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I Wonder What She's Thinking?

Alberta

Super Moderator
Staff member
Reading your lovely stories this week has made me happy and also sad, especially the Tennyson quote because 2 weeks ago we found out that our little Alice has a bladder tumour.
We have always had 2 Yorkies, at the moment the largest we have ever owned our Bradley age 4 and our tiny Alice age 8.
The tumour is inoperable because it is in the wall of the bladder and she is too tiny to survive the op.
We do not know how long we have ,hopefully quite a while yet.
She is on low dose anti inflammatories and has an injection every Tuesday to check the growth of the tumour.
She is happy, running on her walks, barking in the window at passers by and fighting Bradley for the toys.
Her only problem, she is peeing for Britain so has gone back to puppy pads and wakes up a couple of times in the night to use them.
We know that in the future we shall have a decision to make and, like most of you here know, it is not an easy one but none of us would see our 'babies' suffer in pain.
At the present time we have 2 happy Yorkies one of which is becoming very ,very spoilt ,lol.
 
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mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Sorry to hear that Alberta. I well know how playful and affectionate yorkies are, and how difficult it is when they leave us
 

Smudger

master brummie
Their pure happiness when they see us is one of the things I love about having a dog and can't understand how people can be cruel to animals. It breaks my heart when you see badly treated dogs on the TV who are usually so forgiving and willing to please the owners who maltreat them.

I believe the maximum prison sentence for animal cruelty is 6 months, which means they will probably be released after 3 months. These prison sentences are far too lenient, & personally i would like to see these offenders strung up by their useless testicles or maybe put in the old fashioned stocks for a good period so we can pelt them with good old doggy poo, or horse poo! But that`s probably against their human rights.
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
Bewdley, That is the one snag of having a dog (or cat), they have a comparative short life compared to ours, consequently we have the upset of losing them, this has happened numerous times in my fairly long life (86yo) and I say 'never again' but within a short time another dog or cat comes into my life, especially now I live by myself since losing my Wife. Eric
 

bewdley

master brummie
Reading your lovely stories this week has made me happy and also sad, especially the Tennyson quote because 2 weeks ago we found out that our little Alice has a bladder tumour.
We have always had 2 Yorkies, at the moment the largest we have ever owned our Bradley age 4 and our tiny Alice age 8.
The tumour is inoperable because it is in the wall of the bladder and she is too tiny to survive the op.
We do not know how long we have ,hopefully quite a while yet.
She is on low dose anti inflammatories and has an injection every Tuesday to check the growth of the tumour.
She is happy, running on her walks, barking in the window at passers by and fighting Bradley for the toys.
Her only problem, she is peeing for Britain so has gone back to puppy pads and wakes up a couple of times in the night to use them.
We know that in the future we shall have a decision to make and, like most of you here know, it is not an easy one but none of us would see our 'babies' suffer in pain.
At the present time we have 2 happy Yorkies one of which is becoming very ,very spoilt ,lol.

Oh my Alberta I'm so sorry this is happening to Alice and I hope she keeps well and pain free. As long as she is enjoying her life and doing what she loves you can't do much else for her except spoil her rotten.

You and Alice will know when the time comes: the last act of love you can do for her.

Another of our Dobes, Murphy, had leukaemia and we lost him just after his 3rd birthday. In hindsight we should have let him go sooner, but he was such a fighter and had so many blood transfusions and invasive investigations. He was rather an anomaly at the vets and they tried so hard for him too.

One of the side effects of his treatment was he lost control of his bladder and used to pee everywhere so we turned to disposable nappies slung under him like a hammock with elastic over his back to keep them in position. They worked a treat and he was so much more relaxed as he became quite stressed when he had an accident. I'm not sure how this would work with Alice, due to her size and the differences between male and female dogs.

When our dobie girls were in season, before they were spayed, we used the pants you can buy for them and put pads inside - I suppose you could try this if she gets to the stage where she can't hold her bladder.

