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Silly Rhymes.

Arkrite

master brummie
We have all had a moment when a less than half remembered memory of an old rhyme or saying from our childhood has driven us half mad trying to remember the rest of it.
I discovered this website while hunting down five words or so of a rhyme remembered by a member of another Midlands forum.
Its worth a look because of the stranger rhymes it contains as well as the better known ones.
I must warn you that the choice of background and colour of the writing is not well matched which can make reading it sometimes difficult. Any way, for what its worth take a look at
https://www.whimsy.org.uk/nonsense.html

Here is a taste,Tom tied a kettle to the tail of a cat;
Jill put a stone in the blind man's hat;
Bob threw his grandmother down the stairs -
And they all grew up ugly and nobody cares


ASBOs all round
 
W

Wendy

Guest
We have had the two five year old grandchildren for a 'sleepover'. Granddad started singing I'm The King Of The Castle Your The Dirty Rascal. To which they asked what's a rascal. My language has changed.
 

Arkrite

master brummie
My mrs tried to teach her grandsons the old rhymes but once they discovered the PlayStation all interest was lost. What will these new generations have when the time comes to bounce baby on their knees. Absolute silence or may be just stick'em in front of the TV.Which I have seen done by parents who swore they would never do it.I hate to sound like the boring old **** which I probably am, but the computer processor is a mixed blessing.Children interact less now with parents and peers, communication skills suffer,texting provides poor literacy and TV/ Videos teach them bad manners and how to swear. In my day it was having mates who taught you all those things.
 
M

mike-g

Guest
What about this one, Mary had a little lamb, she also had a bear, ever ywhere that Mary went you saw her bear behind
Mary had a little lamb, she also had a bear Ive often seen her little lamb but ive never seen her bear
 

Pomgolian

Kiwi Brummie Admin' Team
I still use heaps of the old Nursery and Skipping Rhymes that I knew as a child at work (ages 0 to 5) and often have the kids in stitches explaining all the old words and coinage... some already mentioned and
1)Sing a song of 6d
2)1d 'eth of chips to grease ya lips
3) Sea-saw... Johnny will get a new master, he will get but a 1d a day...
4)P.K a 2d a packet first you chew it then you crack it...
So on and so on and other words like Cinders, stout, a runcible spoon... the list is never ending
 

Arkrite

master brummie
Thank goodness someone is still carrying on the tradition but I fear you may be in a minority. May some of what teach fall on fertile minds and so may the tradition survive.

Pssst....What is a runcible spoon ? At my school you were taught to keep you mouth shut,not ask questions and not grass up the other inmates .
 

Pomgolian

Kiwi Brummie Admin' Team
Arkrite... It's a two ended spoon .... one end the size of a table spoon the other the size of a tea spoon...
 

db84124

Brummophile
Hello Pomgolian,
Having a profound interest in the English language, may I ask where you came across your definition of runcible spoon? I was always led to believe the Edward Lear-invented word incorporated in "The Owl and The Pussy-cat" had the meaning of ........... a schizophrenic fork, i.e., a three-pronged fork, such as a pickle fork or a pseudo-posh family's dessert fork, curved like a spoon and having a semi-sharp edge to cut the cake before "stabbing" it and forking it into the mouth. I've never seen the kind of spoon you describe. What was its use? David
 

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
My mom used to say I chased a bug around a tree I'll catch his blood he knows I will. Or something like that. Jean.
 

db84124

Brummophile
Bernard and mike,
Have you heard this variant:
Mary had a little lamb,
Some strawberries for dessert;
Then she gave the wrong address,
The wicked little flirt .....
Hoping you're well, David
 

dek carr

gone but not forgotten
Please excuse my Roman Catholic upbringing for this version of Mary Had A Little Lamb


Mary had a little lamb she kept it in a bucket every time the lamb got out the sheepdog used to bark.----no signature
 

db84124

Brummophile
...... these are what I've always believed to be very similar to Edward Lear's ''runcible spoons".
I'm very sorry about the tarnish, but they haven't been polished since my Mum died in January last year. David
 

G G Jean

Brummy Wench.
Dave don't polish them leave them as they are. Right hows about the boy stood on the burning deck ones. Delete if too naughty. A boy stood on a burning deck having a game of cricket, the ball went up his trouser leg and hit his middle wicket. Any more for any more. Jean.
 

berniew

master brummie
If you google runcible spoon there are both definitions and also on wikipedia an illustration of dolimuphus duck with a runcible spoon that dosen't confirm either ,the illustration is one of Lear's. It seems to be a word he invented and other people have defined . Bernie
 

Arkrite

master brummie
I wander if other countries have such a rich heritage of silly rhymes . I can understand places like Canada, Australia, New Zealand having one but have no knowledge of other places. Any thoughts ?
 

db84124

Brummophile
Good morning, Bernie,
Yes, I went to the Wikipedia page yesterday evening, saw both definitions and the illustration (which - having been drawn by Lear himself - should be accepted as the authoritative ''runcible spoon") and this morning I've had a quick rummage and come up with things that have been in the family for many-a-year.

Whichever definition you apply - barring Pomgolian's - I'VE GOT ONE !!!! David
 

db84124

Brummophile
This is dedicated to Jean :
This was heard in an episode of Only Fools and Horses when a drunken Del Boy shook a group of diners:
The boy stood on the burning deck,
His pockets full of crackers.
One slipped down his trouser-leg,
And burnt off both his ……. kneecaps!

I am in no way responsible for this rhyme; it was simply copied and pasted. What was acceptable on primetime television I hope will not cause a rumpus on BHF.
Best wishes, Jean. David
 

db84124

Brummophile
Jean,
The boy stood on the burning deck,
Picking his nose like mad.
He rolled it into little balls,
And flicked them at his dad.

(Please note that my previous posting is no worse than Dek's !!) David
 

db84124

Brummophile
Am I pushing my luck?
The boy stood on the burning deck
Eating a tuppenny Walls,
A bit dropped down his trouser leg
And paralysed his ...... prized possessions.
Dek (not really !!?!)
 
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