, 125 sounds right. The negative may seen small then, but it was large enough to give you a very good quality postcard sized print.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Way back in 1973 three of us went on a business trip to Japan and our hosts gave each of us a camera. Through the 1970s 1980s and into the 1990s I took all my photos with this camera. I've just taken it out of the jumble in the drawer pic I posted in #8 and now photographed it with a phone !

I have to admit I have forgotten how to use the film camera but I still have the manual.
cameraIMG_0163.JPG
 

farmerdave

master brummie
Seem to remember that Press photographers in the 1950s nearly always used Rolleiflex twin-lens reflex cameras. I think that the camera used 120 roll film which gave two and a quarter inch square negatives. These negatives could give enlarged prints of extremely high resolution. Dave.
 

farmerdave

master brummie
Way back in 1973 three of us went on a business trip to Japan and our hosts gave each of us a camera. /QUOTE]

The Japanese have always been very keen on photography. I once took a group of Japanese businessmen on a short tour of central London. They were taking occasional photographs until we got to the statue of Eros at Piccadilly Circus. I told them that this had been regarded as the Hub of the British Empire. They went crazy. Aaah "Hub of British Empire!". They had to have a record of this and every camera was furiously clicking. Dave.
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Eric, thanks. The landscape looks familier to some photos my dad took durin WWII, I know he travelled along the Suez Canal too.
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
Not sure about that, it looks different and seems to be loaded on a barge, maybe a replacement for the wrecked one.
The earlier (damaged) one was built by the Brits during WW2.

Our workshop at El Kirsch was a former railway workshop with tracks and repair pits for the trains.
At Moascar we didn't have any worshop buildings we worked out in the open, chain link fence used rolled out on the ground to stop sinking into the sand.
 

farmerdave

master brummie
I bought this Minox 35 MB film camera in 1988. It is very small, measuring 4 inches x 2.5 inches x 1 inch. The film ISO can be set from 25 to 1600 but usually I would use either 100 or 400 ISO films. Aperture could be set from f 2.8 to f 16 and distance could also be set from 0.9 metres to infinity. I don't think there is a speed setting. I used it mainly for landscape photographs, preferring an SLR for portraits. Dave.
P1000449 (2).JPG
 

farmerdave

master brummie
This is a one-chance only photograph. It was taken at the Queen Mother's funeral on 9th April 2002 using a Canon AE1 SLR, a 800 ISO colour film and a zoom lens. It shows left-to-right Prince Andrew, Charles, Philip, Anne and Edward. It was taken in the Mall. Dave.
P1000001.JPG
 
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