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Ashted Brewery, Heneage Street and Sea Horse Inn, Buck Street

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Hi Colin

The sea horse can be seen here about half way down the right hand side of Buck Street. Though it started out life as a home brew pub selling an ale known as Digbeth Water it later became a non alcoholic coffee tavern and was closed and demolished when the area was cleared for redevelopment in the 50's I believe.
 

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Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Hello Again Colin

It says here that The Ashted Brewery was on Ashted Row and it was owned by George Wilkinson & Co it further states that they ceased brewing in 1890 so it is doubtful that a photo will be found, but never say never.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id...v=onepage&q=Ashted brewery Birmingham&f=false

As for the Heneage Street connection I did find a Ashted Brewery owned by Marrion & Cracklow at 244 Heneage St in Slaters 1846 Directory. 244 Heneage Street is listed later as Heneage Metals.
 
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mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
The Ashted Brewery existed in Heneage St from at least May 1829, as a property advert listed it as being close to the brewery there. As Phil says it was originally owned by Marrion & Cracklow. John Marron died in 1840, but presumably another family member took it on, but It was advertised for sale "after the death of Mr Marrion". Advertismants for the formation of a limited Ashted Brewery Co were placed in June 1861 but it was advertised for sale "on behalf of creditors" in December 1861. The sale was cancelled, but in 1863 the brewery was advertised for sale by the executors of Mr Marrion (no mention of creditors), and the site apparently used for other purposes , the purchasers not wanting the plant, which was sold separately. In 1844 we start hearing of the Ashted Brewery in Ashtead Row. don't think you bought the name of a company in those days. Maybe they bought the brewing plant and recipes.in the plant sale.

Birm_post_21_5_1863.jpg
birm_J__1_4_1863.jpg
aris_birm_gaz_15_6_1861.jpg
aris_birm_gaz__28_12_1861.jpg
aris_b__Gaz_28_8_1854.jpg
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Hi Colin

The sea horse can be seen here about half way down the right hand side of Buck Street. Though it started out life as a home brew pub selling an ale known as Digbeth Water it later became a non alcoholic coffee tavern and was closed and demolished when the area was cleared for redevelopment in the 50's I believe.


The Sea Horse in Buck Street and “Digbeth Water” are mentioned in the book The Old Taverns of Birmingham by E Edwards written in 1879.

“Those, however, who knew it in its original and unadorned and honest brickwork (the Sea Hors) would scarcely recognise it now in its new and tawdry finery.

It is 30 to 40 years since I was taken by a friend to see this house, which was then one of the sights of Birmingham. There was another object in view. I was to taste for the first time marvellous home-brewed of the house, which, I was told, was known to everyman in Birmingham, and was lovingly remembered by every absent Birmingham man, the wide world over, by the name of "Digbeth Water.”

(He gives an extensive description of the interior and the cliental and says the history is nothing particular before 1796!)
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi pedrocut
How are you my friend i have just read your thread and request about the pub
Named the sea Horse and the beer named famously brew was known as digbeth water
Well i have a book in front of me right now
With a picture in black and white
And he is the story
Buck street,Digbeth 1945 what appears to be an unremarkable corner pub, namel
The Sea Horse, is in fact a Coffee Taveren, These Non alcholic alternatives to more traditional Taverns
Were a Legacy of flourishing Temperance movement of the Late Nineteeth Century
But by the time of the second world war, they had but all disapeared.
A Similar fate was about to befall the Sea Horse with the Razing of the area.
Ironically, this was a fomer home,brew pub, its
Beer once famously known as Digbeth Water,,.
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi pedrocut
Have you read my reslose to the sea horse last thread i have give last night
Astonian,
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
how i missed this thread i will never know:eek: my4x and 5x gt grandfathers were living in heneage st from at least1841 to 71 so must have seen ashted brewery..wouldnt think they worked there though as they were brushmakers and glassblowers

lyn
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Mike

I believe the pub owned by Ashted Brewery in the Dudley Street photo was the Apple Tree.
 

