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Our childhood toys

Radiorails

master brummie
nice Alan we had 2 of them a red one and a green one. you put a penny or what ever, on his hand pressed the lever and he eat it.
I believe some banks issued them as an encouragement to save money rather than spend it. Today is reverse it seems, banks want you to be in hock to them. Anyway that particular item and the Robertsons jam item are not pc.
 

mbenne

master brummie
Not so much a toy but I had this exact same radio off my grandparents for Xmas 1964, a sign that I was growing up. Unfortunately, I found it before it had been wrapped and had to pretend I was surprised when I opened their present on Xmas Day. Like the fascination of having a torch I was endlessly turning it on and off and re-tuning the stations until the on off switch failed! It was my first and last transistor radio.

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Radiorails

master brummie
My father brought back a German torch when he returned from Norway in 1946. It was rectangular in shape (akin to a present day cycle light in shape). U2 batteries were needed, I think two of them. It had four options: clear - standard torch light and three slider lenses. Red, green and a deep blue. Sadly, like many things, they disappear over time.
He also brought back a German hand torch which had a lever which, when depressed rapidly, acted as a dynamo to power the light, which could be quite intense. It had a leather tab, similar to those on mens braces, so that it could be attached to a coat button. I believe this type of light was copied, in the UK, post WW2.
 

mw0njm.

brummie dude
Not so much a toy but I had this exact same radio off my grandparents for Xmas 1964, a sign that I was growing up. Unfortunately, I found it before it had been wrapped and had to pretend I was surprised when I opened their present on Xmas Day. Like the fascination of having a torch I was endlessly turning it on and off and re-tuning the stations until the on off switch failed! It was my first and last transistor radio.

View attachment 140268
sad. I had one and walked around with it stuck to my ear like people do now with mobile phones. but i was listening to Radio Luxembourg:)
 

mbenne

master brummie
Deja vu? My grandson had this for Xmas, following a recent visit to our son in London, and is insisting that we build it TODAY! All I need now are my glasses and plenty of patience. I fear that it will take a while lol. Rather than the old metal parts I think this is now mainly plastic?

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RobT

master brummie
How many of you bought one of these type of construction toys for about £5 from a petrol station?
They were made in East Germany in the 1970s?

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jmadone

master brummie
Earlier in this thread mn0njm posted a picture of a metal money box which I now can't find. I was trying to find an illustration of a money box that I had as a child. Finally found one and this is it.
bank-mechanical-creedmore-ba10100 (2).jpg
It is a either a French Foreign legionaire or a French Gendarme.
To operate it a spring loaded slide on the top of his rifle was pushed back until it locked then a coin was placed in front of this (Usually just an old 1d) When his foot was pushed down, the gun "fired" and the coin was shot into a slot in the hollow tree. I used to play with this for hours and money being a bit scarce to a four year old, anything tha would fit into the slot would be shot into the tree. I don't know whatever happened to it, I suppose it went the way of most of my childhood toys and disappeared over time.
 

A Sparks

master brummie
I never heard of Jaco, not sure I would have wanted one....but maybe, all those years ago. I saw one, or something very similar undergoing restoration on a recent tv programme. I do remember a friend having a money box of this style.View attachment 140264
We had one of those, I think it was my mother's, I'm not sure what happened to it!
Of course not very pc nowadays.
 

mbenne

master brummie
A very nostalgic day. I've thought about things that have been put to the back of my mind for years, like freebies in cereal packets and pestering my Mom to buy stuff that she would never entertain buying and me trying to convince her that I really wanted it and not because of the freebie. It never worked,of course, and as she always bought either Force wheat flakes or Quaker oats the chances of a freebie were pretty slim. Also, being an only child it would be weeks before she bought another packet of cereals and the offer would most likely have ended. So I was really envious of my mate having a submarine out of a packet of Kellogg's something or other. We were fascinated by the little sub bobbing up and down in a kilner jar on their kitchen shelf - powered by baking soda. Even if I had got one my Mom never bought baking soda so it would have been pointless! I've just looked for the sub and also came across this amusing letter too......
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My Nan was always a soft touch though and I did get her to buy sugar puffs as they were offering glow in the dark figures! The background was a cut out from the back of the cereal packet - this one was from the early 60's. You can only eat so many packets of anything in a short space of time before the taste or the offer wears off so I only managed to collect the ghost, cat and to my disappointment the clock!
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Spargone

master brummie
Until die-cast and plastic models became common a lot of toys were tin-plate with 'internal' details painted on the outside, which looked OK from the front or the side but not from a three-quarter view. The cardboard models printed on cereal packets were similar in principle so quite acceptable as 'freebies', no-one would want them now I expect.

