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Bus conversions

Radiorails

master brummie
Good to see that photo Lloyd. Post 3). I searched for it but without success.
You will know, but for the other readers I will mention that it was bus 92 MV489, an AEC of 1931`. It was a demonstrator and lasted, as a bus, until 1937. Six wheelers were rare outside London, except for trolleybuses of course.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The second photo from Lloyd (post 4) shows former bus 679 of 1935. It remained a bus until 1947 and lasted in the form shown in the photograph for another 20 years apparently.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Not strictly conversions - it was the buses that were the conversions - were the experimental gas trailers used for a short time in mid WW2 as an attempt - not a successful one it seems - to save petrol. U Boats were sinking many oil tankers especially of the Atlantic coast of the USA.
The BCT had these gas producing trailers, based at Birchfield Road which paired with the piano front AEC Regents of 1930/31. There is mention and photographs of these in other BHF threads.

The Midland Red also were lumbered with gas producing trailers. It was a government directive.
It seems they were used with 15 of the the single deck SOS IM6's in the Evesham area.
Looking at a photograph of the rear of one of the trailers used by BCT suggests that there was a T plate (for trailer); the customary clear reflective jewels on a black background.
The B&MMO one did not have the T but did carry a registration plate being the same notation of the bus towing it.
Whether this applied to all the trailers I do not know. There were some difference in appearance of the firebox between the two photos, but maybe they were from different manufacturers.
1590263021859.png
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
I did a few journeys in 679 in the late 50s while working for the Cashier's Office - every Wednesday morning to the Midland Bank in Stephenson Place & back to Congreve Street - always just over £100,000 for wages. And a once a month extra for salaried staffs.

Maurice :cool:
 

Alf Rogers

knowlegable brummie
I did a few journeys in 679 in the late 50s while working for the Cashier's Office - every Wednesday morning to the Midland Bank in Stephenson Place & back to Congreve Street - always just over £100,000 for wages. And a once a month extra for salaried staffs.

Maurice :cool:
Great story, Maurice! What was 679 like to drive, with all that weight on board? And no power steering, no doubt! Regards, Alf.
 

sospiri

Ex-pat Brummie
Alf,

I didn't have to dirve, we had the usual BCT driver. About 6 of us sitting on the floor inside. Different route every time, of course.

Maurice :cool:
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
My great-grandfather had a yard in opposite St Marys Church Ward End called Pardoes Yard. He once bought half a dozen single decker buses in the early 1950’s. He took out the engines, seats etc to convert them to caravans for holiday accommodation.

I don’t know where these conversions were sent to but do know that there were a number of converted buses at Severn Beach, Gloucester.

The photo shows my maternal grandparents, location unknown. Again, I am not sure if this is one of my great-grandfather’s conversions, it looks a bit rickety and my great-grandfather was a wheelwright by trade, so in all fairness I would have expected a better job. Also, my dad used to see him working on converting the busses and said he was doing quite a good job of them.familyAlbum114#006.jpg
 
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