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Pub Quiz League

I thought yesterday's Map Muddle might prove a little difficult and I reckon it must have been if Mike threw the towel in. However, two intrepid investigators, Curly and Elmo, managed to crack the puzzle. The key to unlocking the muddle was the large structure which, as Curly has posted, is the old synagogue in Blucher Street. This meant that the right-angled thoroughfare was Ellis Street leading to Gough Street. A hideous car park now stands on the site of the old boozer. Unfortunately for knobbydave he was in the right location but, as harsh as it is in this quiz, a precedent has been set where there are no half-points given. Anyway, the answer was the Woodbine Inn. I did provide an extra clue in that the woman at the top-right was taken from a well-known Robert Opie postcard advertising Woodbine fags. See : https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ADVERTIS...WILLSS-WILD-WOODBINE-CIGARETTES-/362557696946

The result of yesterday's muddle means that there is a Three-Way Tie at the top of the league table. Exciting stuff!!

League Table
Curly 65 Points
Elmo 65 Points
Guyarab 65 Points
knobbydave 25 Points
Astoness 24 Points
allanbrum 16 Points
Mikejee 15 Points
A Sparks 12 Points
Williamstreeter 9 Points
Radiorails 9 Points
Pedrocut 7 Points
Morturn 4 Points
pjmburns 3 Points
Dave Riley 2 Points
jmadone 2 Points
Lady Penelope 2 Points
sospiri 2 Points
The Rest 0

Today's Photograph
Time for an inn sign ... this one was photographed in 1989. Name the establishment.

DEADLINE
PLEASE send your answer via PM message rather than posting on this page as it will spoil it for everyone else. Deadline for submissions is TOMORROW MORNING Friday 09.00hrs 17th July. Good luck!

107.jpg
 

Radiorails

master brummie
I quickly recognised the synagogue outline and believed the flower to be a clue. But I never came across a name other than the pub on the corner. Anyway the garden called.
 
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Elmo

master brummie
Yesterday, I saw the additional 'clue' in the top corner & as I never usually take these in, sometimes because either I'm dull lol or I think it's a curveball, I checked after I'd submitted my answer and as I thought I'd seen elsewhere on here, the woodbine was a yellow flowery thingy I was happy with my answer. See I am learning from this!
 
I received lots of submissions for yesterday's inn sign image. Almost everybody went for The Longboat at Cambrian Wharf/Kingston Row which was the wrong answer. I think the issue was that people were focusing on the narrow boat rather than the building. This is an artist's impression of the Old Union Mill at Holt Street, the public-house of the same name being next to the site. I can hear the groaning ......

No correct answer so no change to the table ...

League Table
Curly 65 Points
Elmo 65 Points
Guyarab 65 Points
knobbydave 25 Points
Astoness 24 Points
allanbrum 16 Points
Mikejee 15 Points
A Sparks 12 Points
Williamstreeter 9 Points
Radiorails 9 Points
Pedrocut 7 Points
Morturn 4 Points
pjmburns 3 Points
Dave Riley 2 Points
jmadone 2 Points
Lady Penelope 2 Points
sospiri 2 Points
The Rest 0

Today's Photograph
Back to between the wars for today's image. Name the pub?

DEADLINE
PLEASE send your answer via PM message rather than posting on this page as it will spoil it for everyone else. Deadline for submissions is TOMORROW MORNING Saturday 09.00hrs 18th July. Good luck!

108.jpg
 
Yesterday's image could and should have been saved for the Saturday Stinker but I couldn't resist being a little devious. On the previous day we had the inn sign of the Old Union Mill at Holt Street. Some folks may remember this pub on the corner of Heneage Street. This was in fact a replacement of the old Union Mill Inn that stood on the diagonally-opposite corner. And yesterday's rare image was indeed a photograph of the original Old Union Mill Inn. Naturally it was a Holt's house and the brewery could virtually roll the barrels along the road to the pub!

'Orrible quizmaster I hear you say. But look on the positive side .... the quiz is providing some valuable insights and new info for the BHF.

No correct answer so no change to the table ...

