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Thomas Walker

T

TheScribbler

Guest
Hello - I hope you can help me with a bit of research I'm doing.

I'm trying to find out about Thomas Walker, as in the Thomas Walker building in St Paul's Square.

I understand he was a leader of the city council for a while and that he instigated the replacement of the city's block paving with blue brick, so was known as Blue-brick Walker. He also owned the Thomas Walker building, which was a bucklemakers.

That's all I know and I can't find a resource anywhere to read more about him. Can anyone help, either with first-hand knowledge or a book/website with more information?

Many thanks
 

Alberta

Super Moderator
Staff member
The grave of Thomas Walker ,inventor and manufacturuer of the blue engineering brick is in Key hill Cemetery.
It is lying down and has a brick wall imprinted at the bottom.
If you go to the Cemetery section on this forum and post on Key Hill I am sure that Wendy will find some info. for you.
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
hi alberta
first of al i never knew the man and i was not aware of his postion in the city nor the story of the blue brick during my time
in being employed there many years ago at thomas walkers
during my youth i had worked there twice, as you may or not know or seen recently on the forum of the previous plating company
that i did state my trade occupation was an electro plater / anodiser
which is truly true i learnt all aspects of the proffession
and i also said that i had worked most electro compamies
around the cicuit of hockley and the jewley quarter
as you have said they are or was buckle makers ,i say that because i do not know whether they are stil there or not
i worked there for three years ,firstly . they make there own studs and buckles of all discriptions you name the buckle for any item
and they produce it from start to finish from bear metal fittings
then degrease the metal and plate it in what ever finish
they want gold or nickle colour
there elrctro plant was the old barrel plating which is done in a spinning barrel with chemicals and running cold water
they would be in lines of twenty four in a line
it was a fairly paid job by them employed alot of family opinated
where mother daughter and sons worked there
there offices was kept but stil in the victorian time surrounding
dezign i would have said they was one of the oldest plating in the busness i left and went to a smal company by the name of randell brothers on old dartmouth round about in the old city
i was told the pay is excellent . but the condition was very appalling
the building was falling down around you there was great big gaping holes in the walls and it backed on to the cannal
the holes in the wall so large you couldhave a conversation
with any person strollong along the tow pathe of the cannal
after a couple of weeks i went back to thomas,s
they welcomed mr back with open arms, because i was a true proffessional in the trade you doknow what you are doing and know your chemicals when you are in the plating and anodosing
because you use electri currents to convert these metals with
various metals thomas walkers had a high reputation in the field of plating thomas walkers are world wide known as the barrel platers in the world ,but you have leart me some history today about thomas ; all the years i had worked there i never seen a director
you was always dealt and seen under directors snd shop floor managers at christmas the tan hoy would come on and he would give us is approval and thank you for our services and wish us all a happy new year
the only other place i can recall where the company directer
in a electro platers company ever done and spoke to the work force
and wish us a merry christmas and a happy new year was
miller brothers in aston brook street
alberta have a nice day best wishes astonian ;;;;
 
W

Wendy

Guest
Here is the grave of Thomas Walker this is another one which is due to be restored to it's upright position.:)

I took a closer photo of the foot of the grave to show the brick design with the coat of arms and the word forward!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
T

TheScribbler

Guest
Thank you, people. I appreciate you taking the time to respond to me.

If anyone else has any Thomas Walker facts (or sources of facts), please do post. It seems he wasn't quite as well known as I was led to believe!
 

cazap

proper brummie kid
I Know I'm a bit late but i am researching Thomas Walker Buckle maker of St Pauls Square....I do know quite a lot if you are interested
 

pollypops

master brummie
The person who started this thread TheScribbler is shown as a guest - this means they are no longer a member of the forum - just thought I would mention this in case you wonder why he/she doesn't respond :adoration:
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
The grave of Thomas Walker ,inventor and manufacturuer of the blue engineering brick is in Key hill Cemetery.
It is lying down and has a brick wall imprinted at the bottom.
If you go to the Cemetery section on this forum and post on Key Hill I am sure that Wendy will find some info. for you.

See here, don’t think he invented blue brick.
 

Astoness

TRUE BRUMMIE MODERATOR
Staff member
well i certainly hope he did pedro because some years ago we rescued some blue bricks from the site of the winfield brass company which was undergoing an archeological dig in preparation for the new library being built...i am sure that key hill brian laid some of those bricks around the grave of thomas walker

lyn
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
Viv’s post on the other thread mentions Thomas Walker (died 1871) and the Walker Building, which is still there in Oxford Street. I’m not sure the first post here is correct, can’t yet see a Thomas Walker in St Paul’s Square. There was a Zaccherius Walker.

Certainly he was influential in the blue brick use, and the examples that he used were from the Potteries where he was born. He lived in Speedwell, Pershore Road, Edgbaston.

 

lww

Brummie babby
I am new to this site, so I might need some guidance. I noticed this thread about Thomas Walker who is my husband's great great grandfather. His great grandfather left England around 1905 and landed in the U.S. Apparently there was no more contact with the family in Birmingham. We visited Birmingham in 2014 and did some research then. We have been very intrigued by the large amount of information I have gathered, but am stuck on four things. 1. Who were his parents? His mother was a sister of Edward Massey, so I think her name is Ann. I find a William and Margarett that are possible. He was supposed to have been born in Burslem, but the Masseys were from Stoke upon Trent. 2. I cannot find him in the 1851 census. 3. His wife is Sarah, but I don't know her maiden name. She died between 1841-1861, but I can't find a record. I have sent a query to Key Hill Cemetery where he is buried. 4. I am curious whether there are any living descendants still in Birmingham. Thanks for any help you can give me. Linda
 

Pedrocut

Master Barmmie
“He was supposed to have been born in Burslem, but the Masseys were from Stoke upon Trent”

Burslem is one of the “five Towns” making up Stoke on Trent.
 
