• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

Watery Lane

cookie273uk

master brummie
Astonesse's pic 3 post 111 shows Victoria (VIC) PO Telephone Exchange on the right, spent a few visit's there in 50's/60's, that brings back memories, at the time I used to maintain 'Blues' telephone system and press box 'phones - and I was an ardent Villa fan at the time being born in Aston ! Eric
s
 

exwag

Brummie babby
Commentary to the above photograph of Watery Lane, taken circa 1960 [?]. This is the only photograph I have ever come across showing this part of Watery Lane and also where my Grandparents David John and Leah Kettle lived for 1905, where my Mother and myself were born, at No 89. The photograph has been taken from close to the corner of Kingston Hill and is the side running from Adderley St towards the canal bridge beyond Keeley St. When I lived there the metal merchants plot was just a bomb site cleared of rubble. The shop was owned by a Mrs Quinney - who legend had it kept a 5lb tin of red pepper in her bedroom, ready to throw it over any German troops who might have made it to Watery Lane in WWII!. Mrs Quinney made a killing with the pepper once the war was over. Following to road to the right, the No 19 bus stop is outside a large entry down where my best mate, David Hoccom, lived. Further along is a bombed out gap where we "minded" parked cars during any football matches at St Andrews. At this point it is perhaps better to count chimney pots...... the last double set is No 89 where I lived. By 1945 the last two remaining houses of No 5 Court had been bombed out, Wiseman's Metal works loomed over the back yard, and a busy semi open air Wood Yard was after our house. Semi open air because most of the roof had gone when it was bombed. The white vertical line immediately below the last two chimney pots is a reflection of David John's double fronted shop window. He seems to have had a thriving business in the repair and hire of bicycles and vulcanising anything he could get his hands on! David John died in November 1940, and Leah died in January 1961
 

Sunbeam12

New Member
hello formula t I posted a reply a week or two ago but just i pressed to post my internet went down so I ended up not knowing you got my reply or not so hear i go again the shop run by Mr & Mrs gaunt I can remember the bacon slicing machine they cut bacon and corn beef on the same machine they cut cheese with a wire they let people have things on the strap in other words credit they come back many years collect money they
were still owed Mr gaunt was a cripple. in the lane there was a shop run by Mrs qiney a little old lady. please forgive me if I got the spelling of quiney wrong by for now edward
Hi, I can remember shop sitting with my Mum, for my Godmother, Ann Payne. She used to run a shop that sounds remarkably like that, on Watery Lane. I too can remember being fascinated by the Bacon slicer! This must have been around 1965ish? She had a daughter called Andrea. I can remember playing with some lovely little girls who lived in one of the houses opposite. From what I can remember one of them drowned in the lake of the nearby park.
 

urddas

New Member
Hi everyone. I'm trying to research my late grandfather's family and have hit a wall with census and BDM records so hope someones local knowledge might help.

My grandfather was adopted but we believe he was born William Allen in 1920, and his biological parents were William Allen and Florence Allen (nee Tyler) of 207 Watery Lane.

Appreciate it's a stab in the dark, but would be grateful for any pointers.

Thanks

Huw
 
I have a rather unusual view of Watery Lane that is probably filed under street furniture. It is actually labelled Garrison Lane which is on the right as it snakes around Callowfields Recreation Ground. If the photographer turned to the left you would see the Sailors' Return public-house. The photograph centres on a drinking fountain and cattle trough, along with a circular lavatory with cast-iron screen next to its entrance. Although the photographer is stood close to the junction of Lawley Street and Lower Dartmouth Street, the thoroughfare to the left is Lawley Street. Anyway, an interesting bit of street furniture of which only a few survive these days.
 

Attachments

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
I have a rather unusual view of Watery Lane that is probably filed under street furniture. It is actually labelled Garrison Lane which is on the right as it snakes around Callowfields Recreation Ground. If the photographer turned to the left you would see the Sailors' Return public-house. The photograph centres on a drinking fountain and cattle trough, along with a circular lavatory with cast-iron screen next to its entrance. Although the photographer is stood close to the junction of Lawley Street and Lower Dartmouth Street, the thoroughfare to the left is Lawley Street. Anyway, an interesting bit of street furniture of which only a few survive these days.
brilliant photo kieron...all gone now of course...

lyn
 

Welshsaxon

New Member
Sheri have just found this photo of Mr and Mrs Gibbon with one of their lads either Harry or David. Do you recognise them. This was taken about 46 years ago when they moved to Aldridge road. Thanks. Jean.
Hi GG Jean, Im related to the Gibbons and would love to see the pic you have, could you repost it as seems to disappeared ...
 
Top