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Birmingham Cinemas

handlebar

master brummie
Thanks jnCohen for a most interesting write up. I often passed both cinemas in the 50's and on odd occaions my mum would take me to the High Street theatre. Mikejee. These are not the same pictures but again show a property that has been criminally neglected. I lived directly opposite the Royalty and just lifted the curtain to see what was on. The rich entered through the front doors and the rest of us through the end door having a separate paybox. The people of Harborne should be ashamed of themselves for not seeing the potential of this old Cinema. It was a single screen to the end. Personally, I loved The Picture House (The Old Harborne) in Serpentine road where my grandmother had worked as an usherette under Waller Jeffs. It's now the Village Club. The stage is now the opposite end to the screen . It had no balcony but always had first class presentation. I still think of it fondly, especially the Saturday morning picture club ('we come along, on Saturday morning etc.) Happy days indeed.
 

Banjo

master brummie
I'm having a whale of a time at the moment cross referencing my old 30s map to various photos but, I've just noticed a cinema on Lozells Rd between Wheelers St & Wilton St. It may have been discussed on this thread before but would love any info on it.
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
The other version of The Picture House 56 Lozells Road. I don't know which was the first or second, but the original was opened in 1911,it was rebuilt in 1922. It was completely destroyed in an air raid on July 28th 1942 when the manager Lionel Jennings who was on fire watch was killed.
 

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Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
yes barry the lozells pic house has been discussed in depth i think it was on the lozells road thread..our mom was in the same class as the managers daughter at lozells girls school...she told me how she remembers the head teacher letting the school know in assembly about mr jennings being killed..

lyn
 

Mike Blakemore

master brummie
The Lozells QuestionAccording to the Files. When First the Cinema opened for a very short time it was known as Aston Picture Palace. Then to Lozells Picture house designed by Hipkiss and Stephens. The new theatre was built to the plans of architect Horace G. Bradley, it opened on 23rd December 1922 as the Lozells Picture Theatre with a special opening programme. It was officially opened to the public on 26th December 1922 with Conrad Nagel in "Saturday Night" and Gerald McCarthy in "Married Life".Seating was provided in stalls and circle levels, and cinema had a cafe. In 1926, a Wulitzer 2Manual/6Rank Style B organ was installed and opened by organist Ernest Newman. In 1927, it became the first provincial cinema organ to be broadcast on BBC radio, with Paul Rimmer playing. A later resident organist was Edwin Godbold.On 28th July 1943, the Lozells Picture Theatre was completely destroyed by German bombs, killing the manager, who was fire-watching on the roof. The film playing was Clarke Gable in "Honky Tonk"I hope that this is of help :eek:)
The other version of The Picture House 56 Lozells Road. I don't know which was the first or second, but the original was opened in 1911,it was rebuilt in 1922. It was completely destroyed in an air raid on July 28th 1942 when the manager Lionel Jennings who was on fire watch was killed.
 

cabman2

knowlegable brummie
That was the Electric cinema I think. There was also the Tatler in Station street and The News Theatre hitch showed all cartoons
 

paul stacey

master brummie
Many memories as a kid, went with dad and mom often, it was the place to see "Disney", cartoons and films, saw, "Snow white, Bambi, and Pinocchio, and regular Donald Duck, MM", Dad liked the News programs and such like. Then for a cuppa in New St Station, and perhaps a sight of the "Flying Scotsman". Paul
 
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