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MWS

master brummie
A little digging though not sure if the 2 Thomas Walkers mentioned are the same person.

Apologies if this info has already been mentioned.

The death of the Thomas Walker buried 1871 in Key Hill Cemetery was registered in Kings Norton and mentioned in the Bham Daily Post & Bham Daily Gazette on 28th March.

There are 2 addresses mentioned - Speedwell House, Pershore Road where he appeared to be residing in 1861 and Oxford Street where he was residing in 1841 and was mentioned in the newspaper clipping on thread linked to above.

Thomas was listed as a stove maker in 1841 & 1861 and was a councillor for St Martin's Ward. So probably not a manufacturer of blue bricks.

He appears to have had 3 children Victoria Louisa (1836), Thomas Ferdinand (1838) & Sarah Ann (1840) who died young. Mother's maiden name for Thomas & Sarah is given as Sant, making their mother Sarah Sant though I can't find a marriage.

Here's where I'm not sure if the Thomas Walker mentioned by lww is the same one or I've misunderstood the post because his only son Thomas Ferdinand appears to have lived his whole life in Bham/Edgbaston dying in 1921.
 
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lww

Brummie babby
“He was supposed to have been born in Burslem, but the Masseys were from Stoke upon Trent”

Burslem is one of the “five Towns” making up Stoke on Trent.

Thanks. That helps to understand the geography and layout of the land. I've been looking at lots of maps. Thanks again.
 

lww

Brummie babby
A little digging though not sure if the 2 Thomas Walkers mentioned are the same person.

Apologies if this info has already been mentioned.

The death of the Thomas Walker buried 1871 in Key Hill Cemetery was registered in Kings Norton and mentioned in the Bham Daily Post & Bham Daily Gazette on 28th March.

There are 2 addresses mentioned - Speedwell House, Pershore Road where he appeared to be residing in 1861 and Oxford Street where he was residing in 1841 and was mentioned in the newspaper clipping on thread linked to above.

Thomas was listed as a stove maker in 1841 & 1861 and was a councillor for St Martin's Ward. So probably not a manufacturer of blue bricks.

He appears to have had 3 children Victoria Louisa (1836), Thomas Ferdinand (1838) & Sarah Ann (1840) who died young. Mother's maiden name for Thomas & Sarah is given as Sant, making their mother Sarah Sant though I can't find a marriage.

Here's where I'm not sure if the Thomas Walker mentioned by lww is the same one or I've misunderstood the post because his only son Thomas Ferdinand appears to have lived his whole life in Bham/Edgbaston dying in 1921.
The Thomas Walker you describe is the right one, b. 1805 d. 1871 stove and nautical
A little digging though not sure if the 2 Thomas Walkers mentioned are the same person.

Apologies if this info has already been mentioned.

The death of the Thomas Walker buried 1871 in Key Hill Cemetery was registered in Kings Norton and mentioned in the Bham Daily Post & Bham Daily Gazette on 28th March.

There are 2 addresses mentioned - Speedwell House, Pershore Road where he appeared to be residing in 1861 and Oxford Street where he was residing in 1841 and was mentioned in the newspaper clipping on thread linked to above.

Thomas was listed as a stove maker in 1841 & 1861 and was a councillor for St Martin's Ward. So probably not a manufacturer of blue bricks.

He appears to have had 3 children Victoria Louisa (1836), Thomas Ferdinand (1838) & Sarah Ann (1840) who died young. Mother's maiden name for Thomas & Sarah is given as Sant, making their mother Sarah Sant though I can't find a marriage.

Here's where I'm not sure if the Thomas Walker mentioned by lww is the same one or I've misunderstood the post because his only son Thomas Ferdinand appears to have lived his whole life in Bham/Edgbaston dying in 1921.

Thank you for all your information. This is the correct Thomas Walker, b. 1805 d. 1871, stove and nautical instrument maker, along with other business pursuits. He lived first on Oxford Street where the Walker Building is located, then on Pershore.
I would love to obtain copies of the newspapers posted on March 28, 1871. Any suggestions on how to do that?
You're right, Thomas didn't manufacture blue bricks. He was on the committee to purchase them. I think I saw a previous letter telling about that.
I didn't know about a child, Sarah Ann since she wasn't listed in the 1841 census.
Thanks for the name Sant for Thomas' wife, Sarah. Actually, Thomas Walker married a second wife the year before they died. They had a son, John Massey Walker, who is my husband's great grandfather. Thomas Ferdinand and Victoria Louisa would be half siblings.
Thanks again so much.
 

MWS

master brummie
The newspaper clippings are on findmypast, if someone with a subscription notices then they might post them.

And Thomas' father's name should be on his marriage certificate to Sarah Coonan.
 
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lww

Brummie babby
The newspaper clippings are on findmypast, if someone with a subscription notices then they might post them.

And Thomas' father's name should be on his marriage certificate to Sarah Coonan.
Wow! I just ordered it. Thanks so much. 6-7 weeks I'll have an answer. You are the best!
 
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MWS

master brummie
And one more. They had another daughter, Emily, baptised 24 Oct 1834 Burslem (Wesleyan Methodist). Mother is listed as Sarah Sant. Emily dies, unfortunately, a few days later and was buried 30 Oct 1834.
 
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