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Essence Of The 50s And 60s

Maria Magenta

master brummie
Maria, I'm sure this was by Avon. It was their range for girls. My mom had a lot of similar cream pots from Avon. I can remember Topaz, Honeysuckle, Wishing, Occur and Birds of Paradise. I thought they were so exotic! :D

Yes, it was! I remember most of those names, but not Birds of Paradise. Wasn't there one called Rapture? And a man's cologne called Rugger, or am I imagining that?
 

lmr3103

master brummie
Yes, it was! I remember most of those names, but not Birds of Paradise. Wasn't there one called Rapture? And a man's cologne called Rugger, or am I imagining that?
Yes Rapture was another. Can't remember Rugger, there might have been but my Dad only ever wore Old Spice! There was also a cream pot called Somewhere. They also did all the fragrances in lovely talc dusting bowls but unfortunately they were a bit pricey for us!
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Not long ago my cousin was telling me about the starlings (she worked in the Council House) and how wonderful it was. She was under the impression that they were culled to get rid of the nuisance. Shame.
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Wonderful video Pedrocut, I love that part of the coast. I understand that the Somerset levels also experience the same thing.
 

devonjim

master brummie
Only just come across this thread, lots of nostalgia! Cliff Mitchelmore and Jean Metcalfe were certainly a feature of Sunday lunch times.
 

mbenne

master brummie
Freeze dried Surprise peas.Just seen these and reminded me of the ones made by bachelors. Seems they still have their own version in NZ
 

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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
It's really interesting to read everyone's memories of the 1950s/60s. I too look back with nostalgia on the 1950s, but for me I think time has clouded over what was really going on in my family home. Not sure whether this was how it was for others, but my 1950s were a bit odd. My dad found it difficult to show affection. Don't really know why, maybe it was generally how men were or maybe it was because of his WW2 experiences.

Or maybe my dad was just very old-fashioned and didn't see the need for showing affection or for frivolous spending. From memory he never bought us anything. My mum put it down to him being 'tight' as she called it. But maybe he was careful and thrifty. He wasn't short of money by any means. But I suppose, because he'd provided the roof over our heads, he thought his job was done. At the time, I simply thought this was typical of most other families. Was this the same for others ?

Whereas my mum was the complete opposite. She was a very caring mum who worked exceptionally hard all her life. She went out of her way to get us everything she could. I don't ever remember going without, far from it. She was definitely part of the newer movement of working women. And whether by choice or by need, she certainly enjoyed what she did and moved wholeheartedly into the 1960s.

Needless to say, my mum struck out for independence and they eventually divorced. This was a very unpleasant process in the 1970s. But in time she found her independence.

Shall now replace my rose-tinted specs !!!

Viv.
 

Ray T

master brummie
It's really interesting to read everyone's memories of the 1950s/60s. I too look back with nostalgia on the 1950s, but for me I think time has clouded over what was really going on in my family home. Not sure whether this was how it was for others, but my 1950s were a bit odd. My dad found it difficult to show affection. Don't really know why, maybe it was generally how men were or maybe it was because of his WW2 experiences.

Or maybe my dad was just very old-fashioned and didn't see the need for showing affection or for frivolous spending. From memory he never bought us anything. My mum put it down to him being 'tight' as she called it. But maybe he was careful and thrifty. He wasn't short of money by any means. But I suppose, because he'd provided the roof over our heads, he thought his job was done. At the time, I simply thought this was typical of most other families. Was this the same for others ?

Whereas my mum was the complete opposite. She was a very caring mum who worked exceptionally hard all her life. She went out of her way to get us everything she could. I don't ever remember going without, far from it. She was definitely part of the newer movement of working women. And whether by choice or by need, she certainly enjoyed what she did and moved wholeheartedly into the 1960s.

Anyway, it certainly made the person I am today. Viv.

Hello, Viv, yes, I also grew up through the 50s with a somewhat cold father and a warm mother. I think there was a definite problem in those days with men showing emotion. Things seem to have improved a bit nowadays, anyway.

