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Give us yer donny

jonnybrowne

master brummie
Be that as it may, I’m really not convinced that “donny” comes from either a corruption of the French for “give” imported by WW1 soldiers returning from France - if that were the case it would surely have come into use across the UK, not just the West Midlands - or as has been previously suggested, an abbreviation of the Irish expression “donnybrook” for fists because again I wouldn’t expect that to have been confined to the West Midlands.

My theory, for what it’s worth, is that its origins were within one community and its use just spread within the wider area. We’ll probably never know for sure.
 
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Nico

master brummie
So was I

Bob
I have just asked my partner who is French. Cul de sac means just what you have all said, the bottom of the bag, and bottom like a rear end. But is is not rude. The French do not get offended it seems and just tell it like it is. As we used to here - my opinion. They have crottes and crottins de chevres, goat's poo and little goat's poo to be polite, which are small goat cheeses. Crottes au chocolat, little dark chocolates shaped liked well....poo. Pet de souer. Nun's wind shall I say being polite again. Little pastry cinnamon swirls . Now they say fesse de bouc, billy goat's bum for FaceBook.

Nan said donny ands, and donnies, being Black country. She also said gnat's p....I can't put here, for weak tea, and maids; water. Very descriptive was Nan.The French say p...de chat. Cat. For the same.I got these from my partner's older relatives who were very direct too. Nan stayed in a guest house once the landlady asked if they wanted a drap o' wet on there dinner, meaning gravy.
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
I have just asked my partner who is French. Cul de sac means just what you have all said, the bottom of the bag, and bottom like a rear end. But is is not rude. The French do not get offended it seems and just tell it like it is. As we used to here - my opinion. They have crottes and crottins de chevres, goat's poo and little goat's poo to be polite, which are small goat cheeses. Crottes au chocolat, little dark chocolates shaped liked well....poo. Pet de souer. Nun's wind shall I say being polite again. Little pastry cinnamon swirls . Now they say fesse de bouc, billy goat's bum for FaceBook.

Nan said donny ands, and donnies, being Black country. She also said gnat's p....I can't put here, for weak tea, and maids; water. Very descriptive was Nan.The French say p...de chat. Cat. For the same.I got these from my partner's older relatives who were very direct too. Nan stayed in a guest house once the landlady asked if they wanted a drap o' wet on there dinner, meaning gravy.
de la bouche du cheval.

Merci Monsieur

Bob
 

Nico

master brummie
cul-de-sac.. a street or passage closed at one end
blind alley
a street that is designed to connect to another street only at one end
a situation that leads nowhere:
I noticed when I was over there they have a type of street, Passe de whatever, a passage, and Impasse de whatever which I was told are cul de sacs also.
 

Nico

master brummie
Said of one of my great aunties who was very eccentric, by her mother, "she was the scrapings of the pot." The last child.
Grandad's mum kept pigs and the runt of one of the litters she called the nisgal. Not sure of the spelling.
My great gran used to say pull yer trouser bags up.
Nan had a rhyme, gooin round the ouses pullin up yer trowsiz.
 
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