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Bull Ring until 1920s

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
I'm not sure that you actually see spiceal St there, but the short length of road leading to it. I think on this 1750 map the viewpoint is approximately where the blue arrow is, and the bit you can see in the centre is in purple. It doesn't seem to have a name that i can find

 

cuppateabiscuit

master brummie
Hi, I'm not sure how acurate the drawing will be, it is by Samuel Lines Senior, who would have remembered the original area (born 1778), but there is no date on the original so it could be from memory or earlier sketches. I will try and find out some more info on when the drawing was made. There were no names, that I know of, of the routes between the buildings, as it was a really makeshift area. It's great to see the drawing in context with the map.
 

Rupert

master brummie
The well pump in the picture post #444 is also shown in picture #452/2, outside the church gate...still remaining after the buildings were demolished.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
The pump was nicknamed "Pratchetts Pump". This is an extract from Harry Howells Horton's "Birmingham: a poem" 1853

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1355697385.964761.jpg

Viv
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
The area was certainly changing from 20 years earlier.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1355748437.843994.jpg

When the old houses were removed the church gates were permanently locked, cutting off a public walkway through the churchyard. The churchyard had become so full of bodies that the ground around it became coniderably more raised - an original, lower boundary wall had been unconvered. From "The portrait of Birmingham" 1825, here's a nice description of the activities in the triangular area which was cleared once the old houses were removed. Love the mention of the Beadle and his scales! Viv.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1355748796.077738.jpg
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Dennis
The second photograph must have been taken between 1900 & 1903. The Midland parcels office was not listed there in the 1900 Kellys (though it could have been there at some time in that year), Edwin Eades and the Midland office were listed here in the 1903, Kellys, but Eades had changed to Clement & Toon, hardware dealers in the 1904 Kellys
 

Dennis Williams

Proud Brummie
Dennis
The second photograph must have been taken between 1900 & 1903. The Midland parcels office was not listed there in the 1900 Kellys (though it could have been there at some time in that year), Edwin Eades and the Midland office were listed here in the 1903, Kellys, but Eades had changed to Clement & Toon, hardware dealers in the 1904 Kellys
Thanks mike, and now can you confirm this caption ?clanger? Was there ever such a place as Moat ROAD? Fascinating shot though...loved the sign for a Whip maker...and what was that hole in the wall for? Altogether the buildings look a bit 'run down'...

Moat Road 1880s tram.jpg
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
As you no doubt know Dennis, this was Moat row. there probably was/ps a moat road somewhere, but not in birmingham
 

Rupert

master brummie
The previous photo shows a state of decrepitude of the buildings even then. I suppose they were a hundred years old likely still even we would remember a similar state up to the 1960s in some areas. One wonders what the infrastructure would have been like when new. Good new addition.
 

sistersue61

master brummie
I wonder if any of moms rels worked at the whip makers, her moms family were renon whipmakers to the gentry and were Birmingham based from the 1890's, though I am not sure exactly where.
Sue
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
I love this painting of the Bull Ring. Old Market Hall to the right, St. Martin's straight head. I can almost smell the chestnuts roasting somewhere down there! To me this picture has great atmosphere. Don't know the date or artist, looks about 1920s maybe? Or possibly even later. Viv.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1361659321.727169.jpg
 

paul stacey

master brummie
What a wonderful, atmospheric painting Viv, makes you really want to be there does't it, makes my great old city seem so alive.
paul
 
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