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Transport Companies in Birmingham.

S

Stitcher

Guest
Dumfries.jpg
It was obviously years after this image but The Sands is where I used to have bed and breakfast when I did 3 trips a week to Dumfries. Lovely place and lovely people.
 

landcrab9

knowlegable brummie
View attachment 120221
Earlier in this thread I said I drove for Road Services Caledonian, This is the same model eight wheeler that I drove for thousands and thousands of miles for tat company.
Hi Stitcher , in 1961 I put one of these Hippo's in the river at Water Orton. I did a stint for Horace Bridges in Minworth. Coming down the hill out of Water Orton towards Minworth freezing cold ,black ice everywhere, overloaded with railway scrap from Water Orton sidings, had to hit the brakes because an idiot car driver coming the other way over the single carriageway bridge, went into A skid, SPLASH through the parapet. Took all day to recover it but we did it ourselves, using our own cranes and the Hippo was back on the road next day. The river was only about 2 feet deep. Happy days.
Bryan.
 

nickcc101

master brummie
Hi Stitcher , in 1961 I put one of these Hippo's in the river at Water Orton. I did a stint for Horace Bridges in Minworth. Coming down the hill out of Water Orton towards Minworth freezing cold ,black ice everywhere, overloaded with railway scrap from Water Orton sidings, had to hit the brakes because an idiot car driver coming the other way over the single carriageway bridge, went into A skid, SPLASH through the parapet. Took all day to recover it but we did it ourselves, using our own cranes and the Hippo was back on the road next day. The river was only about 2 feet deep. Happy days.
Bryan.
Just jumping onto an old post. All the eight wheeler Leyland I've ever worked on, including the pre LAD cab, were called Octopus. All the Hippos I've ever worked on were 6x4 six wheelers. Was the Hippo in the picture a Norde conversion where the second steer axle was added ?
 
My dad was a lorry driver most of his life. He worked for A.J.Gupwell. He would often drive to London, which was an overnight trip (can you believe it) 20 mph all the way...A big treat for me was going with him, not very often, because most of the time he had a trailer, which required a mate, so I would have to sit on the bonnet, which had a metal cover with a blanket over it, it wasn't very comfortable and it was hot & noisy in the cab. It was worth it though...My dad had digs in Bermondsey and we would stop at Tubby Isaac's on the way home. I would have whelks and my dad had cockles. Incidentally, there was a Tubby's transport cafe on the A45, not sure where it was...
Dave A
 
My dad was a lorry driver most of his life. He worked for A.J.Gupwell. He would often drive to London, which was an overnight trip (can you believe it) 20 mph all the way...A big treat for me was going with him, not very often, because most of the time he had a trailer, which required a mate, so I would have to sit on the bonnet, which had a metal cover with a blanket over it, it wasn't very comfortable and it was hot & noisy in the cab. It was worth it though...My dad had digs in Bermondsey and we would stop at Tubby Isaac's on the way home. I would have whelks and my dad had cockles. Incidentally, there was a Tubby's transport cafe on the A45, not sure where it was...
Dave A
Dear Dave,
I have just joined this site. I was interested to see that your father had been a driver for A,J, Gupwell Transport. This company had been established, in 1920, by my father, then 17 years old, and his elder brother, who had been an officer in the artillery during the First World War. My uncle had been aware that the United States Army, which had entered the war in 1917, had used a lot of motor transport, rather than horses. At the end of the War, the Americans decided to leave these lorries in Europe, rather than bring them back to the United States, and they were going cheap. My uncle, L.W. Gupwell, persuaded his father, A.J. Gupwell, who ran a shopfitting company in Birmingham, to purchase about sixty of these lorries, with a view to keeping a few for the shopfitting business and selling off the rest at a profit. However, in the depressed economic circumstances after the War, he found that he was unable to find buyers, so he decided to set up a road haulage business, then a new phenomenon. My father, C.G. Gupwell, who was mechanically-minded, was happy to join him in this venture. The company eventually had depots in Birmingham, London, Liverpool and Manchester and a fleet or around sixty long-distance lorries. My uncle became a prominent member of the Road Haulage Association in Birmingham and, seemingly, was on good terms with Ernest Bevin, then the General Secretary of the Transport and General Workers' Union (later Foreign Minister under C.R. Attlee). During the Second World War, the company worked under the Ministry of War Transport and was then brought into public ownership, in 1948, as part of British Road Services. However, the two brothers then established a new company, Gupwell Transport Contracts Ltd, which focussed on short-haul delivery vans, which had been exempt from nationalisation. They eventually built up a fleet of over one hundred vans, operating mostly for the Cadbury-Fry chocolate business, covering much of northern England and Scotland and operating our of depots in Leeds, Gateshead and Paisley. My uncle passed away in the mid-1950s, after which my father took over the running of the company, until he retired in the late 1970s, shortly after which the company was wound up, I worked with my father for a short time at his office in Bradford Street after leaving school in 1962 and before going to university in 1964. During that time, I attended evening classes at the Birmingham College of Commerce and managed to pass the graduate exams of the Institute of Transport. However, after completing my university studies, in 1970, I went abroad the following year in pursuit of work and only returned to the West Midlands in 2014. I should be grateful to read any other stories regarding the Gupwell transport businesses, as I should like to write a paper on this if ever I can find the time. Kind regards, Richard Gupwell
 

