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When Everyone Wore A Hat...

oldMohawk

master brummie
If you like to look at Britain when everyone wore a hat, here is a fascinating film clip digitally enhanced to play at the right speed. About 41sec in a dandy looking man realises he is on camera and brushes his moustache upwards in a military manner while pushing children out of the way.

As often happens with Youtube links the above video has been withdrawn. Will investigate if it is available from elsewhere. Meanwhile an altenative below showing hat wearing folk from long ago. Some scenes were in the original ... see the man swinging his umbrella ...
 
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Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Enjoyed the film. Throughout it I purposely tried to spot those without a hat. Out of the hundreds filmed I only spotted 5 or 6 ( and three of those were the ship's stewards). Surprisingly one was an elderly woman posing for a family photograph, maybe they were excused! Love the interest in the camera/photographer in the closing scenes. Viv.
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
My father always wore a trilby with a collar and tie to work on the railways right up till he retired in the 70s.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
I worked in an office in the 50s, 60s and the rule was ties must be worn. I was a late going to work one day and forgot to put my tie on, everyone was shocked. I had to dodge around the office avoiding the boss until lunchtime when I rushed home to get my tie and be properly dressed. I had a school cap but can't remember wearing it much, but during my time in the RAF I soon learnt that it was essential to wear a hat when in uniform.
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
If anyone is in doubt about present day hat etiquette, here's the trusty Debrett's advice. But do please note ladies, it is impossible to socially kiss while wearing a wide brimmed hat dahhhhhlings! I expect in earlier times, British people didn't socially kiss, I think that's a continental thing that's become the norm now. And all you men out there will need to practice your 'doffing'.Viv.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1369673759.440731.jpg
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
Ah, oM, you worked in an office whereas my father worked as a ganger/plate layer on the railways. My brother who worked as a field engineer for ICL had to wear a suit with his collar and tie. He often came home with his tie in ribbons where it had been caught in some machinery, usually one of the big, early printers.

When my wife went to school in Australia the girls got into trouble if the teacher (there was only one - a nun) caught them round the town in school uniform not wearing their hat and gloves.
 

Simon4130

master brummie
I am very much a hat person and have a variety of different trilbies and caps that I use depending on weather conditions or whatever the occasion is. However I am seen as very much an exception in these times when the only type of hat that is commonly seen is a baseball cap, wouldn't let one grace my head:sour: I also stand accused of being an "old fashioned" dresser:chargrined:

Simon
 
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Wendy

Guest
In the mid 60's my brother worked for Edward Mann in Brum not sure where it was. He was in sales and always had lots of samples. I remember the hat craze for closh hats after the film Bonny and Clyde they were great. I loved all the hats but I was a bit to young to wear them.
 

coerl21

master brummie
If a hat is lying around most people will try it on. I think people would like to wear hats but perhaps feel a bit self-conscious. I occasionally wear a cap made of different Irish tweeds - but my partner says I look like an OAP. I have to remind her I am an OAP! I would like to wear a trilby - but see above.
 

Oisin

gone but not forgotten
I've too have a cap made from Irish tweeds but only wear it when it's very cold or raining. I don't look like an OAP in it, just daft! :culpability:
 
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Wendy

Guest
Paul, Michael has one and when he wears it I say ohhh you have changed into your dad..:encouragement:
 

Radiorails

master brummie
School uniform used to have a cap which it was compulsory to wear with the rest of the uniform. Other than that no headgear was worn (not counting Indian Chiefs Warbonnets, military helmets and similar for those who were young enough to be seen playing street or field games. The Air Training Corps (and naturally other youth organizations which had uniform) gave you a beret. The R.A.F. and Fire Service provided peaked caps, berets were initial issue and frequently worn by other ranks. I would have preferred an R.A.F. forage cap but they were out of favour by the time I enlisted.

I find a baseball cap more than useful when in strong sunlight when in the garden plus living on a headland, where the wind frequently blows and from all compass directions, it stays on the head whereas trilby's and other town type hats would soon be out to sea. :friendly_wink: One type of hat that I would not wear is the flat cap type although here it is often favoured by farmers as it is a sensible working type of hat.

Those with long teeth and memories may remember the slogan of the late forties/early fifties which suggested that 'to get ahead you needed a hat'.
 

sistersue61

master brummie
I love hats used to go into BHS with mom and nan and try them on. When our wedding era was on , used to have a hat for each wedding and loved looking for them.
I guess I was work influenced too, alwys had a starched cap, except as a student when they were paper ones, really liked my cap, it showed people that you were a nurse not a cleaner and covered a multitude of sins on bad hair days!!
Sue
 

coerl21

master brummie
I agree that a baseball cap is really useful- especially if you wear glasses and it's raining. However to be really cool wear it backwards AND it stops rain trickling down your neck
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
I've seen that video before and it never fails to move me, maybe it's the fitting music score.
I love this period in history, always seemed very stylish to me...
I look at it often and see something different each time. I like the man walking along the sea front with his lady friend, he seems so happy he swings his umbrella in a complete circle, and women wearing hats with so many flowers they look like walking flowerbeds.
The music does suit the film, I wonder what it is ?
 

cookie273uk

master brummie
In the RAF (1948-56) I have worn forage cap, beret, peaked cap, flying helmet and in West Africa we were issued with a delightful Australian bush hat, now I just occasionally wear a soft tweed brimmed hat usually when its cold as I am bald as a coot on top !!! Eric
 

brumgum

Proud to be a Brummie!
I look at it often and see something different each time. I like the man walking along the sea front with his lady friend, he seems so happy he swings his umbrella in a complete circle, and women wearing hats with so many flowers they look like walking flowerbeds.
The music does suit the film, I wonder what it is ?
It's called Chanson Du Soir (Evening Song) Here it has lyrics...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9rJ7WMLef4
 

Vivienne14

Super Moderator
Staff member
Women nowadays probably prefer not to wear hats due to the 'flat hair' problem. Having worn a beret every day for school I certainly wouldn't dream of putting myself through the misery of flat hair again, no way. Now there's a niche in the market; a hat that doesn't produce the flat hair effect.Viv.
 
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