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ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
No problem. I noticed in the Mail Extra that is said this Carl Chinn would include Easy Hill, so got a copy of the Mail.

There was no Broad Street in the late 18th century according to that.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
easy row 2nd april 1903..oringinally known as the hill..it was sometime in the mid 1760s before easy hill came into being..perhaps its most famous resident was the printer john baskerville and the possible home of mr winkle in charles dickens pickwick papers...the photograph show easy row at the junction with edmund streeet... this is now the site of the central library and once again i must say that these buildings hardly look as though they are falling down around ones ears....its a crying shame....
 
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ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
What happened to that maginificent decorated looking lamppost?

Yes it is, especially as it's replacement may get pulled down after 2013.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
What happened to that maginificent decorated looking lamppost?

Yes it is, especially as it's replacement may get pulled down after 2013.
will they ever learn ell...the lamp post was probably melted down...
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
If only they listed it back then ...

All they cared about back then was the Inner Ring Road, building overpasses and subways.
 

Top Cat

proper brummie kid
Hello!
Could anybody tell me exactly where Easy Row ran, in conjunction with the present road layout? Also, were the buildings along it destroyed to make the ringway?
Thankyou!:frog:
 

sylviasayers

master brummie
Topcat don't know if this answers your question but in my old Wakelins Guide it says Easy Row ran from 26 Paradise Street to Cambridge Street, B1 central Birmingham.
 

leslam

Brummie by marriage
If you enter "Easy Row" in the Search box (top right), it shows a number of East Row thread, including the following:

https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=35800&highlight=Easy+Row

https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=36999&highlight=Easy+Row

https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=28867&highlight=Easy+Row

Unfortunately the pictures on several of these threads have not yet been replaced.

This map from 1795 shows it quite well. I do have maps and auction particulars for Easy Row in the 1860s (complete with who bought each property) - my husband's great great grandfather went to the auctions and the papers have survived! Maybe one day I will get round to scanning them all and adding them on here!

 

Attachments

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Top Cat

proper brummie kid
If you enter "Easy Row" in the Search box (top right), it shows a number of East Row thread, including the following:

https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=35800&highlight=Easy+Row

https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=36999&highlight=Easy+Row

https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=28867&highlight=Easy+Row

Unfortunately the pictures on several of these threads have not yet been replaced.

This map from 1795 shows it quite well. I do have maps and auction particulars for Easy Row in the 1860s (complete with who bought each property) - my husband's great great grandfather went to the auctions and the papers have survived! Maybe one day I will get round to scanning them all and adding them on here!


Great stuff-thankyou. Shall enjoy perusing this:encouragement:
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi top cat
Broad street was originally lined with Georgian houses but as the wealthy moved out they was converted. Into commercial premises
,from easy row one can see the old crown inn built in 1771,
On the corner of king Edwards place where henry. Mitchell. Commenced breeding before moving to cape hill
Beyond is the unitarian church of the messiah built in1865 and demolished 1978
I have got to
Most card pictures of broad street ,from five ways towards the centre of Birmingham was originally called Halesowen lane, renamed Islington
And finally becoming broad street in the mid 19 the century and may I had the woodman became the first pub to be called O'Neil's on broad street
In the early seventys it was the first one in the city before other O'Neil's set up
I have got two pictures of the very first shops set up on broad street for them years best wishes astonian,,,,
 

Dave89

master brummie
Hi John,

Yes, like you, I used to enjoy the same walk. I worked in Newhall Street in the early sixties, and I would walk up Edmund Street,
then turn left into Easy Row, past the Woodman, (there was a big Radio/TV shop on the same side), then left into Paradise St, and
down to the back of the Town Hall. Then turned left into Ratcliffe Place, and up to the fountain. Do you remember the
bronze Standard measures by the steps up to Edmund St. And sometimes Students? would put detergent in Chamberlain's fountain
and the whole thing would foam up. I remember a violin shop, but just in the little street at the far end of the Hall of Memory
gardens behind those massive stone shelters with bench seats at the back.

Happy days!

Kind regards

Dave
 

John Hinks

New Member
Hi Dave,

I'd forgotten those bronze measures but can recall them vaguely. I do remember the fountain being very frothy sometimes! There was also a little war memorial with a seat either side and a springbok (it must have been South African) near the fountain. It used to be a meeting-place for 'beatniks' - remember them?! I wonder what happened to that memorial - and the beatniks!

Maybe the violin shop moved. I can definitely remember one very near the Woodman. I remember that big stone shelter. Just behind it was a car showroom and I used to go to an evening class (German O-level) in a room above it (which was part of Matthew Boulton Technical College) in about 1962/63.

Happy days indeed!

John
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thought I’d revive this thread with few historical images. The first three must be around 1950s/60s - maybe someone can be more accurate
C3514836-7A7B-480A-88E9-91D761BA8E0E.jpegE501C543-7941-4B74-8C9A-AE1592F9FB26.jpegFD3EC2E3-8F48-4852-AFC1-4AC3AE9532B8.jpeg

Then we’re very familiar with Phyllis Nicklin’s 1960s view.

3A6C7D49-0B71-40AB-AA97-B67D2689D413.jpeg

And finally a sketch produced in the 1950s - a travesty that the terrace was lost. Even then it was recognised as an important row of building. But alas, the Inner Ring Road won on that one. Viv.

8EE40EF3-DFA0-4C9E-81E5-6F7902F8FBE5.jpeg9F54895E-5A4C-46FD-B047-5B26508FCF74.jpeg
 

Williamstreeter

master brummie
Thought I’d revive this thread with few historical images. The first three must be around 1950s/60s - maybe someone can be more accurate
View attachment 144338View attachment 144339View attachment 144340

Then we’re very familiar with Phyllis Nicklin’s 1960s view.

View attachment 144341

And finally a sketch produced in the 1950s - a travesty that the terrace was lost. Even then it was recognised as an important row of building. But alas, the Inner Ring Road won on that one. Viv.

View attachment 144342View attachment 144343
Viv re pic 4 one of those shops used to sell violins and cello's when I lived in William St . Which ever one it was there used to be a back from a cello or double bass attached to the door , whenever I walked around this area as a kid it just seemed so right that the posh people as I called them worked and lived here .
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
There's the back of a cello fixed to the wall (above the Thomas Smith premises) in the last two images in the post #48. Viv.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
thanks viv..i have always felt a great sense of loss at losing easy row and its wonderful georgian buildings and of course the woodman pub...what a great visitors attraction that area would have made now..very sad

lyn
 
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