Keep strong and make happy memories. All the best Josie
 

bewdley

master brummie
Bewdley, That is the one snag of having a dog (or cat), they have a comparative short life compared to ours, consequently we have the upset of losing them, this has happened numerous times in my fairly long life (86yo) and I say 'never again' but within a short time another dog or cat comes into my life, especially now I live by myself since losing my Wife. Eric

Yes Eric it is true that we will (hopefully) outlive our pets, but there's no telling how long they will live for, some go before their time and others carry on for ever. We had a wonderful Manchester Terrier pup when I was 3 and she died aged 19 just after I had married and left home. She was better than a sister and mum and dad's house never felt the same after she had gone.

Losing a pet as a child is, I think, a way of preparing us to cope with the loss of a loved one as we get older in that we learn to recognise feelings of loss and learn that eventually we will remember with love and happiness and yes sadness but the memories are good.

Having a pet as company helps to motivate us to carry on following the loss of someone close, especially if we live alone.

All the best Josie
 

Di.Poppitt

master brummie
I am so sorry to hear that Alice has a tumour, something we all dread the loss of our lovely pets. We lost our Hillie a few days before Christmas, I don't think I have ever cried so much, I had to get up in the night because I was sobbing and Brian was awake with me. She was full of tumours but we had no idea until she didn't want to walk and then a few days later she stopped eating. We were all with her when the vet put her gently to sleep. Such a lovely girl, I won't ever stop missing her.
 

Alberta

Super Moderator
Staff member
Di, I am so sorry to her about Hillie, I know how much she meant to you.
People who have never lost a pet have no idea the pain it causes.
We know that when Alice is unable to pee any more the time has come so for now I am so happy to get up to see the puddles on the puppy pads.
You would never know there was anything wrong with her,she leaps on to the back of the sofa to tell people they have no right to walk past her house,lol.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
For so many of us the loss of a pet is a catastrophe equal to the loss of a loved person. It does take time to come to terms with it all. No words, usually, are that much help; however to share a sorrow is always very worthwhile.
My back garden has eleven dogs, many cats buried there whereas the front garden has hamsters and birds ( including dead wild birds).
Our present dog, a short haired a farm type dog of four years, came to us from an animal shelter. We know his provenance.
 

Di.Poppitt

master brummie
I hope Alice has a lovely long time with you Alberta.
I feel such a whimp I can't think Hillie's name without blubbing.

Like you Alan and I know lots more of us on the Forum, have lovely memories of our faithful animals. We've had horses too and when they go it is traumatic, but of them all Hillie is the shinning star. She loved everybody, people, animals, not to mention babies. I never will forget the first time she looked into a pushchair and saw the little smiling face peeking out at her. She would have brought it home if she could have.

DSC00265.jpg R.I.P. Hillie P0ppitt 2003 to 2016
 
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Smudger

master brummie
It`s kinda sad how we are influenced by looks. This poor dog is struggling to find someone to take him home & love him. I used to have a bulldog, & so many people shied away from him, presumably scared by his looks yet he was really soft & friendly. There are so many attractive people with little or no talent who because of their looks become "celebrities". There was a lad at school who had a hare-lip & he was abused because of it, yet he played in our local cricket team & you couldn`t wish to meet a nicer lad. What a shallow lot we humans are.Dog.PNG
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
boxer.jpg
We had a white boxer dog about 35 years ago, he was so protective it was unbelievable. If I spoke too sternly to our son the dog, Burt was his name, would growl quietly at me. We always had a dog before I was married and my wife's Mom had two when we moved in with her but I never knew one like this boxer. On a sunny day he would sit by the chain link fence until the woman next door gave him a dish of ice cream, if the sun was not shining he would not sit there. One day he fell down the stairs and could not get up so we picked him up in a blanket and took him to the vet we always used. He told us he thought it would be cancer so he admitted the dog and sent Xray images of the dogs spine to a specialist who said it was inoperable cancer. The cost was enormous but the pleasure Burt gave us made the cost quite acceptable. I have turned a photo of him into a X. Stitch pattern which is completed and hanging on the wall. The dog pictured above is not ours but I thought it was funny.
 
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