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sayings

Lady Penelope

master brummie
oh crikey pen thats just taken me back...we sang it slightly different...eeny mey macaraca...dare die dumeracka sticka racka lollipop a rum tum push...out goes one out goes two out goes another one and thats means you....

where on earth this came from and what it meant i have no idea lol :D:D:D

lyn
Looks pretty much the same Lyn, doesn't it? It's amazing how these things got around. I heard it in the playground and park (which were quite near to each other but I suppose if youngsters went to visit relatives they'd play the same games and take the sayings with them.
 

Nico

master brummie
Don't know if it's been on before,my NAN used to say if my mother was moaning.Shes got her knickers in a twist.
Knickers in a knot. Coventry.
Drawers in a tangle.
Don't let your dingle dangle, dangle in the dust.
Only let your dingle dangle, dangle if it must.
Sung by dad.
 

Nico

master brummie
Living in a coastal community many expressions I hear have a marine connection.
Being inebriated can be referred to as "dree (three) sheets (sails) in the wind i.e all over the place and unsecured.
Another way would be to say "' ee be shippin' some watter".
A cup of tea in the rural areas might be known as '' a dish of tay'.
A comment might end with 'daunee knaw' (don't you know).
One saying I never fathomed its origin was 'ees fay' which is an agreement of a comment heard.
'Ma dear zawl' is often used as an exclamation.
'Towing in the tide' was an older custom for dealing with promiscuous women. Men, as usual, got no such treatment.
The 'higher the collar, the lower the church' was often said of Anglican clergy.
Older fishermen would always remind you 'that you zails by permission, Zir'
a person who has 'a lot of ole crams' would be someone fussy.
Older women would be apoplectic if you picked up their teapot, This was likely to 'give them ginger twins'.
A cup of tea, not filled well might cause the comment 'Aw, be the vicar cummin?'
To your last item mum would retort .
has the cart gone past?
 

Nico

master brummie
When my family moved from Stourbridge to Coventry people asked were they from Brummijum. Or found them hard to understand and vice versa sometimes with slang.
No one here knew what bally draft was, or chawl. Or sparrak chops. Batch cerk. Chickerlins. pays.
Snail buns. etc
 

Nico

master brummie
Does anyone remember when girls were skipping a saying , Chic a licka lollypop out goes one.
Ibble obble black bobble out goes you ibble obble black bobble out goes 2.....sometimes adding your shoes are dirty go and clean them at once. I always thought this was the rhymer not wanting to be out and adding a bit on.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmy
From the latest Black Country Magazine...

In English pubs, ale was ordered in pints and quarts, so in old England, when a customers got unruly, the bartender would yell, “mind your pints and quarts and settle down.” It’s where we get the phrase, “mind your P’s and Q’s.”
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
A late friend, Kenneth Jones who wasn't Welsh and was always thought to be, said when he was injured in WW2 all the Taffys spoke Welsh to quote him, to annoy the rest
Back in the 60s, drinking in the RWF club in Denbigh, I was told that, during the war the regt was nicknamed "The Brummie Fusiliers".
 

A Sparks

master brummie
From the latest Black Country Magazine...

In English pubs, ale was ordered in pints and quarts, so in old England, when a customers got unruly, the bartender would yell, “mind your pints and quarts and settle down.” It’s where we get the phrase, “mind your P’s and Q’s.”
Gosh, I never knew that - very interesting!
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
Pedrocut, That's really interesting. I always thought it meant 'mind you pleases and thank-q's' but that doesn't really make sense does it? Also I used to think the saying 'No peace for the wicked' was 'No peace for the wicket' and wondered for years what peace had to do with cricket until I read 'No peace for the wicked and the righteous don't need none'!
 

Nico

master brummie
RE pints and quarts, In "My Old Man Said Foller The Van", doesn't she sing, " And I stopped on the way to have me old have quart or quarten? " That's what Nan sang anyway, I wonder what a half quart or quarten was?
 

Nico

master brummie
"Where are you going Nan?" I wold ask, "Arm off to see Tip'n Run" she would reply. Can anyone tell me what that means please. Mum said people called Tipton Tip'n sometimes.
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
RE pints and quarts, In "My Old Man Said Foller The Van", doesn't she sing, " And I stopped on the way to have me old have quart or quarten? " That's what Nan sang anyway, I wonder what a half quart or quarten was?
I remember a small bottle of whiskey, bought from the outdoor, being called a quarten.
As for your mention of" tip 'n run", wasn' t that another name for a game of "Tag" ?
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
RE pints and quarts, In "My Old Man Said Foller The Van", doesn't she sing, " And I stopped on the way to have me old have quart or quarten? " That's what Nan sang anyway, I wonder what a half quart or quarten was?
 
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