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Give us yer donny

jonnybrowne

master brummie
My Mother always said FANDAZZYDOBY
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Just spent ages wondering where I've heard that before Ed, then it came to mind the Crankies.
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Yes, I'd say the origin (blame??!!!) lies with the Crankies.
 
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jonnybrowne

master brummie
My Nan used to threaten to call Copper Ni-Ni if the kids in our family didn't behave (either that or she'd tell us we'd be off to the orphanage in Pype Hayes Park...). Anyone else come across that?
 
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bullring boy

master brummie
My mum always used to say "give us yer donny" when we had to wash our hands. I think it's almost certainly from the French word "donner" - "to give."
My dad always called a funnel a tundish, an off-licence was an outdoor, we used to eat pikelets, not crumpets, and it was a piece, not a sandwich. I did get confused as a child when my dad would say "Come on, we're going to visit our kid," as we set out to see one of my uncles. I always assumed I was the kid. When I went to university, I discovered a whole new world. The other students, mainly from the home counties, couldn't understand my accent or my vocabulary. I remember during one meal in the hall of residence, looking at my plate I said to the young lady next to me "We're having faggots for tea tonight then." She seemed confused until I pointed to the contents of my plate. "Oh you mean savoury ducks," she replied, "and I suppose you mean supper, not tea." I guess that's when my induction into the world of posh began!
 

Edifi

master brummie
We were talking about S&U not long ago and out of the blue I happened to say WE HAD THINGS ON THE KNOCK.My wife said I haven't heard that for years..
 

Edifi

master brummie
Another thing .While on the phone my wife said to her cousin she had some Rolls from the bakers delivered. Her cousin didn't know what she meant. She then said you mean COBS
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
I always remember that whichever Woolworths you went into, the Kali counter was always the first counter on the right inside the door. I remember as kids we could not afford Sherbet, which was a white powder sweet sold in packets with a stick of liquorice, so we used to buy Kali which was yellow and sold officially as lemonade powder.
 

JohnJames

master brummie
" Round the Wrekin" and "Bottle of Pop" were common Brummie saying when I was growing up. In the film 'Le Mans 1966' Christian Bale playing the Brummie racing driver Ken Miles uses both both of these expressions . His Brummie accent was pretty good as well. At one point in the film his son appears in a Villa top that looked right for the period.
 

jonnybrowne

master brummie
My mum always used to say "give us yer donny" when we had to wash our hands. I think it's almost certainly from the French word "donner" - "to give."
My dad always called a funnel a tundish, an off-licence was an outdoor, we used to eat pikelets, not crumpets, and it was a piece, not a sandwich. I did get confused as a child when my dad would say "Come on, we're going to visit our kid," as we set out to see one of my uncles. I always assumed I was the kid. When I went to university, I discovered a whole new world. The other students, mainly from the home counties, couldn't understand my accent or my vocabulary. I remember during one meal in the hall of residence, looking at my plate I said to the young lady next to me "We're having faggots for tea tonight then." She seemed confused until I pointed to the contents of my plate. "Oh you mean savoury ducks," she replied, "and I suppose you mean supper, not tea." I guess that's when my induction into the world of posh began!
Yes, we used to go to the outdoor, have a piece - or a cob - for our dinner, and it was always pikelets, never crumpets - although funnily enough, my wife's from North Yorkshire and also calls them pikelets.

Loved the savoury duck story - a very similar thing happened to me a few years ago. I was in the office on the phone to Mrs. Jonny and we were having our usual 4pm conversation about that evening's catering arrangements: I said "so - what do you fancy for tea then" after which my boss, a posh home counties type, looked over the screen and asked me why I always talked to my wife every afternoon about drinking tea. I explained that tea was what we ate in the evening, whereupon I was told "Oh you mean your SUPPER". I confused him further by telling him "no, no, supper's the snack you have before you go to bed".
 

jonnybrowne

master brummie
" Round the Wrekin" and "Bottle of Pop" were common Brummie saying when I was growing up. In the film 'Le Mans 1966' Christian Bale playing the Brummie racing driver Ken Miles uses both both of these expressions . His Brummie accent was pretty good as well. At one point in the film his son appears in a Villa top that looked right for the period.
My uncle tells a lovely story about when he changed jobs years ago, moving to an organisation based in Shrewsbury. On his first day the drive to his new office proved quite complicated and when he got to work he said he'd been all round the Wrekin - his astonished colleague then asked him why he'd gone all that way!
 
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bullring boy

master brummie
When I was a kid at Raddlebarn Primary School, if we were playing a game in the playground and wanted to pause the game to talk or negotiate we'd shout out "Barley!" and everyone would stop, gather round and listen to what we had to say. Sometimes we also held up crossed fingers. When talking about this with friends from other part of the country they also had a special word, but never "Barley." I've come across "Feyknights" in the north of England, "Pax" in the south and also "Crusoes." is Barley something used across Birmingham or was it just in my school? Is it a corruption of "Parley?" And I guess that comes from the French "Parler" to talk or discuss.
 

A Sparks

master brummie
My uncle tells a lovely story about when he changed jobs years ago, moving to an organisation based in Shrewsbury. On his first day the drive to his new office proved quite complicated and when he got to work he said he'd been all round the Wrekin - his astonished colleague then asked him why he'd gone all that way!
I'm wondering if people from Shropshire use that phrase - I worked (in London) with a girl who came from that county but she had never heard of the saying 'round the Wrekin' !
 
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