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Wagon Lane, Sheldon, Isolation Hospital

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
hi janice i think i am getting a bit confused now as i thought the workhouse and the isolation hospital were one and the same place could someone confirm that for me please

lyn
 

pjmburns

master brummie
Not in Solihull. The Workhouse in Lode Lane built in 1878 became the hospital but there was a separate place at Catherine de Barnes built in 1907 for isolation cases. In fact the last person to die in the world of smallpox died there in 1978. (according to google).
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
tragic story and awful images pedro...thank god smallpox is no longer in this country.
 

devonjim

master brummie
Vividly remember the Birmingham small pox case. The lady who died lived in West Heath and my sister in law's parents lived in the same road.
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
Hi, not sure this is relevant, but in 1968, I joined the Midland Cycling and Athletic Club, based in what was called the Henwood Lane Institute, Catherine-de-Barnes, Solihull.
This was next to the Isolation Hospital, Smallpox if I remember.
Sure it was something to do at some time with Olton Hospital, remember Mother saying someone she knew went in there after the war?
Not sure if I asked this before, but are you still a member of the MC&AC? I joined in 1946 and I am still a member John Crump
 

Beryl Martin

New Member
In the 1888 OS map it is called the Solihull Union Hospital, which suggests to me it was originally a workhouse. By the 1905 map it is listed as an isolation hospital, and is still listed as that in the 1919 map, but with disused added. In 1938 the building is still there, but not named. In 1953 it appears to be a school, though with some alteration. It now appears tonhave been demolished and is part of the playing fields, though possibly part ofnthe site is incorporated into the housing
I am very interested about the building referred to. I lived in Gilbertstone Avenue from 1943 and attended a school at the Wagon Lane side of the playing fields. It was a smallish building (I wonder now if it was the hospital/workhouse you refer to). It was called Wagon Lane School. I went there for two years (from 1948-1950) before moving up to Chapel Fields School when aged 7. Wagon Lane school was a very old building. Two small classrooms. We ate our lunch on our desks. I remember how much I loved the summers. All our classes were outside on the grass a few steps from the 'moat' that used to run along the Wagon Lane side of the playing fields. My name then was Beryl Martin.
 

Beryl Martin

New Member
Not in Solihull. The Workhouse in Lode Lane built in 1878 became the hospital but there was a separate place at Catherine de Barnes built in 1907 for isolation cases. In fact the last person to die in the world of smallpox died there in 1978. (according to google).
I lived not too far from the Isolation Hospital in Catherine-de-Barnes, from 1965 until 1978. I was always grateful to be on the same electricity grid as the hospital because we never lost power during the many outages that happened during that era. I believe the isolation hospital was closed for many years before the '60's but do remember that they reopened it for just one person with smallpox, in the '70's. I guess that is the statistic that you mention.
 

impis

master brummie
I grew up in the road alongside the Wagon lane park, [Lyndon playing fields] right next to the old hospital buildings. They were there in 1966, and were still there when I left home in 1974. However, they were no longer used as a hospital, though it was common knowledge at the time that it had originally been a hospital. Instead, during the football season, the buildings provided shelter and changing facilities for the footballers who came to use the pitches. Sometime in the late 70s, or possibly early 80s, the buildings were demolished [they were in a very poor state anyway], leaving just concrete bases behind. Then later, those were removed completely and the area was grassed over. Interestingly, I was told that Lydnon playing fields had been donated to the council to be used as a recreation ground, forever, by the two farming brothers who lived in the little farmhouse next to it. [still there, along with converted farm buildings]
 

oldbrit

OldBrit in Exile
Hi, not sure this is relevant, but in 1968, I joined the Midland Cycling and Athletic Club, based in what was called the Henwood Lane Institute, Catherine-de-Barnes, Solihull.
This was next to the Isolation Hospital, Smallpox if I remember.
Sure it was something to do at some time with Olton Hospital, remember Mother saying someone she knew went in there after the war?
PAUL SIMPSON Hi. When I rode and raced for the Midland C&AC in the 1950s My mentor was JACK SIMPSON a great rider and racer in those days. Had a cafe on Cov Rd where the airport is now, Is he a relative he was from Yorkshire? Are you still a member do you know Paul Gould and John Pottier?
 
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