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They Were Caught In Our Old Street Pics...

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Gosh Jim that is quite sad. When I went into the building trade at 16 there were around 300 fatality’s a year. Most of them were ladders accident or falls from height.
Strangely enough very little has changed, not so many accidents and deaths now but still a great many attributed to falls from heights and also nowadays being crushed when in an elevated work platform is not stopped as it ascends and hits the roof. Even though the wearing of safety harnesses is mandatory, they only give you about 10 minutes chance of living. Somewhere on the forum is that wonderful picture of the man up the 20foot pole ladder with no safety precautions in place at all.

Bob
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
On a lockdown-browse through the thread again I looked at this. Quiet looking crowd, a strangely dressed trader who does not look interested. Maybe it's the end of a long day and the crowd are hoping he/she will sell the flowers off cheap.
In the Bull Ring a somewhat unusually dressed trader is selling 'English Fresh Cut Flowers'. Serious looking faces in the crowd. No date but looks mid 1930s to me.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I expect I made a comment the first time around with the photo.
On reflection the trader, I believe is the shorter man (3rd. from left with the leaning back posture) is the trader. The unusually attired man is a customer - probably the black car is his and if taken today the photo might suggest he is using a mobile phone. ;)
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
I expect I made a comment the first time around with the photo.
On reflection the trader, I believe is the shorter man (3rd. from left with the leaning back posture) is the trader. The unusually attired man is a customer - probably the black car is his and if taken today the photo might suggest he is using a mobile phone. ;)
The black car has boxes of english-fresh-cut-flowers on it's roof so I think the car belongs to the man in black and he's trading ... and probably counting threepenny bits .... but who knows for certain ... :)
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The black car has boxes of english-fresh-cut-flowers on it's roof so I think the car belongs to the man in black and he's trading ... and probably counting threepenny bits .... but who knows for certain ... :)
Then, OM, it is probably safe to assume the guy 'with the phone', which is probably a notebook (paper type), is in fact a wholesaler who has just made a delivery..
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Looks like hes Russian with that hat on.It also looks like hes selling flower bulbs.
Thank you for your comment, I have seen this sort of outfit and hat before and I believe actually it is Dutch or Flemish. But for the life of me I cannot recall the where or the when. Season/timewise, I notice that all the men (why no women) are wearing coats and hats and the trees have no foliage, so early spring/late winter and first daffodils from East Anglia? He is the trader and the car is his and he is actually on his Google translator app answering a customers question. I think the hat could be an Astrakahn hat, because whilst the Russian ones are usually round, you can get them forage cap shaped.
Bob
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Thank you for your comment, I have seen this sort of outfit and hat before and I believe actually it is Dutch or Flemish. But for the life of me I cannot recall the where or the when. Season/timewise, I notice that all the men (why no women) are wearing coats and hats and the trees have no foliage, so early spring/late winter and first daffodils from East Anglia? He is the trader and the car is his and he is actually on his Google translator app answering a customers question. I think the hat could be an Astrakahn hat, because whilst the Russian ones are usually round, you can get them forage cap shaped.
Bob
1588160416748.png
A Dutch, Volendam (a fishing town ) style which is similar, Bob. There seen to be variations of this style of clothing, often found in coastal towns in The Low Countries and parts of France.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
View attachment 144591
A Dutch, Volendam (a fishing town ) style which is similar, Bob. There seen to be variations of this style of clothing, often found in coastal towns in The Low Countries and parts of France.
Does your wife not object to you keeping him in your wardrobe? Prior to WWII a number of the Lincolnshire Bulb Growers were of Dutch extraction. Although, amazingly enough, here in North Devon, we had the Bulb Farm in Braunton and according to his literature he was one of the biggest suppliers of Daffodils (or Daddofils as it says in his brochure circa 1935/6) in England.

Bob
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Most of the Fenlands of East Anglia owe their existence to a Dutchman, Cornelius Vermuyden. His attire was different.1588169668427.png

PS: Don't get the wardrobe bit. The Bank Manager tried but he never made the staircase. :laughing:
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
I expect I made a comment the first time around with the photo.
On reflection the trader, I believe is the shorter man (3rd. from left with the leaning back posture) is the trader. The unusually attired man is a customer - probably the black car is his and if taken today the photo might suggest he is using a mobile phone. ;)
Rr why would the customer allow the trader to stack boxes on his car though ? Don't you think that the man has got a belt on his overcoat and just happens to be sporting an Astrakhan hat , like Krushchev used to wear
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The black car has boxes of english-fresh-cut-flowers on it's roof so I think the car belongs to the man in black and he's trading ... and probably counting threepenny bits .... but who knows for certain ... :)
[/QUOTE
I believe the man in black is a wholesaler hence the boxes on his car roof. The thread has got a little convoluted.
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
Returning to the question of grammar school uniforms, the one which I attended excused the sixth form boys from wearing caps in the early 1960s, saving my parents the expense of buying one for me, as it differed from that worn by the lower forms. The school became a comprehensive a few years after my departure, probably a good thing. At least we were allowed to wear long trousers from the first form, it always seemed silly seeing six foot tall g s boys in blazer and tailored shorts.

Cheers
jfs
 
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