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Then & Now

Richard Dye

master brummie
I am not sure this is the place to ask this, if there is a better place please let me know.

Since I am now almost retired I am re doubling my effort to better understand the Industrial Revolution. I have (and continue) to study Brunel, Boulton, Murdoch, Watt, Trevethick etc., I constantly watch videos/movies on Amazon and get more enthused each time by how much I do not know. As a model I understand Soho Rd, Boulton Rd, Wattville Rd and how they go there, my question: Is there a history somewhere that shows or tells why Hockley, Aston , Birchfield, Handsworth and the other places we know so well; came to be?

Steelhouse Lane the gun & jewelry quarter most understand that but what came first the chicken or the egg. My goal is to try to understand the history of how and what made each section of Brum to develop!

Thank you in advance for your tolerance and understanding..........
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Both jewellery and guns were originally dependent on a number of sub-contractors, the products of which were then either further processed orlater put together by yet another firm. It made sense for the firms to be close together, this even more so with gunmaking.
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
Well that is an interesting little project you have chosen to undertake. It should keep you busy for the next hundred years or so. A couple of things you may wish to think about are:


Birmingham developed a canal network for ease of materials in and goods out.

The combination of a local source of Limestone, iron ore and coal

Birmingham lifted the restrictions that were imposed by trade guilds


Do bear in mind that when researching history there is no subjective or definitive answer, which to me makes it so much more interesting.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Bill Dargue’s History of Birmingham places and Place names is a good start and reference

 

Richard Dye

master brummie
Well that is an interesting little project you have chosen to undertake. It should keep you busy for the next hundred years or so. A couple of things you may wish to think about are:


Birmingham developed a canal network for ease of materials in and goods out.

The combination of a local source of Limestone, iron ore and coal

Birmingham lifted the restrictions that were imposed by trade guilds


Do bear in mind that when researching history there is no subjective or definitive answer, which to me makes it so much more interesting.

Morturn, yes as I began to think about the project it developed “scope creep” However you have quickly given me an insight as to why the canals were built, unfortunately I am going to be a few years short of 100. My goal is to learn as much as possible about Brum and hopefully understand the WHY as well as the how being sure to recognize many of the findings will be somewhat subjective!
Thank you!
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
Bill Dargue’s History of Birmingham places and Place names is a good start and reference

Pedro, thank you............

I am still trying to digest Morts comments this is a great addition. thanks to you all I am going to have to organize myself better just to handle/process the information from you both.
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
My pleasure. Project creep or as you call it scope creep is actually good in terms of history. Once you free yourself of the constraints that academic history taught you it opens up a whole new way of seeing the past.

I always say that history propagates. You take a look into something and it opened up and takes you to all sorts of places. Enjoy.
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
My pleasure. Project creep or as you call it scope creep is actually good in terms of history. Once you free yourself of the constraints that academic history taught you it opens up a whole new way of seeing the past.

I always say that history propagates. You take a look into something and it opened up and takes you to all sorts of places. Enjoy.
Thank you, you are so right regarding the constraints taught be academic history!

I knew about canals (not the why) and coal but not the limestone and iron ore, now it really has begun to propagate!
 

devonjim

master brummie
Looking down a tree lined Clements Road towards Hob Moor Rd date unknown.
View attachment 147096

A look down Clements Road in 1950 would have shown houses each side and the prefabs on the far side of Hob Moor Road.
View attachment 147097

A look down Clements Road today shows the houses but no prefabs in Hob Moor Road.
View attachment 147098
I would have travelled past the 1950 pre-fabs on my daily trips to and from school. Also spent much time playing cricket both on the ground top centre(Marlboro CC) also Henry Rd playing fields and The Oaklands in the area adjacent to the pre-fabs.
 

Pat Sattar-Jennings

master brummie
I worked at Coventry Rd Garage as a conductor then driver 1969-1973. When I first came out driving, the buses used to exit via that Coventry Rd gateway. It was always a risk that someone would come tearing round the bend and collide with you. That's probably the reason we changed to coming out of the back into Arthur St around 1971.


Do your remember the scrappy on the corner opposite the Bus Garage or who worked there?
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Well that is an interesting little project you have chosen to undertake. It should keep you busy for the next hundred years or so. A couple of things you may wish to think about are:


Birmingham developed a canal network for ease of materials in and goods out.

The combination of a local source of Limestone, iron ore and coal

Birmingham lifted the restrictions that were imposed by trade guilds


Do bear in mind that when researching history there is no subjective or definitive answer, which to me makes it so much more interesting.
'Birmingham lifted the restrictions that were imposed by trade guilds'.....Mort please expand

Bob
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
A poem to which we can relate



I remember the corned beef of my Childhood,
And the bread that we cut with a knife,
When the Children helped with the housework,
And the men went to work not the wife.



The cheese never needed a fridge,
And the bread was so crusty and hot,
The Children were seldom unhappy,
And the Wife was content with her lot.



I remember the milk from the bottle,
With the yummy cream on the top,
Our dinner came hot from the oven,
And not from a freezer; or shop.



The kids were a lot more contented,
They didn't need money for kicks,
Just a game with their friends in the road,
And sometimes the Saturday flicks.



I remember the shop on the corner,
Where biscuits for pennies were sold
Do you think I'm a bit too nostalgic?
Or is it....I'm just getting Old?





Bathing was done in a wash tub,
With plenty of rich foamy suds
But the ironing seemed never ending
As Mum pressed everyone's 'duds'.



I remember the slap on my backside,
And the taste of soap if I swore
Anorexia and diets weren't heard of
And we hadn't much choice what we wore.



Do you think that bruised our ego?
Or our initiative was destroyed?
We ate what was put on the table
And I think life was better enjoyed.



Author, Unknown ..



If you can remember those days...
Continue to enjoy your Retirement.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
New Street long ago. A horse trudges across the scene as city gents walk on the right maybe off to lunch. Nice view of the Hyam store.
Old_New_street.jpg

Today ... the building on the opposite corner is still there. Strange bright yellow structures in the view ... I suppose they are there for some reason ...
NowNewSt.jpg
 
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