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Is This Your Motor?

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
OOM is a March 1954 Wolseley 4/44.

Lovely cars, the 15/50 was a bit better with the bigger and more robust BMC engine, but the one to have was the MG Magnette, Z Series, especially the ZB Varitone with the wrap around rear screen

PNX is another Velox, registered in Warks in June 1954. The clue is the badge above the radiator grille, the one of the Wyvern being smaller.
 
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Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
Which Berkeley is it? It may be that some of the parts are motorcycle origin, or pinched from other small cars. If it’s any consolation, things could be worse, there’s a Bentley in bits in my garage!
 
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brenda barr

master brummie
l have no idea about cars etc.....Ron said his Berkeley is a 1958 B60 model with a an excelsior 2 Stroke eng 328cc at the moment hes working on the engine but so far the paint has been stripped off it also Ron has sandplasted the frame, but it all takes time and money....Brenda
 

brenda barr

master brummie
Which Berkeley is it? It may be that some of the parts are motorcycle origin, or pinched from other small cars. If it’s any consolation, things could be worse, there’s a Bentley in bits in my garage!
l,ll try once again to answer your question...Rons Berkeley is a 1958 B60 model with a excelsior eng 2Stroke 328cc so far the paint has been stripped off also the frame has been sandblasted oh had new tyres it all takes and money Brenda
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
Thanks. Getting hold of spares for a low volume car is always difficult, and, as you say it costs money. With the Bentley, most parts are easily found, it’s paying for them and, in my case, finding appropriately skilled people to work on the body.
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
I had a VW LT 35 van for sale, because it was a class 7 vehicle it had to go to a government testing station (at that time) for the mot test, it failed on the handbrake not being up to standard.

The tester said he needed to discus it with the manager because there was "something specific'" about this model.

When he came back he told me that the vehicle couldn't meet the specification because of its design, so the department of transport had conceded that it would be allowed to pass at a lower level than that required by the UK spec. :mad:
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
The Gough St cars are a 1935-37 Morris Eight, ( Cambridgeshire Aug 1936} a 1953 - 56 Austin A30, (West Sussex, Jan 1953) and an early 50s Morris Minor.

The Fords are a 1953 - 59 Popular, (actually Worcs Jan 1956) and a 1956-8 Consul Mk2. (The Consul has a Croydon plate, but I can’t work out what the all important first letter is.) There was a bit of a facelift on the Consul, I think this car pre-dates it. My first car was a Popular of identical shape bought from Lloyd’s Garage in Stafford for £55. I knew the previous owner, who had traded it in against a new Ford Anglia in 1966.
 
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mw0njm.

Brummie dude
I had a austin 7, i took it for a mot. the tester said it would not pass. the handbrake had a adjuster on it. i told him one was allowed per cable. after a bit of head scratching hummimg and harring he give me the mot.1595429049133.png
1595428771353.png
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
Pete,

I think you might be more likely to find a gramophone than an engine!

Stan and Ollie must have been very good for the Ford sales figures, thinking of the quantity of Model Ts they destroyed in the films.
 

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
ROA, 12/54 to 3/55 Birmingham commercial vehicle plate on a Hillman Husky estate.

HOM, 11/47 to 2/48 Birmingham plate on a Humber Super Snipe.

A Fordson (or Thames) 10cwt van shows us its back. There was a name change in the early 50s. These vans were in production from 1938 until 1956, a few even being built during WW2. By ‘56 they were totally out of date, a top speed of only about 35mph making them suitable for urban delivery work at best. The replacement van which used the Consul Mk2 mechanical parts was a much better proposition.
 
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