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Wrensons

mw0njm.

brummie dude
hi. was there a wrensons on aston rd,corner of phillips st. i used to go in there for mom.it smelled like bacon all the time
 

Linda Jennings

master brummie
hi. was there a wrensons on aston rd,corner of phillips st. i used to go in there for mom.it smelled like bacon all the time
Hi
I loved the aroma that permeated the air in Wrensons. Masons had the same aroma too. I used go with my Nan to the shop on Kings Road / Finchley Road Kingstanding. Sugar would be weighed and put into a dark blue paper bag.
Such happy memories of being with my Nan, she was so lovely!
Regards
Linda
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
same here linda...i well remember the smells from the cooked meat shops along the lozells road...i was fascinated by the bacon and meat slicer..always expected the assistant to chop off a finger lol...happy days indeed..it was a different world back then

lyn
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Lyn, not only was there a danger with the meat slicer the bacon sides had to be boned using very sharp knives!!! I spent a couple of months with Wrenson, a fill in job until the one I was interested arose. At the tender age of sixteen I was not allowed to be involved in the bacon preparation process, but someone who worked there did manage to cut himself - not sure how badly, but it did mean a hospital trip. Interestingly the next time I met him, two or three months later, he was conductor on the BCT so he did not stay with Wrenson very long either. It was an enjoyable place to work but sadly for Wrenson my mind was focused on science.
Those were the days, in the early 1950's when those who found there was more week than money and could ask for smaller quantities of things as most things were measured by weight then. It was also useful for those living alone who did not want large quantities particularly as most folk, at that time, did not have refrigerators - let alone even heard of a freezer.
Wrappings, what little there was, were mostly recycled, one way or another. Cartons could light fires, sugar bags were used at schools making small objects, paper bags were re-used to hold things that were needed in future but had to be kept in something that could be written upon, thus announcing the contents. There was not the waste of this century and the last trimestre of the 20th.
 
Last edited:

Williamstreeter

master brummie
Hi
I loved the aroma that permeated the air in Wrensons. Masons had the same aroma too. I used go with my Nan to the shop on Kings Road / Finchley Road Kingstanding. Sugar would be weighed and put into a dark blue paper bag.
Such happy memories of being with my Nan, she was so lovely!
Regards
Linda
Mr Tomelty was the manager of our local branch of Wrensons on Broad St , those lovely smells of coffee , cold meats , the zipwire for the change . Mr Tomelty's day to day wear was a grey cow gown with a black and white vertical striped apron , those indeed were the days when the boss got hands on as well as his staff . Plus the fact he was a devout Roman Catholic
 

Linda Jennings

master brummie
Lyn, not only was there a danger with the meat slicer the bacon sides had to be boned using very sharp knives!!! I spent a couple of months with Wrenson, a fill in job until the one I was interested arose. At the tender age of sixteen I was not allowed to be involved in the bacon preparation process, but someone who worked there did manage to cut himself - not sure how badly, but it did mean a hospital trip. Interestingly the next time I met him, two or three months later, he was conductor on the BCT so he did not stay with Wrenson very long either. It was an enjoyable place to work but sadly for Wrenson my mind was focused on science.
Those were the days, in the early 1950's when those who found there was more week than money and could ask for smaller quantities of things as most things were measured by weight then. It was also useful for those living alone who did not want large quantities particularly as most folk, at that time, did not have refrigerators - let alone even heard of a freezer.
Wrappings, what little there was, were mostly recycled, one way or another. Cartons could light fires, sugar bags were used at schools making small objects, paper bags were re-used to hold things that were needed in future but had to be kept in something that could be written upon, thus announcing the contents. There was not the waste of this century and the last trimestre of the 20th.
Hi
Re; the chap that cut himself has, reminded me of something my Nan once said. They’re not a good butcher unless they’ve lost a finger! Ha ha. Not sure if that’s true or not but George the butcher on Hartley Road Kingstanding had lost one of his fingers!
Thanks for prompting my memory.
Regards
Linda
 

Breconeer

Brummie babby
Just looked on Google street view, this is it now ( if i am correct )View attachment 127918
That corner shop (168 Gravelly Lane) was Tower Cycles when I got my Raleigh Blue Streak there on my 16th birthday in 1964. On Facebook ('Erdington Massives' page) I have this weekend been enquiring about No 181 opposite, on the corner of Oliver Road by the (now gone) phonebox, which is now a pizza shop but in the 1950s was Mr Conde's grocery shop. I would be interested in any images of it from that time (1950s into early 1960s). I recall he had a large woodframed estate car (or 'station wagon' or 'shooting brake') and I am interested to know what model that was. He kept it in a garage behind the shop (accessed via a rear driveway off Oliver Rd). Another local resident around the corner in Dean Road (Mr Tewson) apparently had a similar 'woodie' (a green one), though I don't recall seeing that despite living opposite!.
 

sandra6170

New Member
I worked for Wrensons Delivering groceries from their shops all over Erdington and Sutton, Solihull and Steelhouse lane shop, They had 3 shops in Erdington at one time, I covered all 3, this was around 1955/56
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Welcome Sandra. We have a Wrensons thread, which I’m sure you’ll find interesting. I am moving your post to that thread. Thanks for posting. Viv.

Edit, post now moved. V.
 

Edifi

master brummie
In1964-5 I worked for Warriner & Mason's in Smethwick and delivered grocery to all of the Wrensons shops.The worst one was the shop on the Stratford Rd at Shirley.You had to stop all the traffic to back into the yard to unload.
 

Simply Sally

New Member
I have a Ration Book 1952-1953 it belonged to a Mr Robson of South Yardley that shopped at Wrensons,157,Church Road,Yardley. Anyone remember this family?
 

sweeney todd

Brummie babby
Another firm, i think it might have been Fine Fare, gave Pink stamps (I think they were S & H pink stamps, whatever that stood for)
Mike
Hi...its an old post, but here goes:
S&H today

Sperry and Hutchison no longer has redemption centers but the company does offer online redemptions. The company is now called S&H Greenpoints and its website www.greenpoints.com launched in 2000.

If you found a few books of stamps in the back of a drawer, they can be redeemed for gift cards from the S&H Online Rewards catalog.

Further: www.al.com/living/2016/04/whatever_happened_to_sh_green.html
 
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