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shadwell street

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Paul
I can explain part of the reason for your confusion over the numbering,. The street houses were numbered ignoring the courts behind, and then the houses in the courts were numbered separately. At one time there were other houses in the court ,(nos 5 & 6) which had been demolished, and replaced by a workshop. as seen by comparing the two maps below from c 1950 and c1889. However no 7 was still there and kept its numbermap c1889 junc Bath street and little shadwell st.jpgmap c1950 junc Bath street and little shadwell st.jpg
 

Malcolm Robinson

master brummie
This information is interesting. The yard that I lived in was an open yard no entry to it. There was an air raid shelter situated at the bottom of it, where we used to play . I remember a telegraph pole right at the bottom of the yard
and next to it appeared to have been a house which was used as offices (I think) There was a yard entry up the side.
which I was not allowed to go up so I do not know what was up there, just told it was dangerous? The steps up to the house we used to play on them, jumping up and off them when there was no one in. The yard that I lived in had a stamp press at the top can't remember the name of it, two names are lurking somewhere in the grey matter. Heaton and Duggard , another name is Greeners, but not sure. The noise was horrendous, but we were allowed to stand in the doorway to get warm. I could never understand the numbers on the houses in the yard, 1, 5 , 2 and 7 with 11 at the front.
It looked as if there might have been houses opposite, there was as small covered area where 3 (miskins) dustbins. 3 toilets which were shared, two brewhouses (wash houses) then the stamp. I have recently returned to my childhood memories of Bath Street, and the Telegraph pole is still there, which is outside where the house stood either 8 or 9. You have stirred up a lot of my childhood days.
Pauljon

I am intrigued now. If you look at the street map on my post #37, I assumed the crossed lines between house 8 & 9 signified an entry to the yard and therefore the same would apply to the lines between house 10 & 11 opening up into Court 2. I have a attached a slightly blown up version of the map. My great grandfathers business is marked as gun barrel works. He lived in No 8 and I assume knocked down or adapted whatever properties there was in the Court (Court 1) into workshops to manufacture his gun barrels.

I know Greeners was also a major gun maker but I don't recognise the Heaton or Duggard names.

Malcolm
 

Attachments

  • 8 to 11 Bath Street.jpg
    8 to 11 Bath Street.jpg
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Malcolm Robinson

master brummie
Paul
I can explain part of the reason for your confusion over the numbering,. The street houses were numbered ignoring the courts behind, and then the houses in the courts were numbered separately. At one time there were other houses in the court ,(nos 5 & 6) which had been demolished, and replaced by a workshop. as seen by comparing the two maps below from c 1950 and c1889. However no 7 was still there and kept its numberView attachment 152774View attachment 152775
Mike,

Thank you for puuting up the 1950's map. It looks like the buildings that my great grand father lived and ran his business from the 'gun barrel works' from the 1889 map, where still standing in some form in the 1950s. I didn't discover anything about him until relatively recently so this is very interesting information for me. I know his business was bought out by Webley & Scott in 1899 for £1,250 which according to several websites is the equivalent of around £130-£150K. A not inconsiderable sum. I don't know where he went after he sold up and I can't find a photo anywhere taken from Little Shadwell Street with the photographers back to the Gunmakers pub. Malcolm
 

pauljon

master brummie
Thank you for sharing the maps, it looks as if our yard must have been court 2. The house numbers on it reads 4 3 2 7 11.
When my parents moved into this yard their house was Number 1/11, which is shown as number 4, they lived there, and my elder sister and brother were born. They moved into number 2 as it was slightly better, having a small pantry which ran the length of the house. At one end was a large brown sink, then along the wall had a small narrow table, and an old black gas cooker, the coal was next to it which ended under the stairs. Coal delivery was awful as all the dust would cover
everything and had to cleaned away. We didn't know any better yet we survived in these conditions until 1961. I and my younger sister were born in number 2. Number 7 had a small piece of yard fenced off as it faced up the yard giving space for a small private area. I thought this very posh. I have an old Birmingham friend who lived in Loveday Street, I will have to ask him if he has any further information for us, he is slightly older than me.
Pauline.
 

Malcolm Robinson

master brummie
Thank you for sharing the maps, it looks as if our yard must have been court 2. The house numbers on it reads 4 3 2 7 11.
When my parents moved into this yard their house was Number 1/11, which is shown as number 4, they lived there, and my elder sister and brother were born. They moved into number 2 as it was slightly better, having a small pantry which ran the length of the house. At one end was a large brown sink, then along the wall had a small narrow table, and an old black gas cooker, the coal was next to it which ended under the stairs. Coal delivery was awful as all the dust would cover
everything and had to cleaned away. We didn't know any better yet we survived in these conditions until 1961. I and my younger sister were born in number 2. Number 7 had a small piece of yard fenced off as it faced up the yard giving space for a small private area. I thought this very posh. I have an old Birmingham friend who lived in Loveday Street, I will have to ask him if he has any further information for us, he is slightly older than me.
Pauline.
Thank you, it's really nice to get a feeling of what the buildings and houses were like inside. You house sounds like the one my dad was brought up in, in Green Lane, Small Heath. Fortunately, when I was born in 1952, they had moved to a new council house in Garretts Green. Malcolm
 
hi folks..ugently seeking pics of shadwell st...i am struggling on this one so any help give would be great..i am trying to help a friend whos mom first lived above the gunmakers arms and then moved into a house in this street....its her 76 birthday in august and to see any pics of where she lived would really make her day

many thanks..

lyn
The Gunmakers Arms, is on Bath St, not Shadwell St.
 

pauljon

master brummie
The only other houses that I can recall in Bath Street, were right next door to the Gunmakers, and I had a friend who lived in one f them. There were another house at the top opposite St. Chad's Cathedral and next to a boarding house I think known as the Acorn (peoples name for it was the rout and out) Hotel. I never saw any house in Shadwell Street. There was just the yard that was at the back of the Gunmakers.
 

pauljon

master brummie
Correction to Bath Street, the lodging house was called the Racquet Court (not Acorn)
I never knew of any houses in Shadwell Street apart from the pub which was turned into a house.
 
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