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Think Tank

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Went to Thinktank again yesterday! Had some free vouchers to use, so might as well take stuff I didn't take last year!



Will put some pics in the picture thead!
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Back to Thinktank yesterday on Good Friday (as I had recieved some free entry vouchers as one of my photos of the BT Tower was used in an exhibition last year).

This is why I got the free vouchers last year:



They used it in an exhibition in Summer 2013 (but I couldn't go back to Thinktank back then!)

Instead I saw it for free at BM & AG last year



I could have gone to see it at Thinktank (but it was during the working week - last few days of July, first few days of August 2013)
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Science Garden part 3

Build a bridge - I have memories as a kid of the version at the old science museum! Either a remake or the old one?









 

Harbornite76

master brummie
I have mixed feelings about the original post, there are plenty of attractions on show such as the Supermarine Spitfire and LMS Princess Coronation Class pacific 46235 "City of Birmingham". However the prices are a bit steep, and some of the exhibits are poorly sited.
 

rosie

brummie
Thank you ellbrown, I particularly like your "We made it" section". Lovely Chad Valley Toys!
I'm glad all those lovely machines are safely preserved.
rosie.
 

PGS4038

proper brummie kid
I spent most of my young Saturdays at Newhall Street. I would get a return train to Snow Hill from Soho & Winson Green station, then do some trainspotting at Snow Hill and /or New street and then if it was cold, spend the afternoon in the Engineering Hall at the science museum. The highlight each year was a ride around town on the back of a steam lorry during the Steam Rally, trying not to fall off the back as it accelerated up Newhall Street! The think tank just doesn't do it for me.
 

Richarddye

master brummie
I spent most of my young Saturdays at Newhall Street. I would get a return train to Snow Hill from Soho & Winson Green station, then do some trainspotting at Snow Hill and /or New street and then if it was cold, spend the afternoon in the Engineering Hall at the science museum. The highlight each year was a ride around town on the back of a steam lorry during the Steam Rally, trying not to fall off the back as it accelerated up Newhall Street! The think tank just doesn't do it for me.
Absolutely agree!
 

Jonob

master brummie
Newhall Square 2019. On Newhall Street, The Whitmore Collection under construction next to the old Elkington Electroplating Works.






Can Viv merge this thread with this one?


Perhaps under the title "Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry".
Congrats on getting one of your photo's published in last Thursdays Birmingham Mail, lovely picture, John.
 

ellbrown

ell brown on Flickr
Congrats on getting one of your photo's published in last Thursdays Birmingham Mail, lovely picture, John.
Thank you. If you mean Selly Manor on Thursday. Also had one at the Bullring on Wednesday (two days in a row).

You will also find my photos in the new Birmingham We Are 2020 Charity Calendar, which they are launching this week. Got my copy today.
 

Spargone

master brummie
Much of it, apart from those exhibits saved from the Newhall Street museum, is aimed at very young children. This is a good thing..
It is a truism that children don't change. Every parent soon discovers that the cardboard box is more attractive to the young child than the contents. It is the adults that think that what is presented to children has to be updated. A few bright plastic balls may get more children playing but it won't inspire any of them to become engineers whereas a working beam engine will still fascinate those that want to take up engineering.

I am reminded of the old joke, Q. "Why are Irish jokes so stupid?" A. "So the English can understand them!" It isn't the children that don't understand old books and museums, it's the adults!
 

BrummyPaul

knowlegable brummie
I think you're right Spargone. I do honestly understand those that champion the Think Tank kind of thing, I really do. But most little kids are attracted to the play areas which, to be fair, do seem to be themed toward science education. It's an entertainment experience as much as anything. So now we pay for it big time! So, taking your theme further, maybe adults have taken the entertaining aspect a little too far in some cases. Yes, mine was a much quieter experience. It required dad to explain, to talk to me. To first learn himself so that he could educate me properly. So it became intimate, formed a bond that I am forever grateful for. So for that I thank my dad for what we shared and for the lifelong interest in our Heritage that he has given me. Maybe it's true that most young adults have little time for that shared learning so the more instant 'entertainment' approach is now more successful. But back then, we depended on the smell of the oil, the beautifully engineered parts, slightly less colourful explanations. We were therefore stretched and dependant on dad to help us understand. But this stretching upwards inspired us, and the achievement of understanding was all the more satisfying and long lasting. Having said all this, I'm sure I simply have to accept that I've joined the Dinosaurs!
 

mikejee

Super Moderator
Staff member
From post in Old Science museum thread:

From 1951 to 1997 the Museum of Science & Industry was open to the public in Newhall Street. Artefacts and entire collections relating to the history and development of science and technology and to local industry were acquired. The exhibits range from a mainline locomotive to the smallest size of mapping pen nib and from machines to be found in the home to specialised scientific instruments. The collections have been given designated status because of their national importance, particularly machine tools and production machinery. Many artefacts were received with sample products and documentation, which provide an excellent resource for interpreting our manufacturing heritage.
From 2001 a number of important objects have been displayed at Thinktank, Birmingham’s Science Museum. Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery later established the Museum Collections Centre to provide access to the stored collections and a resource for research and learning. Along with Archive and Reference Library, the collections are available for research by appointment.
 
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RobT

master brummie
Was there a locomotive in the old science museum in Newhall Street in the 1950s?
Hasn't this one been in storage somewhere as the Think Tank didn't have room for it
Obviously I'm talking pre 1964 when City Of Birmingham arrived
 

Richarddye

master brummie
Paul, I thinks your comments are right on point! While I no longer live in Brum I so loved that museum it’s easy access and the romance of everything that was there. They day I beat the droughts machine was absolutely magical (I was lucky).

Reading Mike post #158, as well as others it seems that Brum has abdicated its lineage in industry. As a retired engineer and passionate student of the Industrial Revolution it is most disappointing.

I have been fortunate to travel the world with my work and visit so many like museums and have been proud to talk about the museum on Newhall St!


I think you're right Spargone. I do honestly understand those that champion the Think Tank kind of thing, I really do. But most little kids are attracted to the play areas which, to be fair, do seem to be themed toward science education. It's an entertainment experience as much as anything. So now we pay for it big time! So, taking your theme further, maybe adults have taken the entertaining aspect a little too far in some cases. Yes, mine was a much quieter experience. It required dad to explain, to talk to me. To first learn himself so that he could educate me properly. So it became intimate, formed a bond that I am forever grateful for. So for that I thank my dad for what we shared and for the lifelong interest in our Heritage that he has given me. Maybe it's true that most young adults have little time for that shared learning so the more instant 'entertainment' approach is now more successful. But back then, we depended on the smell of the oil, the beautifully engineered parts, slightly less colourful explanations. We were therefore stretched and dependant on dad to help us understand. But this stretching upwards inspired us, and the achievement of understanding was all the more satisfying and long lasting. Having said all this, I'm sure I simply have to accept that I've joined the Dinosaurs!
 
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