Weetabix often had model lorries and Kellogg's must have run their 'big game' trophy series many, many times. I think it was Kellogg's that produced a fairground series too, the helter-skelter sticking in my mind. New cereal brands were usually promoted with toys in-the-bag. Wasn't Bite-sized Shredded Wheat called 'Cubs' originally? It had various spy/detective toys like coding discs and magnifying glasses. Even 'boring' cereals like Scott's Porridge Oats joined in the fun. I remember a view of Edinburgh Castle that was assembled inside the box, lit from cut-outs in the box side and viewed from the open box end. My dad stuck coloured cellophane over the windows to make the view more like Tattoo times. That reminds me that Kellogg's must have produced little stage sets many times, the finished result was like a little 3-D picture that you could hang on the wall (alongside all your animal heads?). Christmas chocolate selection boxes also went in for 'added-value' cardboard cut-out toys.
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
we had hours of fun with one of these horse racing games with lead horses...had to clamp it to each end of the table turn the handle and watch them go...didnt half make a racket when we turned the handleView attachment 140252...wish i still had ours this one is going for £130 on ebay and that is with 2 horses missing...happy days

lyn
I always wanted one of those as a kid , I used to stare into the window of Clapshaw and Cleave in Margaret St , where the old Central library used to be
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
We must all have been the owners of large arsenals of cap and spud guns over the years and I know I've had all of the ones below. I suppose it must have been a spin off from the war years and the influence of endless american cowboy series shown on 50's and 60's TV but we always seemed to be playing war games or cowboys and Indians - I even had a Davy Crocket hat!. My Dan Dare space pistol was a bit of an embarrassment as it was too futuristic but if you didn't have anything suitable then you made pretend or improvised. One of the older lads had a length of metal tube and old spark plugs as dummy ammunition. He used this as a Bazooka or Mortar, depending on the state of play. We were most impressed and everyone wanted to be on his side!

Ammunition for our cap guns could be bought from shops at both ends of our road at Wally Goode's sweet shop and Woodroffes (but not on Sundays!). Woodroffes was also a hardware shop and in later years was where we bought pellets for out Gat air pistols.

I dread to think how many cap rockets have blocked the guttering on the roof at home as that's where most of them seemed to end up!

Now my grandson plays with Nerf guns and insists I join in. As he always chooses the best armoury I have to improvise using the tube off the vacuum cleaner!!!
View attachment 140260
I used to borrow my mates Buntline special , boy oh boy did I feel like Wyatt Earp on the telly (played by Hugh O'Brian) in the holster strapped to my leg just like Wyatt . Only trouble was he never had Broad St and the big edging blocks of the Hall of Memory like I did . You look at me the wrong way friend and I'll fill you full of lead , then it was time to go back to see what Mom was cooking for dinner in the chuck wagon . The Buntline by the way was a pistol with a barrel about a foot long
 

RobT

master brummie
I used to borrow my mates Buntline special , boy oh boy did I feel like Wyatt Earp on the telly (played by Hugh O'Brian) in the holster strapped to my leg just like Wyatt . Only trouble was he never had Broad St and the big edging blocks of the Hall of Memory like I did . You look at me the wrong way friend and I'll fill you full of lead , then it was time to go back to see what Mom was cooking for dinner in the chuck wagon . The Buntline by the way was a pistol with a barrel about a foot long
gun.jpg
 

Richarddye

master brummie
we had hours of fun with one of these horse racing games with lead horses...had to clamp it to each end of the table turn the handle and watch them go...didnt half make a racket when we turned the handleView attachment 140252...wish i still had ours this one is going for £130 on ebay and that is with 2 horses missing...happy days

lyn
I loved that game although I was never lucky enough to own one!
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
Interesting that in actual fact although there were five Buntline specials, there is no proof that Earp ever carried one. Ned Buntline was a dime novelist who wrote Westerns making heroes of people like Earp, Cody et al and commissioned the guns from Colt. Some other firearms manufacturers did make long barrel guns and apparently in the fifties Colt did extend the length of their Navy revolver. There is some interesting history on Google. When I was doing my national service, I had to fire off and condemn some weapons, amongst them was a Webley revolver, so I tried quick draw and fire. An almost impossible task, landed on my back twice, jarred my arm and just missed my foot. Nuff said


Bob Davis
 
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