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Dartmouth Street 1881

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Note. My last post had a misstype. I have corrected this now but , in case anyone had already noted it down, the change in numbering took place between 1897 and 1899 (not 1887 & 1889)
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
EB699529-A0B1-43DA-88E0-39C3C44AFE44.jpeg

Bit more about Glass and Dartmouth Street.

In October 1838 Joseph Wallis and Joseph Richardson announced that they were now in Black glass Bottles at Victoria Bottle Works.

May 1839 there was a Prospectus to form a Joint Stock Company to carry on as the Victoria Bottle Works Co. "The Works consists of 3 furnaces, 8 annealing Arches, sundry valuable tools, moulds, fixtures and fittings"...."Birmingham, by its central situation and great access to water and other carriage, and from its present and rising importance, affords numerous advantages..."

Strangely there is an advert in July 1839...To be Let or Sold, premises called Victoria Bottle Works having a basin from the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham Canal.

In March 1848 Joseph and James Stevens, formerly of Coalbourne Hill Glass Works near Stourbridge, took over the works known as Victoria Bottle Works and owned by Messrs Wallis and Richardson. They were to manufacture flint and coloured glass. It seems to be referred to as the Victoria Glass Works, and James Stevens and Son existed until at least 1890.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
View attachment 127135

Bit more about Glass and Dartmouth Street.

In October 1838 Joseph Wallis and Joseph Richardson announced that they were now in Black glass Bottles at Victoria Bottle Works.

May 1839 there was a Prospectus to form a Joint Stock Company to carry on as the Victoria Bottle Works Co. "The Works consists of 3 furnaces, 8 annealing Arches, sundry valuable tools, moulds, fixtures and fittings"...."Birmingham, by its central situation and great access to water and other carriage, and from its present and rising importance, affords numerous advantages..."

Strangely there is an advert in July 1839...To be Let or Sold, premises called Victoria Bottle Works having a basin from the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham Canal.

In March 1848 Joseph and James Stevens, formerly of Coalbourne Hill Glass Works near Stourbridge, took over the works known as Victoria Bottle Works and owned by Messrs Wallis and Richardson. They were to manufacture flint and coloured glass. It seems to be referred to as the Victoria Glass Works, and James Stevens and Son existed until at least 1890.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
220px-Curzon_Street_Station_plaque_-Birmingham_-UK.JPG

I wonder if the reference to 'great access to water and other carriage' had the recently opened, September 1838, London to Birmingham Railway in mind? It doesn't say so, so maybe the prospectus quoted had gone to print before the official opening of the railway.
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Another pub that was on Dartmouth Street, but this one was not recorded in Kelly's as it was only a beer house. I had to ask Mike to find out where it was located for me, apparently it was down near the junction of Aston Road and before the renumbering of Dartmouth Street it was number 99 and after it was 255.

It looks like they are all off for a nice day out somewhere.

Aston Dartmouth St Queens Head Inn.jpg
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
lovely photo phil and good info...wonder where they were all off to....in those days i guess the licky hills would have been a good day out....we are getting a nice collection of photos now

lyn
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Lyn

I think the Lickeys would have possibly been a little far for a single horse drawn carriage, and don't forget the countryside was a lot closer then.
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
When I first saw this building in about 1953 all that was left was the outer walls after it had been bombed during WW2. It's the Holbrooks Sauce premises that stood on the corner of Dartmouth Street and Ashted Row. Holbrooks started out as a vinegar brewery but soon branched out into manufacturing sauces and a one time were the largest seller of Worcestershire sauce in the world and were sued by Lea & Perrins in 1906 to try to stop them calling their sauce Worcestershire Sauce, but Lea & Perrins lost the action.

37 Nechells Ashted Row - Dartmouth St Holbrooks.jpg
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Just across the canal basin from Holbrooks was the Union Glassworks. It looks like these glassworks had many owners in it's long life before closing it's doors in 1896. The two photos below date from 1892 and at that time the glassworks were owned by Stone Fawdry and Stone. The first Stone being Sir Benjamin Stone the noted Birmingham photographer, and these photos were most likely taken by him.

Nechells Dartmouth St Union Glassworks 1892.jpg

Nechells Dartmouth St Union Glass Works .jpg
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Just across the canal basin from Holbrooks was the Union Glassworks. It looks like these glassworks had many owners in it's long life before closing it's doors in 1896. The two photos below date from 1892 and at that time the glassworks were owned by Stone Fawdry and Stone. The first Stone being Sir Benjamin Stone the noted Birmingham photographer, and these photos were most likely taken by him.

View attachment 127155

View attachment 127156

Sir John Benjamin Stone was, amongst other things, a notable photographer, and his biography was written for the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography by Carl Chin..

https://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1....001.0001/odnb-9780198614128-e-38559?docPos=2

He seems to have been much better at photography than as an MP. The Birmingham Argus described him as "a docile voting machine.”

The link below is to a Forum thread and it describes Stone and the conditions those young lads had to work in.

https://birminghamhistory.co.uk/forum/index.php?threads/benjamin-stone.35043/#post-578857
 

tropdevin

New Member
View attachment 127135

Bit more about Glass and Dartmouth Street.

In October 1838 Joseph Wallis and Joseph Richardson announced that they were now in Black glass Bottles at Victoria Bottle Works.

May 1839 there was a Prospectus to form a Joint Stock Company to carry on as the Victoria Bottle Works Co. "The Works consists of 3 furnaces, 8 annealing Arches, sundry valuable tools, moulds, fixtures and fittings"...."Birmingham, by its central situation and great access to water and other carriage, and from its present and rising importance, affords numerous advantages..."

Strangely there is an advert in July 1839...To be Let or Sold, premises called Victoria Bottle Works having a basin from the Digbeth Branch of the Birmingham Canal.

In March 1848 Joseph and James Stevens, formerly of Coalbourne Hill Glass Works near Stourbridge, took over the works known as Victoria Bottle Works and owned by Messrs Wallis and Richardson. They were to manufacture flint and coloured glass. It seems to be referred to as the Victoria Glass Works, and James Stevens and Son existed until at least 1890.
Hi. Is the map you show available in the public domain, and do you know what date it was made? I am trying to research glass factories around the Dartmouth Street area in the 1840s - 1850s. Alan Thornton
 

Sarah M

proper brummie kid
Another pub that was on Dartmouth Street, but this one was not recorded in Kelly's as it was only a beer house. I had to ask Mike to find out where it was located for me, apparently it was down near the junction of Aston Road and before the renumbering of Dartmouth Street it was number 99 and after it was 255.

It looks like they are all off for a nice day out somewhere.

View attachment 127145
Hi Phil (and Mike) do you know which way the street numbers on the photograph run please? I'm interested because I've just discovered my great, great grandfather John William English on the electorial register at number 103 in 1896.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Sarah. 1896 was before the renumbering, so the numbers increased towards the left of the photo. om 103 would have been just outside the photo. Below is a map showing what was 103 in red.

map c1889 top dartmouth st showing no 103 in 1896.jpg
 
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