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A House Through Time

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
hope you enjoy mort this first episode has only covered the tenants who were living there for the first 15 years so lots more to come...must have taken a lot of research

lyn
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Fascinating programme and another example of how much can be found from the modern sources available.

A great comparison between James Orr, who rose in a way that would be admired by Victorians, and Wilfred Steele who would go the other way.

It is easy to see why David Olusoga has little sympathy with Wilfred, but could a little more be found about James Orr? James obviously pursued a course towards gentrification, and in doing so would have to be seen to show his concern for the less fortunate, and did so by collecting for local charities. But he left £16K, equivalent to £1.5m.....we were told of the 18 properties in Birkenhead. What were his other business interests, was he an absent landlord?
 

devonjim

master brummie
I, too enjoyed this programme and looking forward to the next one in the series. I thought that there are probably forum members who would be quite capable of doing this detail of research. What web sites/apps would be needed? Does the forum ever run formal group projects?
 

Morturn

Super Moderator
Staff member
I have not seen one here, however, looking and reading some of the work done on here (the Perry Barr cottage) it would certainly be something well researched. Sometimes it just good leg work, sharing information and discussion.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Agree Mort.

Great first episode - and only 15 years into the history of the house. It's especially of interest as I've ancestors from Liverpool who were merchants. Some great background info. Can't wait for the next episode. Viv.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Apparently there are four episodes, but the Radio Times (online) describes it as "series one"
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
I, too enjoyed this programme and looking forward to the next one in the series. I thought that there are probably forum members who would be quite capable of doing this detail of research. What web sites/apps would be needed? Does the forum ever run formal group projects?
It is possible to find a great amount these days with access to the internet, but of course it comes at a cost. The “Ancestry” site gives access to census records that were used in the programme, and much more, such as various commercial directories etc.

The British Newspaper Archive has now more than 23m pages online, but again at a cost. Many are not online and, as Morturn says, legwork would be needed to consult local archives as in the programme.

There are many old books available free via Google Books and Gutenberg, and also access via an App to British Library 19C books. For the specialist subject background you can access around half a million theses online by just registering with a site.
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Liverpool was also featured in the series “Who do you think you are” and Ricky Tomlinson. As in this programme the “Industrial School” got a mention when he learned of his ancestors...

“The Royle Family actor blasted inequality and the class divide in 1900's Liverpool which saw his great, great grandfather William Tomlinson and his wife Mary, along with their six kids, squashed into a house of eleven - with just one bathroom between them....records then showed two of her children were classed as "deserted by mother" which he then learned meant she was forced to send them to an industrial school as she was too poor to look after them....Land of Hope and Glory - my arse!.”
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
I do not know about the program discussed here, and the presenter is himself a historian , so will have had a lot more input, but WDYTYA certainly often relies on people like us. As I have noted before, i was approached via an IM on the forum for detials of Birmingham for their Martin Shaw program, and provided a lot of information re neihghbourhoods, and life of his ancestors, only a small proportion of it being used. One of our other members visited a local cemetery to look for a gravestone of one of his ancestors, though , unfortunately there was no stone.
Should add that at no time was I told of who the final subject would be, though the names of his ancestors made it obvious
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
A well researched and expensive programme. Remaining episodes should be good based on the first. Presenter spent some time in America trying to trace details of a tenant who later fought in the American Civil War. Am going to have to catch up on next two episodes on iPlayer as I shall not be able to watch them as they go out.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
hope you enjoy the rest of the series david....be nice if a future series could follow he occupants of a house in birmingham:)

lyn
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
The house chosen was in the posh part of Liverpool and this would aid research. It is difficult to find info in the newspapers of the ordinary working class, unless they appear in, say, the Petty Sessions or are artisans.
 

superdad3

master brummie
Fascinating programme especially for an ex-scouser. I went to school for five years a few blocks away from Falkner St. Spent many a lunch time wandering around the area (unofficially - needed to climb the school railings to get out). This area is now called the Georgian Quarter - Liverpool has more Georgian buildings than Bath!

Will be interested to see what happened to the house in later years as this area was going downhill for many years before Liverpool reinvented itself as a top tourist attaction.
 

devonjim

master brummie
Went up to Bristol a couple of weeks ago and looked over SS Great Britain, which operated out of Liverpool to N America from 1845. The cabins were so small!
 
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