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Digbeth

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
hi kieron on page 99 of this thread you have put charles froggatt down as landlord of the old guy in the 1860s but on your pubs page you have got george froggatt as being there..could you confirm which one it was please because as you know i need to check my froggatt line as i am convinced that a member of my froggatts who worked out of digbeth making leg irons ..handcuffs and dog collars also ran the old guy ..thanks keiron below is the info on your pubs page

lyn

. They were succeeded by George Froggatt who took over the pub that had reverted to the sign of the Old Guy. He may have been the same George Froggatt who, along with his wife Harriett, kept a beer house in Bishop Street in the early 1850s. If so, he came from a family of metal workers that plied their trade in Digbeth for many years. Several branches of the Froggatt family were involved in steel, brass and wire production in the locality.

George Froggatt had not long settled in before he found out that dealing with the local riff-raff was challenging. In August 1862 he was assaulted by two roughnecks who became violent after refusing to pay for beer served to them.
 
hi kieron on page 99 of this thread you have put charles froggatt down as landlord of the old guy in the 1860s but on your pubs page you have got george froggatt as being there..could you confirm which one it was please because as you know i need to check my froggatt line as i am convinced that a member of my froggatts who worked out of digbeth making leg irons ..handcuffs and dog collars also ran the old guy ..thanks keiron below is the info on your pubs page

lyn

. They were succeeded by George Froggatt who took over the pub that had reverted to the sign of the Old Guy. He may have been the same George Froggatt who, along with his wife Harriett, kept a beer house in Bishop Street in the early 1850s. If so, he came from a family of metal workers that plied their trade in Digbeth for many years. Several branches of the Froggatt family were involved in steel, brass and wire production in the locality.

George Froggatt had not long settled in before he found out that dealing with the local riff-raff was challenging. In August 1862 he was assaulted by two roughnecks who became violent after refusing to pay for beer served to them.

It was George at the pub - did I have a senior moment when typing Charles?
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
lol thanks kieron just one last question did you find this info or did you get it from me...if you found it then i am totally convinced that george froggatt is one of my froggatts...below is from your site

Several branches of the Froggatt family were involved in steel, brass and wire production in the locality.
 
lol thanks kieron just one last question did you find this info or did you get it from me...if you found it then i am totally convinced that george froggatt is one of my froggatts...below is from your site

Several branches of the Froggatt family were involved in steel, brass and wire production in the locality.

Lyn, when you say "did you get if from me," did you mean my senior moment?

George appears in a few docs, I have attached a newspaper article for you from Aris's Birmingham Gazette - Saturday 16th August 1862.
 

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Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
kieron i mentioned some time back that my froggatts started the froggatt empire making handcuffs...leg irons..dog collars etc just wondered if had remembered that so i need to make a deffo connection with those froggatts and the george froggatt who ran the old guy even though i am convinced they are one and the same family...just read that newspaper article you posted which says that the landlord of the minerva in bordesley st was in the old guy when the trouble started..i think its more than a coinsidence that bordesley street was also where my froggatts had their iron business at that time..as said i now need to find out where george fits into my family tree which i will start doing later today

lyn
 

devonjim

master brummie
I tried (and failed!) to transfer "Phils" picture of Joe Fox's sweet shop in the High St. This to me appears to be next to the old entrance to Bordesley Station ie up by the Doll's Club. I recall that in 1950's there was another sweet shop nearby, closer to the junction with Adderley Street that made sweets on the premises, such wonderful things as Troach Drops. Can anyone with a Kelly's confirm these thoughts?

 
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devonjim

master brummie
I'm learning! Phil's picture see post 114 above (maybe not!)
 

devonjim

master brummie
Screenshot (264).png

Sorry! I am sure that I should be able to transfer a posted picture from one thread to another but I have failed miserably. This is Phil's picture referred to in posts 114/5 above. Finally succeeded by using a screenshot.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
jim if you ever want to do that again just save the photo as you would any other photo then you can upload it from your files to the thread of your choice

lyn
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Don't know if you like modern street art around Digbeth.

But a few days ago got a chance to go around Ghetto Golf before it opened with a Facebook group I'm in called Brumtography.

So there was graffiti all over the place.



They did recreate The Old Crown there though.



I think it must have been an old warehouse on Gibb Street, near the Bordesley Viaduct and the Custard Factory.



Was a lot of horror movie and video game references here.



One hole on the first floor resembled an old room.

 
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