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Army rank query

craiguito

master brummie
My great grandfather Albert Allcott is listed in 1918 on the electoral register as an absent voter with the following army rank:
P/14479, A/L.-Cpl., M.F.P.
Could somebody decipher it for me please?
Also, in 1918, he would have been 40. Would that not have been too old to serve? I've defintiely got the right person because of the address.

Thanks
Craig
 

Chris_Baker

master brummie
Quite right, MFP = Military Foot Police
The P prefix also indicates this
40 certainly not too old - in 1918 the higher age limit was raised to 50!
 

craiguito

master brummie
Thanks for all the feedback so far. I only found out today that he served in the Great War. Can anyone let me know how I go about finding out where he served?

Thanks

Craig
 

smtr

master brummie
His medal card is on Ancestry.
R War R Pte 3179
M F P P14479
Medals - British, Victory and 1914 Star
Date of entry 11.11.14

He had been mistranscribed as A Alcutt

regards

Suzanne
 
W

Wendy

Guest
In the Birmingham National Roll of The Great War there is an Allcott, A L/Cpl, 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment. I am not sure if this is your man the address is Devonshire Street.
 
W

Wendy

Guest
Allcott, A, L/Cpl, 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
He volunteered in September 1914 and was shortly afterwords drafted to France, where he took part in many important engagements, including those of Arras, Ypres and Armentieres. Later he was transferred to Italy and was in action on the Piave. He returned home and wes demobilised in February 1919, holding the 1914 star and the General Service and Victory Medals.
75 Devonshire Street, Hockley, Birmingham.

I have typed it as it is in the book.:):)
 

Chris_Baker

master brummie
His medal index card is not necessarily (and indeed probably not) a mistranscription, but how he gave his name when he attested. It is given as Alcut. To be sure, you would need to check the original entry in the medal rolls.

To find out how to do that and see a step by step guide to researching a soldier, go to https://www.1914-1918.net/ and click on "Research a soldier".
 
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