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Gone out of fashion

Terence David Lines

master brummie
My grandmother had a smaller one than the one above. Her house had a bath. The galvanised one was used to put the Shallots in after we peeled them in October, then salt shook over the top which was then covered with fresh water left in front of the open fire to keep it warm. 24 hours later drained Shallots put in jars and her own made spiced vinegar added plus two teaspoons of soft brown sugar added this would keep the Shallots crisp.
 

johnny082

master brummie
We had a smaller galvanised bath which was used regularly despite having a bathroom [with a bath]. Water heated from the old black fire grate so in summer Mom used to heat the water in the big gas boiler situated in the corner of the kitchen. I always had to go in the bath after my brother to save heating more water. Wonder what todays youngsters would make of it
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
dont see these much now
View attachment 170144
Mainly because of white finger, but they are still required in streetworks training and assessment and in a lot of cases now they are petrol driven, so do not need the compressor. I remember when I ran a plant hire company, we had one and two toolers as standards, but also a bigger CP four tooler which spent most of its life out on hire.
Thanks for the memory. When I got married, my best man and mate tied my tie for me and he used a Windsor knot because he said it looked neater than the normal knot. I have no idea how he tied it, and even today I could not tie one. When I took the tie off, I pulled it over my head still tied, and it hangs in the wardrobe to this day, Windsor knotted, ready to be put on again. That would be 1971.
Andrew.
Never have used any other knot than a Windsor and have not worn a tie for about three years, so this topic sent me to my ties and yes can still tie a Windsor knot.

But on thè subject of the post, have you noticed you can no longer get spares and replacement ironmongery parts and bits and pieces? Only a complete replacement piece wrapped in plastic

Bob
 
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Bob Davis

Bob Davis
It is truly remarkable how quiet their companion air compressors are now.

Hydraulic power made a big change in the machines doing construction work. Something not seen now, but common from Victorian days, are excavators with scissor-action jibs. It probably started with the JCB 'diggers' and then spread larger and larger machines.

View attachment 170147
Prior to JCB, this looks like an American machine, but I the UK Ruysto Bucyruse were king, hard to beat an RB22 face shovel, I last used one, an old dog ,from the fifties in 1991. You knew at the end of the day, it was not operated by hydraulics.
Bob
 

Richard Dye

master brummie
Prior to JCB, this looks like an American machine, but I the UK Ruysto Bucyruse were king, hard to beat an RB22 face shovel, I last used one, an old dog ,from the fifties in 1991. You knew at the end of the day, it was not operated by hydraulics.
Bob
Bob, you are correct Bucyrus (sp) is an American based company that is alive andwell.
 

MartinS

master brummie
My grandmother had a smaller one than the one above. Her house had a bath. The galvanised one was used to put the Shallots in after we peeled them in October, then salt shook over the top which was then covered with fresh water left in front of the open fire to keep it warm. 24 hours later drained Shallots put in jars and her own made spiced vinegar added plus two teaspoons of soft brown sugar added this would keep the Shallots crisp.
When I was a nipper, I remember being bathed in the galvanised bath by my Mom in my Nan's kitchen, right in front of the Dometic stove in their old house in Aston. It was nice and toasty warm in there!

Any time the old Steptoe and Son show came on TV over the years, it always made me chuckle with old Albert in the tub with the pickled onions, when Harold walked in on him!

It is hard to believe those two couldn't stand each other in real life! What an act.

Nan died in 1956 when I was just 4 years old, but the memories of that old house and taking a bath in the kitchen, are etched in my memory as clear as ever.

I also remember my Dad taking a chamber pot down to the off license on Allesley Street for his Dad draught beer. I went with him a couple of times, watched the beer being pumped.
 
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