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ANN STREET CITY CENTRE

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thanks Leslam! Didn't think of that. Viv

Phil. Nice to see the 1855 drawing of the early buildings when they were thriving businesses. Thanks. Viv.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Just read the earlier "ann street" thread. Highly recommended to anyone who hasn't seen it. A fascinating and very informative insight into the earlier history of this area of Birmingham. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Thanks for the pointer Leslam. Viv.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
it does chris but minus all the images that have been posted...in the new year i will try and find some of the ones i posted and re post them...

lyn
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
Ann_Street_1867.jpgactually i will start now as ive just found 2 pics...ann st later to become colmore row..

pic 1 dated 1867
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Another Ann Street (Court #6) photo. Looks to be in the process of demolition. Maybe to make way for the Council House perhaps? Viv.

ImageUploadedByTapatalkHD1419372023.249255.jpg
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
No, but I have found the male equivalent in this very interesting gem from Victor Skipp's book "The Making of Victorian Birmingham", which also links to your equally brilliant thread on Suffolk St, if a tad obtusely. Seems like that Ann St girl's school was quite novel too, in as much as it was the forerunner of Adult Education as we know it, as championed by Joseph Sturge in the mid 1800s. The male equivalent was in Severn Street, off Suffolk St. I personally profited later when I attended the Suffolk St Matthew Boulton Technical College for a term before transferring to the new premises (now also demolished) in Bristol Rd in the early 60s. Read on...

Ann Street School - interior view. Image from the Connecting Histories site. Viv.

ImageUploadedByTapatalkHD1419372184.355983.jpg
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Ann Street must still be visible in this section of Samuel Lines's painting showing the view from the dome of St. Phillips's church. Not sure exactly where the street begins and ends but assume its to the right of Christ Church (centre of the view). Viv.

ImageUploadedByTapatalkHD1419373128.531858.jpg
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
Allins shop advert..jpg
I am told that Allins was a cheap shop for mainly women's clothes and was situated near the top of new Street.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Stitcher Allins shop in your image was at the junction of Ann Street (disappeared when Colmore Row was extended) and Congreve Street. Allin also set up another shop in High Street. A nice clear image, thanks for posting.

Alan, I'd be interested to know what 'York shoes' were too. One thing we can probably assume is that they were relatively cheap. Maybe the man in front of the shop is wearing them. Viv.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
for anyone who is not sure where ann st finished it was at bennetts hill..below 1839 map

ann st 1839.jpg
 
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Lady Penelope

master brummie
Post #123 - just looked up 'multum in parvo'. It means 'much in a little'. Do you think it's 'Allins' or 'All - ins'?
Stitcher, is your post #126 the shop in Digbeth?
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Re Astonesses post #127, this 1880 drawing from Dents "Old and New Birmingham" shows clearly how far Ann Street reached. Christ Church is central, New Steeet is to the right and Ann Street is to the left. Ann Street came down as far as Allin's shop on the left, just behind the group of three pedestrians. Viv.

image.jpeg
 
S

Stitcher

Guest
Post #123 - just looked up 'multum in parvo'. It means 'much in a little'. Do you think it's 'Allins' or 'All - ins'?
Stitcher, is your post #126 the shop in Digbeth?

Hello Lady Penelope, as far as I am aware it is Allins.
 
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