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Bread Vehicles

Johnfromstaffs

Johnfromstaffs
April 1953 Morris-Commercial. LC3 I think, (later info says it's an LC5 model) but the designation depends on the size of the load it was built for. Single back wheels suggest 30cwt at most is about right. This design originated pre WW2, and was updated a bit as the years wore on, I have driven a 1959 builder's truck based on this chassis but slightly heavier, with twin rear wheels, it was no fun with a load of wet sand in it.

TOC, on the Standard 8 or 10 behind it is March 1956, so Willson's, or the driver, looked after the van, which would be at least 3 years old..
 
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Peter44

New Member
Most certainly the bread delivered by our co-op rounds man was wrapped in a greaseproof paper. Ironically it was called Golden Crust, but in reality, the crust was soft and stodgy. Mum would use the wrapper to wrap our sandwiched for work.

Pen: the man in the brown cow gown and who a very large basket over his arm was called Les. He worked the round with a younger chap with curly hair.

I do recall Les saying he had worked at the co-op bakery for over 30 years.
Hi
I worked as a lad in 1962/5 at the coop in Stetchford If I recall the sliced loaves thick or thin were one and penny a loaf ,the tin loaves were a shilling,batches about 6d in the baskets we also had various biscuits which included Tunnocks Caramel bars still on sale today ( lovely) I worked with a great chap called Wally Smith we served all around the Perry common area and clearly recall he used to serenade the housewives when they came to the door for the bread ( what a different world then)
Peter
 
Hi
I worked as a lad in 1962/5 at the coop in Stetchford If I recall the sliced loaves thick or thin were one and penny a loaf ,the tin loaves were a shilling,batches about 6d in the baskets we also had various biscuits which included Tunnock's Caramel Bars still on sale today ( lovely) I worked with a great chap called Wally Smith we served all around the Perry common area and clearly recall he used to serenade the housewives when they came to the door for the bread ( what a different world then)
Peter
I like the occasional Tunnock's Caramel Bar. It is claimed that they flog 5 million per week! And 3 million of their tea cakes are apparently sold each week, though it was only 2,999,999 on this week ....

squirrel[1].jpg
 

Shardendken

Lapsed Brummie
I can remember the CO-OP bread van in the late 50's delivering bread to most of the Shard End estate. We had our regular roundsman named Harry; at about the age of 9 I had a Saturday morning job with him delivering the bread. He was always cheerful and totally reliable and his electric 'float' was similar to that of KVP 144 earlier in this thread. The fully charged CO-OP floats would come from the bakery, in Garretts Green, and return at a much slower pace - but would always get back to the depot.
 

mw0njm.

Brummie Dude
I had a friend who worked at the stechford bakery. he drove a electric bread van. one day i met him on the cov rd going back to to depot. the van was creeping along. so I said whats up. he said the battery is flat. no probs i said i will give you a tow. i put the rope on and away we went. i was driving a sherpa van.we was going ok so i went a bit faster. about 20 mph.then there was an almighty bang from behind and i felt the rope pull. i got out and had a look.there were bits of electric motor and such all over the rd. so i said call the depot. but don't say anything about being towed.and i scarpered leaving my mate to face the music....... .... sorry.joe
 

lmr3103

master brummie
I can remember the CO-OP bread van in the late 50's delivering bread to most of the Shard End estate. We had our regular roundsman named Harry; at about the age of 9 I had a Saturday morning job with him delivering the bread. He was always cheerful and totally reliable and his electric 'float' was similar to that of KVP 144 earlier in this thread. The fully charged CO-OP floats would come from the bakery, in Garretts Green, and return at a much slower pace - but would always get back to the depot.
Where have all those lovely cheerful types gone? :(
 
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