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When Everyone Wore A Hat...

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Wendy

Guest
Hat Factory 1.jpgHat Factory.jpg

Atherstone was well known for hat manufacturers. The pub in the town is still called The Hatters. I remember going to a shop a few years ago which was inside the hat factory, it was amazing stepping back in time. The factory is sadly closed now but the building is still there. The photo's are Hatton's Hat Manufacturers c1920.
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
Tried to magnify it as best I can. Still not sure, in particular whether gthe tube with the tap is connected to the tubes in the drink. I wonder if it is some crude sort of cooling device with the tubes in the drink connected to the top with the white lump being ice, and the tube coming out just being to drain off the water from the melted ice.

magnified_ldrink_container.jpg
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
I think the tube is for topping up the cordial and/aerating the drink. And as Mike suggested it passes through the bag suspended over the drink (in which ice is packed) to cool it. Looks like a fruit punch in the container., segments of oranges etc. A bit Heath Robinson, but it must have been difficult to produce it in any volume. Isn't there some scientific way to do with pressure which would allow it to be topped up through the overhanging tube? Otherwise the tube is used simply to pump air into the drink if it's meant to be aerated water as per the newspaper article. Viv..
 
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oldMohawk

master brummie
View attachment 97578View attachment 97579

Atherstone was well known for hat manufacturers. The pub in the town is still called The Hatters. I remember going to a shop a few years ago which was inside the hat factory, it was amazing stepping back in time. The factory is sadly closed now but the building is still there. The photo's are Hatton's Hat Manufacturers c1920.
Interesting photos Wendy of the inside of the factory, they seem to be making only one style of hat . Looking through the photos in this thread I haven't seen many people wearing that type of hat perhaps they were for sale overseas.

'Hattons' an apt name for a hat manufacturer ! :)
 
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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
On second thoughts, maybe the white bag is just a bag of air with which to aerate the drink. The tube being the mechanism for pumping air into the bag.

This bag of air (me) will now sign off! Viv
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Wendy - I like the hat factory photos very much. Look about 1920s judging by the younger ladies haircuts. There's a definite division of labour shown in the two photos. I think the finishing shop (adding the ribbons to the hats?) is definitely a female domain. Whilst the other photo of all men must have been more physically demanding part of the process. Although can't work out why. Viv.
 

Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Mommy, I told you if you didn't stop messing with that hat there would be no seats left.
 

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oldMohawk

master brummie
The Scotts Guard Band certainly drew a crowd, all wearing hats naturally !
I can only see one flat cap wearer, maybe he picked the wrong hat for the occasion .... :)
 
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Phil

Gone, but not forgotten.
Is Summerfield Park, Winson Green, still there?Paul


Summerfield Park is still there today, though I'm not sure if they still have a bandstand, even if they had, I'm sure it wouldn't draw the same amount of listeners today.
 

tim eborn

master brummie
It looks as if the girl on the right is taking her own picture with the aid of a "Selfie Stick" sure is a whole lot of puzzlement!
 

maypolebaz

master brummie
Interesting photos Wendy of the inside of the factory, they seem to be making only one style of hat . Looking through the photos in this thread I haven't seen many people wearing that type of hat perhaps they were for sale overseas.

'Hattons' an apt name for a hat manufacturer !
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People like Tom Mix, in the early cowboy photos, wore hats like those.
They look like Ten Gallon hats to me.
 
W

Wendy

Guest
I think stretching the felt was quite a difficult process, for this reason it was done by men. Big business too this is inside Wilson and Stafford another Atherstone factory. I think this one closed in the 90's.




Wilson and Stafford Hat factory.jpg
 

paul stacey

master brummie
Thanks Phil, went once or twice as kid, huge place in the middle of a massive built up area that was little surreal.Paul
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
That's strange Wendy seeing all those hats stacked in the early stages of manufacture. Well I assume they're unfinished. Quite incredible that they were produced in such volume.

And look at this. Google has picked up the hat conversation and we can all get our own handmade beanie knitted in the UK !! How times have changed. Viv.
 

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oldMohawk

master brummie
And look at this. Google has picked up the hat conversation and we can all get our own handmade beanie knitted in the UK !! How times have changed. Viv.
Good old Google doesn't miss much !

I think the wearing of hats in the late Victorian and Edwardian periods is something which defines the 'look' of those times for me.

Perhaps we will all be thought of as 'When Everyone Used Google' .... :)
 
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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Good old Google doesn't miss much !

I think the wearing of hats in the late Victorian and Edwardian periods is something which defines the 'look' of those times for me.

Perhaps we will all be thought of as 'When Everyone Used Google' ....
smile-new.png

I think a hat gave outfits a finishing touch. If chosen correctly it balanced the whole outfit. Today I think there's more emphasis on shoes and handbags to do that job. Viv.
 

devonjim

master brummie
Always thought there was some compulsion with regard to the "working class" wearing caps in early C20 but can't find any reference on Google so perhaps just an urban myth. Picture of my maternal grand dad with his "best"hat on his wedding day, he always wore a cap to work and in the garden but a trilby to go out. His best hat looks somewhat like the ones in the factory pictures don't you think.old family 12.jpg
 
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