League Table
Curly 65 Points
Elmo 65 Points
Guyarab 65 Points
knobbydave 25 Points
Astoness 24 Points
allanbrum 16 Points
Mikejee 15 Points
A Sparks 12 Points
Williamstreeter 9 Points
Radiorails 9 Points
Pedrocut 7 Points
Morturn 4 Points
pjmburns 3 Points
Dave Riley 2 Points
jmadone 2 Points
Lady Penelope 2 Points
sospiri 2 Points
The Rest 0

Today's Photograph
After yesterday's super-tough challenge I should be a little easier on you for the Saturday Stinker. So, I am throwing in a 1950s building for you. Name the pub?

DEADLINE
PLEASE send your answer via PM message rather than posting on this page as it will spoil it for everyone else. Deadline for submissions is TOMORROW MORNING Sunday 09.00hrs 19th July. Good luck!

109.jpg
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Very kind of you. However, I have and I suggest others may have been too busy so far today to even look for the answer. :D
 

Elmo

master brummie
To be honest I only had a quick look say 20mins this morning for pubs I thought from memory it may have been! Will have another better look after I've eaten my takeaway which I'm still waiting to be delivered! As said earlier many of this era look the same, thanks Keiron for the clue, not sure it's gonna be much help lol
 
Can I go back to the Old Union Mill as I think it is quite important - I have just typed up this very brief / potted history of the mill itself to be added to my page for this pub :

The original Old Union Mill Inn stood next to the Old Union Mill on Holt Street. The mill was constructed in 1896-7. I imagine that the mill became known as 'old' when another mill operated by the same company was opened at Ladywood in 1813. Certainly the public-house was listed as the Old Union Mill Inn after the Napoleonic Wars. Indeed, it was through earlier conflicts with France that contributed to the construction of Union Mills in the UK.

Grain prices fluctuated throughout the 18th century but rose sharply in the 1790s. Poor harvests were a key factor but a nation at war exacerbated the need to import grain at higher prices than the domestic market. The increase in price affected bread, a staple of the working-class diet. Grain prices almost doubled between 1790 and 1795, fuelling some civil unrest in many parts of country.

Informal flour clubs sprang up in the 18th century, largely run by Friendly Societies. The sharp increase in prices of the early 1790s led to the formation of early co-operatives that, in many respects, were unincorporated joint stock companies. The Birmingham Bread and Flour Company was one such co-operative or Union Mill Society. Working-class people could afford to buy a £1 share in the society as they were allowed to pay in small weekly installments. Families were then provided with quotas of flour and/or bread at affordable prices, almost the amount it cost to produce. To prevent imbalance, the maximum number of shares that an individual could hold was set at 20.

By June 1796 the membership of the Union Mill was 1,360 spread across 6,279 shares. The capital raised enabled the construction of a new mill powered by a Boulton and Watt 16hp steam engine. Indeed, this was the first steam co-operative mill in the UK. Of the initial capital of £6,279 raised by the scheme, just over £5,145 was absorbed by buildings and machinery. Measuring some 60ft by 30ft, the three-storey mill had an adjoining bakehouse with a warehouse, pig sties, cart-house, engine-house and dwelling house. I presume the latter was for John Smith who, when he died in March 1837, was described as "the faithful, highly-valued and confidential conductor of the Old Union Mill Flour and Bread Company to whom the proprietors have to regret the loss of a truly honest servant." In the bakery John Smith worked alongside several assistants, an engineer, two carters, and a weigher.

Each year the committee of the Union Mill would present a report to the shareholders at an annual general meeting. Only members with more than five shares had any real say in the concern but, once all the fixed assets were paid for, each member would receive a dividend - and this was fairly reasonable when times were good. In some years dividends of up to ten per cent were distributed to the membership.

To facilitate the transportation of grain and other materials such as coal for the steam engine, the mill was erected next to the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham Canal Navigations which was excavated during the period of construction. The extension into the heart of Digbeth was not completed until 1799 but the section above Ashted Lock enabled transportation in the early years of the mill.
 
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