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Back In Time For Tea, Bbc2

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
A six part series, starting February the 6th on BBC2, where a Bradford family go back in time to discover how changing food in the North of England can reveal how life was like over the last century. They start in 1918.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Watched the recorded episode today, Was interesting, though I have my doubts as to whether the family really had more than one meal in each yearly period covered, and so did not really experiencxe what they would have in those days.
 

pjmburns

master brummie
I wondered that but it was still interesting to see what food was (or wasn't available). I wanted to know more about what the two girls did but I suppose that wasn't about "tea". Didn't think it was as good as the last back in time series.
 

Lady Penelope

master brummie
I didn't think it was as good as the last series either Janice.
The one good thing about the programme was that I was able to have an in-depth conversation about tripe with an older gentleman, Eric, the next day over a cup of coffee. He liked it and I know Dad did too, cooked in milk with onions. He also said that 'polony' was still available and it made me realise where Eric came from so something else to chat about.
 

Maria Magenta

master brummie
The bit where the mother said that the stuff cooked in a jar was like dog food was quite funny!
I'm sure I've seen the bacon roll recipe somewhere.
Do you think they actually spend nights in the house (we haven't seen upstairs), and can't have baths and what have you?
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
I doubt if they did spend the night there. I remember with distaste bacon rolypoly. Hated it, but my grandmother mad eit a lot
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
My mum being a Yorkshire lass and a miner's daughter loved all the offal/insides of meat, so I've had a few brushes with some of the less appetising parts of animals. When she moved to Birmingham in the 1940s , I think she gave up on a lot of that stuff as she now considered herself as living 'down south'. In fact when I used to go and stay in Yorkshire during school holidays I was regarded as a "reet posh southerner" ! But I won them over with my penchant for flat cakes and oven bottom cakes (for those who don't know, these are breads not sweet cakes).

But I remember Mum still had the occasional tripe and onions (not for me thanks) and something called chitterlings. Never was sure what they were. Looked disgusting, so was never tempted.

I remember having a particular liking for soft roes, doubtless another thing which my mum particularly liked. Haven't seen those on sale for years.

Viv.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Chitterlings are boiled pig's intestines . The smell alone is enough to make me want to puke. Even worse than thinking about eating tripe (not that I ever have eaten any)
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
Chitterlings are boiled pig's intestines . The smell alone is enough to make me want to puke. Even worse than thinking about eating tripe (not that I ever have eaten any)

use to love chitterlings mike....to avoid any cooking smells our mom used to buy them ready cooked from a shop on the lozells road.

lyn
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
It was probably a place like that that put me off them; when I smelled the air from up to 150 yards around it
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Looks like there could be more tripe on the menu for the 1940s family. Bet they can't wait. Viv.

image.jpeg
 

jukebox

Engineer Brummie
I'm surprised they had only a cold tap for so long. I remember many houses had those Ascot gas propelled water heaters.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
same here mike our house in villa st was only cold running water until the mid 60s..then came the ascot..

lyn
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Our 1930s house had hot water heated by the coal fire. Not sure what we did in summer ir how we got hot water. But we certainly didn't have baths as frequently as today. I remember later we had an emersion heater installed. Viv.
 
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