adap2it

master brummie
Dear Dave,
I have just joined this site. I was interested to see that your father had been a driver for A,J, Gupwell Transport. This company had been established, in 1920, by my father, then 17 years old, and his elder brother, who had been an officer in the artillery during the First World War. My uncle had been aware that the United States Army, which had entered the war in 1917, had used a lot of motor transport, rather than horses. At the end of the War, the Americans decided to leave these lorries in Europe, rather than bring them back to the United States, and they were going cheap. My uncle, L.W. Gupwell, persuaded his father, A.J. Gupwell, who ran a shopfitting company in Birmingham, to purchase about sixty of these lorries, with a view to keeping a few for the shopfitting business and selling off the rest at a profit. However, in the depressed economic circumstances after the War, he found that he was unable to find buyers, so he decided to set up a road haulage business, then a new phenomenon. My father, C.G. Gupwell, who was mechanically-minded, was happy to join him in this venture. The company eventually had depots in Birmingham, London, Liverpool and Manchester and a fleet or around sixty long-distance lorries. My uncle became a prominent member of the Road Haulage Association in Birmingham and, seemingly, was on good terms with Ernest Bevin, then the General Secretary of the Transport and General Workers' Union (later Foreign Minister under C.R. Attlee). During the Second World War, the company worked under the Ministry of War Transport and was then brought into public ownership, in 1948, as part of British Road Services. However, the two brothers then established a new company, Gupwell Transport Contracts Ltd, which focussed on short-haul delivery vans, which had been exempt from nationalisation. They eventually built up a fleet of over one hundred vans, operating mostly for the Cadbury-Fry chocolate business, covering much of northern England and Scotland and operating our of depots in Leeds, Gateshead and Paisley. My uncle passed away in the mid-1950s, after which my father took over the running of the company, until he retired in the late 1970s, shortly after which the company was wound up, I worked with my father for a short time at his office in Bradford Street after leaving school in 1962 and before going to university in 1964. During that time, I attended evening classes at the Birmingham College of Commerce and managed to pass the graduate exams of the Institute of Transport. However, after completing my university studies, in 1970, I went abroad the following year in pursuit of work and only returned to the West Midlands in 2014. I should be grateful to read any other stories regarding the Gupwell transport businesses, as I should like to write a paper on this if ever I can find the time. Kind regards, Richard Gupwell
I was only 8 years old when "nationalism" was established in Britain, so I have very little to offer regarding Gupwell's transport. I know that my father drove for them prior to becoming BRS, because it became a big topic of conversation that I quickly became aware of. My dad was a very prominent member of the Transport & General Workers Union and was elated that transportation was to become publicly owned. My brother and I had a large collection of Dinky Toys Lorries that my dad proceeded to paint red, added the BRS lettering and logo's, all by hand...However, the reality of public ownership soon became a major source of disappointment for my dad. The pride that most drivers took in their vehicles pre BRS, quickly disappeared as lorries were no longer driven by the same drivers and subsequently drove my dad to seek employment elsewhere. I must add that this was the beginning of the end for my dad's socialist dreams.
Dave A
 

NoddKD

master brummie
hi my dad worked his way up from driver to transport manager with overland transport from early 60s untill just befor sold out to i think walkers? no thay never run coachs but thay did drive them for james coachs old joe hands started overland then his son donald and my dad dennis started driving for him


Hi Kingsley, I see from your later post that your dad was called Ragg. Are you of the Ragg family that lived in Hove Rd next to the Kirby family,two sisters Linda & Arlene?

NoddKD. (Formerly Bernard Dunn of Circular Rd)
 

Richarddye

master brummie
I was only 8 years old when "nationalism" was established in Britain, so I have very little to offer regarding Gupwell's transport. I know that my father drove for them prior to becoming BRS, because it became a big topic of conversation that I quickly became aware of. My dad was a very prominent member of the Transport & General Workers Union and was elated that transportation was to become publicly owned. My brother and I had a large collection of Dinky Toys Lorries that my dad proceeded to paint red, added the BRS lettering and logo's, all by hand...However, the reality of public ownership soon became a major source of disappointment for my dad. The pride that most drivers took in their vehicles pre BRS, quickly disappeared as lorries were no longer driven by the same drivers and subsequently drove my dad to seek employment elsewhere. I must add that this was the beginning of the end for my dad's socialist dreams.
Dave A
Very well written Dave!
 
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