Regards, Ray T
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Hi Ray. So I'm not alone ! It certainly changed how I raised my own family. I was determined to create a warm and caring family for my own children. And hopefully I haven't made any major mistakes along the way. Viv.
 

nickcc101

master brummie
Hello Viv. My Mother and Father divorced when I was six months old so my Mother had a tough time bringing my sister and myself up. Fortunately my Father was a partner in a Scientific instrument manufacturing company so the family house was part of my Mothers settlement. I never realised that money was extremely tight until I had to jump from 2nd year to 4th year at School as my Mother found it extremely difficult to keep a growing lad, so off to work at 14 was the order of the day. To be honest leaving School was the happiest day of my life.
 

Maria Magenta

master brummie
I had a very "hands on" father, which is odd because he hadn't known his own. He had a couple of uncles who were role models, I think, and a grandfather. One of the uncles taught him to play the piano.
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
Hello Viv. My Mother and Father divorced when I was six months old so my Mother had a tough time bringing my sister and myself up. Fortunately my Father was a partner in a Scientific instrument manufacturing company so the family house was part of my Mothers settlement. I never realised that money was extremely tight until I had to jump from 2nd year to 4th year at School as my Mother found it extremely difficult to keep a growing lad, so off to work at 14 was the order of the day. To be honest leaving School was the happiest day of my life.

My childhood at home was OK, my upbringing was a bit strict but there was no harm in that.
The trouble with my bit of the 50s was that my schoolteachers were allowed to batter us kids to their heart's content. Some of them should have been jailed for their cruelty but it's too late for that now.
Leaving school was one of the happiest days of my life too.
 

Smudger

master brummie
My childhood at home was OK, my upbringing was a bit strict but there was no harm in that.
The trouble with my bit of the 50s was that my schoolteachers were allowed to batter us kids to their heart's content. Some of them should have been jailed for their cruelty but it's too late for that now.
Leaving school was one of the happiest days of my life too.
My Dad never showed affection but i still loved him. Mom on the other hand spoilt me rotten, as i was the youngest ( I did have a younger sister but she died ) And i agree with maypole baz about teachers. Some were good & others were downright nasty. The headmaster at my school was really nasty, he would turn you around & knee you up the backside. I told my uncle ( who was recently back from the Korean war ) & he went down to the school & gave the headmaster a taste of his own medicine, but he still abused the kids for any slightest thing. I hope he`s rotting in hell.
 

Big Gee

master brummie
At primary school in the 1950's discipline was strict, but physical punishment quite rare. Not so at grammar school up to the early 1960's. There, one or two of the teachers (we had to call them 'masters') were notorious for handing out physical punishment for even minor breaches of discipline. I was once on the receiving end of a powerful slap across the face, and when I had the opportunity I went to see the headmaster, who listened politely but did nothing. He more or less told me to 'man up', as the expression is these days. I too couldn't wait to leave school, but funnily enough as time went on I began to miss it.

G
 

Elmdon Boy

master brummie
My Dad also showed very little affection or emotion Viv, but he wasn't over strict in fact he was fairly easy going. If he was angry with you it was because you really had misbehaved. My Mum was the disciplinarian in our household and certainly could fly off the handle for the slightest misdemeanour. I have two sisters one older and one younger. Although parents arn't supposed to have favourites, and they never said so, it is fair to say my younger sister was my Dads favourite, whilst I was my Mums favourite.
When my Mum was in one of her bad moods, casting a black cloud over the house, and everyone feeling like they were walking on eggshells, they would send me into the kitchen where she would be quietly smouldering, to pacify her. My usual ploy was to put my arm around her, and because I was taller than her in my teenage years I would look down on her and say "What's up Mum" with a little shake. "Don't try to get round me"she would say looking up at me, "Aw Mum" I would say giving her another little squeeze, at which point she would start laughing. Job done, tension broken. I was the only person in the house that could do that.
Both parents were stricter with my two sisters than with me. I could get away with murder ,especially in my late teens I could almost arrive home at night at any time, whilst strict curfews for my sisters. Even my older sister had to be home earlier than me, and she is 2 1/2 years older than me. This led to her saying "why could stay I out later" to which the reply was "but he's a boy".
For all there faults, and haven't we all got some, I loved them to bits and had a happy childhood. I so miss them
 
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jmadone

master brummie
It's really interesting to read everyone's memories of the 1950s/60s. I too look back with nostalgia on the 1950s, but for me I think time has clouded over what was really going on in my family home. Not sure whether this was how it was for others, but my 1950s were a bit odd. My dad found it difficult to show affection. Don't really know why, maybe it was generally how men were or maybe it was because of his WW2 experiences.

