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In the garden 2022

Eric Gibson

master brummie
When I planted this it was labelled blackcurrant, it's loaded with fruit but are they under ripe blackcurrants or redcurrants?
 

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MWS

master brummie
Why is blackcurrant more popular than redcurrant? Can't remember ever seeing juice or jam of the latter.
 

johnny082

master brummie
They are indeed beautiful Stokkie. I have tried several times to grow Sweet Peas without success. A friend had one for years [I always thought they were annuals]. Any hints and tips would be appreciated.
 

Stokkie

master brummie
They are indeed beautiful Stokkie. I have tried several times to grow Sweet Peas without success. A friend had one for years [I always thought they were annuals]. Any hints and tips would be appreciated.
Johnny, I have to confess that for the first time ever, I didn't sow seed this year as my father in law died and we had to clear his house and I was walking his dog. So at the end of April I looked for Matucana or Cupani (these have the strongest scent) plug plants. Sarah Raven had a sale, a week later I had 36 plants including Venetian heritage mix. Watered well, planted in a big container and prepared ground. Melcourt SylvaGrow peat free multi-purpose with added John Innes. Watered with tap-water. You want to grow them up a support, pea sticks or roughened canes. Tie the plants in with raffia or twine. Mine came with the tips pinched out already so they bush out. This is the easy, but expensive way. You can get much cheaper plants from most garden centres but not usually the heritage varieties.







 

Stokkie

master brummie
Johnny, I have to confess that for the first time ever, I didn't sow seed this year as my father in law died and we had to clear his house and I was walking his dog. So at the end of April I looked for Matucana or Cupani (these have the strongest scent) plug plants. Sarah Raven had a sale, a week later I had 36 plants including Venetian heritage mix. Watered well, planted in a big container and prepared ground. Melcourt SylvaGrow peat free multi-purpose with added John Innes. Watered with tap-water. You want to grow them up a support, pea sticks or roughened canes. Tie the plants in with raffia or twine. Mine came with the tips pinched out already so they bush out. This is the easy, but expensive way. You can get much cheaper plants from most garden centres but not usually the heritage varieties.







Johnny, you are growing from seed as I aways have. Do you have a cold frame or a heated propagator? I have a small cold greenhouse. I always nick the seeds with a sharp knife removing a bit of the seed coat avoiding the eye. Then I soak seeds overnight before planting into sweet pea tubes, or root trainers. You can use toilet roll cardboard middles. These go into the propagator in the dark until two leaves show. Then to windowsill, conservatory then greenhouse/ frame to harden off. Watch for white mould. Avoid saved rain water until established. Then plant out when all frosts have gone. Seeds have instructions on the back of the packet. They like sun, warmth and water. Feed with dilute seaweed fertiliser later in season.
 
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Smudger

master brummie
They are indeed beautiful Stokkie. I have tried several times to grow Sweet Peas without success. A friend had one for years [I always thought they were annuals]. Any hints and tips would be appreciated.
You can get perennial sweet peas. Look the same as annual type but sadly with no scent.
 

Stokkie

master brummie
There is also a sweet pea society. https://www.sweetpeas.org.uk/hints-on-growing/growing-sweet-peas/. I've followed this in the past. Suttons and Thompson & Morgan have advice too. https://www.sweetpeas.org.uk/hints-on-growing/growing-sweet-peas/
Sometimes, it's the weather. I found a heated propagator was a real break-through. Some nick the seeds others never do. Talk to older gardeners in your area and visit flower shows to ask the sweet pea experts there. Once you have them in flower, keep cutting them. Don't let them set seed, unless you want to save it. The plant will stop flowering.
 
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