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The Ice Cream Man

Edifi

master brummie
My mother worked for Greco's ice ceam in Vauxhall Rd.With a push bike
 
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Lindaquinlan

New Member
Carolina dear Verrecchia probably the first ice cream maker to have an ice cream parlour 1953/55 just before the hill going up Dudley Rd from Spring Hill . May have been the first ice cream vans with fluorescent lights early 60's Tony Verrecchia used to cover quite a lot of Birmingham, I remember him in Winson Green area while visiting my sister RIP in Harding St. Tony carried the business on from his Father then Tony died some years ago
Severo verrecchia was an early italian icecream trader in bham. Factory and shop on Dudley rd. also vans. Started up in 1935, not 1953/1955. Verrecchia's still trade in bham today, run by my nephew dean who is Tony's son. Verrecchia's in Cambridge is owned by Ivo Verrecchia, a cousin to Severo. Severo was my father.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The best ice cream that I was aware of, around the 1950 area, was obtainable in Henley-in-Arden.
It was well worth a ten mile, or so, cycle ride to get it. The trip was combined with train spotting, canal towpath cycling and usually a pleasant young persons kind of day out. :)
 

Radiorails

master brummie
As a youngster the history of Henley-in-Arden ice cream was of little interest, just its availability. I had believed it to be a post WW2 product - well lollipops, ice creams and sweets were in very short supply up until the late 1940's - but I notice its history goes back to 1934. I guess it was the West Country milk that made it especial at the time I lived near there. I did visit the tea rooms in 1980 when on a visit to the Midlands, but of course I was never in there as a youngster - food was always 'on the hoof' when cycling around. ;) Fast food is not as new as some would have you believe. After all, who invented fish and chips? Good to see that the place is now a family affair and not a conglomerate one.
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Vampire
The best ice cream that I was aware of, around the 1950 area, was obtainable in Henley-in-Arden.
It was well worth a ten mile, or so, cycle ride to get it. The trip was combined with train spotting, canal towpath cycling and usually a pleasant young persons kind of day out. :)
well said. sitting on the station platform. watching the trains go past. eating ice cream.and drinking arden mineral water. "POP"
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Radiorails wonder if the kids of today would at it in the same vain.
I don't know, many areas of the country do not have railway lines to sit by and those that do it is generally high speed. Probably some do on the numerous heritage type lines. But, it was a different age, we never cried for the moon - we knew we wouldn't get it! Our expectations and needs were tempered by the times.
 
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Edifi

master brummie
As you say it's a different age and world.We would sit for hours at Bromford Bridge train spotting,Today it's an I Pad or phone for many of them.
 

Elmdon Boy

master brummie
Probably those youngsters of yesteryear radiorails are now the oldies today, still doing it at the steam heritage sites.
Very few of todays youngsters seem to interested in the old methods of transport, aircraft, trains or cars.
I got my interest in aircraft from spotting aircraft at Elmdon and other airfields as a schoolboy in the early 60s.
You never see schoolboys doing that these days.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Most volunteers on heritage lines - and other leisure places - are older because they are retired. These are platform,ticket office and collectors, guards and light maintenance workers. However the larger, more progressive lines have many employees who are younger and some volunteers also who are younger as the work on railways can be quite heavy and arduous. Providing youngsters are welcomed then they soon settle in from what I see.
And to bring the thread back on topic many get involved in cafeterias - plus selling books and ice creams. ;)
 

jmadone

master brummie
As a child quite a few of our holidays in the 1950s were spent in and around Weymouth. My mom always insisted on going to Rossi's ice cream parlour to taste what she described as "The best Ice cream in the world!" I have to admit it did seem tastier than the ones we occasionally had back home but was it because we were on holiday? I don't know, when you're a kid all ice cream tastes great. A couple of years ago I was in Weymouth again just for the day and lo and behold Rossi's still had an ice cream shop on the promenade and yes the ice cream did taste wonderful and just as I remember it 60 or so years ago.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
As a child quite a few of our holidays in the 1950s were spent in and around Weymouth. My mom always insisted on going to Rossi's ice cream parlour to taste what she described as "The best Ice cream in the world!" I have to admit it did seem tastier than the ones we occasionally had back home but was it because we were on holiday? I don't know, when you're a kid all ice cream tastes great. A couple of years ago I was in Weymouth again just for the day and lo and behold Rossi's still had an ice cream shop on the promenade and yes the ice cream did taste wonderful and just as I remember it 60 or so years ago.
how lovely jim....still there after all those years.. :)

lyn
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I guess most of the traditional seaside resorts had their ice cream parlours - usually with Italian names. Torbay had a couple, Pelosi and Dimeo. Of course they were usually in prominent positions so others had to rely on Walls (who seemed to have a monopoly with the shop style refrigerators) and mobile van sellers. There were regional manufacturers names as well.
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
Severo verrecchia was an early italian icecream trader in bham. Factory and shop on Dudley rd. also vans. Started up in 1935, not 1953/1955. Verrecchia's still trade in bham today, run by my nephew dean who is Tony's son. Verrecchia's in Cambridge is owned by Ivo Verrecchia, a cousin to Severo. Severo was my father.
Linda my dates quoted were when I first observed the parlour not when the business started, I was well aware of Tony and the vans, and used to look forward to his chimes as a kid
 

suemalings

master brummie
I remember the Ice Cream Man used to come down Hall Road to the corner of Ask Road. Every night at 8.45 on the dot. He sold the soft ice cream, the only place I think you could get it was the ice cream man. (I know now that it is nothing like real ice cream). By the way the name 99 comes from 99% ice cream and 1% chocolate. Well that's what I have been told. Verrecchia ice cream is still here in Cambridge. In fact their mobile vendors seem to be everywhere in the city. The very best ice cream though has to be Italian, especially that available here at the Italian ice cream parlours.
 

mw0njm.

A Brummie Vampire
I remember the Ice Cream Man used to come down Hall Road to the corner of Ask Road. Every night at 8.45 on the dot. He sold the soft ice cream, the only place I think you could get it was the ice cream man. (I know now that it is nothing like real ice cream). By the way the name 99 comes from 99% ice cream and 1% chocolate. Well that's what I have been told. Verrecchia ice cream is still here in Cambridge. In fact their mobile vendors seem to be everywhere in the city. The very best ice cream though has to be Italian, especially that available here at the Italian ice cream parlours.
we all have different tastes. i never liked, Verrecchia ice cream . mr wippy was ok...
 
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