colin smith

proper brummie kid
Thanks for your comments and information about the Ashted Brewery and also "the Sea Horse" inn located in Buck Street.
John Marrian was my Grandmother's Grandfather. His son William was my Great Grandfather. We have photos of William
and many artefacts associated with the brewery and the pub including photos of the Sea Horse when it was a Temperance Coffee Bar over seen by the Methodist Church in Birmingham. The one item we do not have is a picture of the brewery nor exactly where
it was situated in Heneage Street.My late father had an idea it may have been on the former site of Newton Oils near to Woodcock
Street.That may not be the case as property numbers generally run away from the city and Newton oils was located at the city end of Heneage Street. Most the original Heneage Street was destroyed when the slums were cleared in the 1950's
Here is a taster . An original poster catalogue and the night watchman's truncheon with the words 'Do your duty-Ashted Brewery'
It is hard to read all the words on this photo but it mentions two waggon horses 'Nobby' and 'Boxer' and even refrigeration equipment !!-Remember this was 1862 !
Colin Smith
More to come when I have time to sort out various items we have in our possession associated with these two buildings
image.jpeg
 
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mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Colin
The Ashtead brewery changed its name in 1884 to the Birmingham Town Brewery and was at 185-188 Ashtead Row (info from Birmingham Breweries by Joseph McKenna). It can be seen below in this c1889 map (brewing finished 1890 so just got in) on the corner of Windsor St.

map showing birmingham town brewery ex Ashtead brewery.jpg
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Mike

I find that odd because this photo of that corner of Windsor Street is shown on the map as open yard, but this photo of that corner in the 60's shortly before it was demolished shows that there were buildings. The only thing I can suggest is that these premises were built shortly after that map was produced. I know that the photo is correct because I remember the catering hire shop that was there at that time. So perhaps this is when the Brewery moved to Heneage Street?

Sorry I should have added or from here to Heneage Street to here?

Nechells Ashted Row - Windsor St 1961 (2).jpg
 
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mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Phil
As I said the brewery ceased brewing in 1890. the c1921 map shows a row of buildings has been built on Ashtead row along what was the edge of the yard . The building you showed the photo of must be the end one of this row.

map c1921 corner ashtead row and windsor st.jpg
 

colin smith

proper brummie kid
I believe the original Ashted Brewery closed and was sold [see poster Jan 2nd/3rd 1862] as a result of the affairs of
John Marrian being wound up after his decease. I am not sure what happened to Mr Cracklow his partner. It is apparent that the
business was sold and bought by someone else and run from an address in Ashted Row.
William Marrian his son may not have wanted to take the business on for reasons I will allude to on another occasion.

I have a 'Marrian' family tree which I will have to check some dates on . It gives the link to the Marrian connection with the
the Sea Horse Inn as well.
It is a well documented and goes back to around 1450 when a certain Marrian Depres came to England just before the the
Hugenots
Colin Smith
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
As I said at the beginning of this thread, Slaters Directory puts Ashted Brewery at 244 Heneage Street in 1846. So unless there was a renumbering at sometime this site at the corner of Adams Street and Heneage Street was later taken over by Heneage Metals. I've attached a photo of that building from the 60's and another one of it now as miraculously (for Nechells) it has survived. I post these to give an idea of the location.

Nechells Adam Street Birmingham 1960s Heneage Metals.jpg 244 heneage street.JPG
 

colin smith

proper brummie kid
That is interesting. By coincidence I drove down Adam Street yesterday ,so I now know where the original site was.
Colin
 

colin smith

proper brummie kid
I have done a little more research [see three attachments]
What I have gleaned is that Francis Marrian was married to Ann and they had a son called William.
Francis successfully ran the 'Sea Horse Inn' and then his son took over from him and ran it for a number of years.
He had a brother called John who ran the Ashted Brewery. He married Maria Bromwich a widow of 25 when he was 53
and they had a son called Francis William Marrian [my Great Grandfather]. John died June 3rd 1840 at the age of 75 and
Maria died at the age of 45 in 1838.
The Poster/catalogue indicates that the brewery was up for sale in January 1862 ?
Also when John was married to Maria in 1818 it is said he was of the Birmingham Brewery.
The later brewery in Ashted Row is marked on the map as Birmingham Town Brewery ?
Any answers please
Colin
PS
While I was typing this something came to mind. I seem to remember receiving a letter some one years ago about the
Sea Horse inn.I had sent a letter to the Birmingham Mail asking for help with my research.The sender of the letter told
me about a late female relative of there's who had worked there and been treated as a virtual slave for many years.
I will try and find it.
 

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