Or maybe my dad was just very old-fashioned and didn't see the need for showing affection or for frivolous spending. From memory he never bought us anything. My mum put it down to him being 'tight' as she called it. But maybe he was careful and thrifty. He wasn't short of money by any means. But I suppose, because he'd provided the roof over our heads, he thought his job was done. At the time, I simply thought this was typical of most other families. Was this the same for others ?

Whereas my mum was the complete opposite. She was a very caring mum who worked exceptionally hard all her life. She went out of her way to get us everything she could. I don't ever remember going without, far from it. She was definitely part of the newer movement of working women. And whether by choice or by need, she certainly enjoyed what she did and moved wholeheartedly into the 1960s.

Needless to say, my mum struck out for independence and they eventually divorced. This was a very unpleasant process in the 1970s. But in time she found her independence.

Shall now replace my rose-tinted specs !!!

Viv.
It made me really sad to read your post. I am the oldest of 5 children and all through my life growing up in the 50s I knew nothing but love from both my Mum and Dad. Don't get me wrong, Dad was quite strict with us and we all often had a smack if we misbehaved, but he worked hard to provide us with everything we needed and I can honestly say I've never been hungry, I've always had a roof over my head and clothes on my back. We had holidays every year even if it was in a tent at Weston. Both my parents tried to guide us morally and taught us to think "there for the grace of god" when looking at people less fortunate.
It may have something to do with their own upbringing. Neither of them had a particularly wonderful childhood. Mum was the youngest of 13 children and was often left to fend for herself while her Mum went off for days on end. Dad's dad was a drinker and often beat his wife in front of his children so perhaps they, like you, made sure that their kids would never undergo what they did.
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Viv, I couldn't remember which thread your post about your Dad was on so it's taken me a while to respond.

I had a very happy childhood and was well loved by both of my parents (according to my cousin I was really spoiled but hey-ho!)
Looking back, Mom was far more hands on than Dad but I think that was partly the amount of time he was at work. I did get the occasional slap but I know that what when I had pushed them too far (quite often as I recall!)
My overall sense of him was one of disappointment. He came from a very working class background and his older sister passed to go to King Edwards. Nan & Grandad managed to buy her equipment and uniform (which was no small feat in the 1920's) but she couldn't cope and had to leave after 6 months. I think that the divide between the 'haves' and 'have nots' was much wider then, although I found it a shock when I went to Erdington Grammar in the 50's, and so did my cousin when she went to Sutton Girls, but that's another story.
Dad was very clever but understandably perhaps he wasn't given the chance to try for the grammar school as Lillian hadn't stayed the course and Dad remained at Slade Road. He ended up at the Co-op on Stockland Green. This lack of education had a knock-on effect during the war as far as promotion in the navy was concerned but it was even worse when he came back to civvie street and found himself with nowhere to live and a wife and son to support.
My brother, two years older than me and born before Dad was demobbed, was very clever and hard working. I do believe Dad resented his success at school and made his life very unhappy which is extremely sad. Dad wouldn't let him go to university although he had the qualifications and had to wait until he was in his 50's to do this. Dad died when I was 16 so we never got a chance to talk things out.
I think the saddest thing is when my niece said to me 'Why do you remember your dad with affection and my dad doesn't?'
 

joe 90

master brummie
Hi Mbenne. Not heard of bleach deliveries before. Like you say, could've been local. Strange you should mention the 'Christmas Box'. Don't think many people do that these days. We always did for the Coalman, the Dustman, the Baker and the Milkman. Don't know how much was given to each though. Whatever it was, it was a gesture of appreciation. Can't say I'd want to get up at the hours of a milkman in those days, in all weathers too driving a cold, open-sided milk float. Viv.
I worked for Midland Counties Dairy in 1967 in my younger days and at Xmas you would get an average of 2'6d a customer and with 420 customers it was a tidy sum. joe90
 
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