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WW1 relatives in uniform

pjmburns

master brummie
Not sure if this should be in an existing thread but with 11 Nov approaching I thought I would share some photos sent home by my Grandfather - born in 1897 he enlisted 22 Nov 1915, injured 29 Sept 1917 and demobbed 12 March 1918. He was in the Royal engineers (a sapper). His name was Charles Campbell. No service records that I have found.
He is in the middle in baggy cardigan.
 

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pjmburns

master brummie
When Charlie returned to England after being injured he was sent to Napsbury hospital in Hertfordshire. In this photo he is at the back by the window.
 

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Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
just to confirm jan is that charlie standing up and which one is he in the first photo..smashing photos thanks for sharing them you are lucky to have them..

lyn
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
my grandad albert ernest wood on the left standing up..royal field artillary..survived the war but came back in poor health due to the effects of being gassed a couple of times...died in 1938 aged 50..i am lucky enough to have his service recordsalbert wood RFA.jpg
 
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pjmburns

master brummie
just to confirm jan is that charlie standing up and which one is he in the first photo..smashing photos thanks for sharing them you are lucky to have them..

lyn
Yes standing up in hospital photo. In the other photo, sorry should have said - he is middle row and right in the centre - looks as if he has a baggy cardigan on. (I will amend post).
 

pjmburns

master brummie
Super photos Janice, do you know where the first one was taken?
I have no idea - I know he was sent to Ireland for training after he enlisted but that is all. I will find the photo and see if the back offers any clues.
 

pjmburns

master brummie
Another one of Grandad Campbell - looking a bit smarter this time. Ever present cigarette (when I knew him it was Players untipped - and his fingers were brown). He is second from the left standing up.
 

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pjmburns

master brummie
Grandad's older brother Harry (actually John Henry) was a career soldier in RHA and based in India for a some of his service. Family story is that he saw less WW1 action than Charlie as they left some of the forces in situ and sent the untrained ones to the front. I am not sure that was true as he was involved in the Mesopotamia campaign 1917 - 1919 before being sent back to India.
He sent this photo home to his sisters (this was 1908 but I love the uniforms and he did serve in WW1) . I am posting it as he says "photo of some of the Brum chaps that sleep in our room" - he also promises to send some money next week. Harry is front right sitting down.
 

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MWS

master brummie
Great photos! Not sure when my granddad enlisted but he was in the labour corps, he was 37 when the war began. This is the only photo I've got, he is the one beneath the cross.

scan0018.jpg

I wonder if a descendant of one of the other men has a better copy somewhere.
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Harry Myers, my father (b. 1899, Summer Lane, d. 1974 Streetly), tried for R.N.A.S but rejected for eyesight reasons, finally accepted for the Army at the Recruiting Office in Suffolk Street on or around his 18th birthday in November 1917, joined initially the London Scottish, later posted to 2/1st Lovatt Scouts and ended up in 3rd Cameron Highlanders.

He was in France or Flanders in the summer of 1918 and was wounded in July or August , repatriated and treated in a military hospital in Colchester. September saw him up and about and photographed at Stoneleigh together with his father and the Knowle and Dorridge Volunteers (the Great War Home Guard). As a serving soldier, he is the only one without a rifle; and about the only one without a fearsome moustache (back row, extreme right).

Happy times after the Armistice at the regimental barracks in Edinburgh in early 1919 - the sentry go image probably dates from then, (the one in full dress uniform from then or earlier, before he went to France) and also the one (of many I have) showing young lads happy to have survived and looking forward to whatever life has to offer.

Chris
 

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LOZELLIAN

master brummie
To all members far & wide,

I'd just like to express my immense gratitude and utmost respect to all our brave servicemen and women on this forthcoming remembrance day especially bearing in mind that it's the centenary of the end of WW1. On a personal note I'm very thankful that my only Grandad was one of the lucky ones who came home, not all were so fortunate. I had a good 17 years getting to know him but, WW1 was something he never spoke about. God bless em all, lest we forget.

Lozellian.
 

ChrisM

Super Moderator
Staff member
Cpl. Edwin Sheldon (1897-1986, Walsall) was my father-in-law. He was in the 14th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). The Battalion was fighting in the Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) near a place called Gheluvelt. On Monday 21st October 1917 Edwin and his officer, 2/Lt. Douglas Pettigrew who was at his side at that moment, were both injured and half buried by an exploding shell. Edwin was repatriated home together with a piece of shrapnel which was extracted from his body. Douglas Pettigrew, whom Edwin greatly admired, was not so fortunate and died of his wounds the following day.

The images show Edwin convalescing at home with his proud father; and the piece of German iron which very probably saved his life.

Chris

Edwin2.jpgw500.jpg
 

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castalla

master brummie
My Granddad (standing no idea who man sat is ) Denis W Breakwell, formally Adrian Cottages Kings Heath, York Road, then married Gladys Finch (Highbury road )Penden Road Yardley Wood. Served West Riding Regiment and Cycle Regiment. Before war believe worked as a tailor or in a tailors shop, Mosley road swimming baths, Cadburys
 

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Lady Penelope

master brummie
What a smashing thread Janice. Brilliant idea!

My uncle, Samuel Woolley, fought in WW1 and it affected him badly. I'm not sure off-hand which regiment he was in to start with but he was transferred to another where he wore a kilt and apparently when the material got wet and froze it cut their legs to ribbons.

First picture is Samuel by what looks like a train. He's in the back row on the right. Second picture is after he was transferred. Third is William, on the right, Sam's younger brother who ran away and joined the army. He was too young so they brought him back! He waited for his birthday and joined the navy and was a radio operator. Last picture is them both together, at the beginning of the war I imagine.
 

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pjmburns

master brummie
I have no idea where this was taken or when but the soldier circled was my paternal Gran's brother Thomas Burridge - he survived the war, came home married and had two daughters. He lived in Wolverhampton and worked for the Wolverhampton Express and Star (I think he worked in the print room). I have no idea what unit he served in.
I remember him well as he did not die until 1969 and for some reason was the one of my Gran's siblings we visited the most.

Just found him on 1918 eroll in Cooksey Road with his eldest brother and his family.
1541849628085.png
 

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jukebox

Engineer Brummie
Lyn - how fantastic that you have his service records.
I obtained my Granddad's WW1 service records (all 31 pages!) from the National Archives. Many records were I believe were destroyed during WW2 but I was lucky. Start with http://discovery.nationalarchives.g...rvice records&_sd=1914&_ed=1920&_hb=tna&_d=WO and try different filters. If you then find the person you're looking for click the entry and you will then be able to pay a fee (£8.50) for them to see if the records are available. If they are you can arrange to view them at the National Archives in Kew or have them digitised and made available to download.
 
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