• Welcome to this forum . We are a worldwide group with a common interest in Birmingham and its history. While here, please follow a few simple rules. We ask that you respect other members, thank those who have helped you and please keep your contributions on-topic with the thread.

    We do hope you enjoy your visit. BHF Admin Team

They Were Caught In Our Old Street Pics...

oldMohawk

master brummie
Yeh and all the women do now is press a couple of buttons they don't know they are born Raz X
Looking again at that old pic reminds me that my Mum had a mangle just like in the pic and a posh like the women are holding, but with a galvanised metal tub. Washdays in our road were a Monday ritual when every housewife did their household washing.

It started with the gas boiler being lit early in the morning ready to boil the whites such as sheets and pillowcases. These would be rinsed using 'Recketts Blue' to make them look extra white. When not at school I would help turning the mangle making sure I did not get my fingers in the gears.

'Poshing' in the tub was a strenuous job and then rinsing and wringing before everything was hung out to dry on the clothes line. I remember the clothes up and down the road flapping in the wind with the occasional disaster of a clothes line breaking and some washing having to be done again.

There are a number of photos on the forum which were taken on days when everyone had hung out washing to dry. The pic below shows washing pegged out on lines in gardens behind the Kingstanding Odeon.
Untitled.jpgwashday.jpg

Perhaps the collective 'washing Mondays' came from times when folk who lived in courtyards did communal clothes washing on set days. Towards the the end of the 1950s low cost washing machines started to be sold in Britain and things started to change.

Our old gas boiler was used for steaming homemade Christmas puddings ... for hours !
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Yes Eric ... I seem to have heard the term 'Dolly' but for some reason my mum called it a 'posh'. I don't know where these names came from.

I do remember my mum looking up and down the gardens and commenting about the whiteness (or lack of it) of neighbour's sheets etc.
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
I have a friend here who comments more on the order the stuffs hung out than the whiteness although she does comment on that too.
If socks aren't hung in matching pairs or towels hung separately from shirts or coloureds mixed with whites etc. they get a thumbs down. :)
 

lmr3103

master brummie
I have a friend here who comments more on the order the stuffs hung out than the whiteness although she does comment on that too.
If socks aren't hung in matching pairs or towels hung separately from shirts or coloureds mixed with whites etc. they get a thumbs down. :)

Even though I have a tumble drier I do love to get my washing blowing on the line. Eric, I too am a bit fussy about the order I peg it in... I know... I should get a life!
Lynn.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
Where I lived anyone who left their washing out overnight was always got a thumbs-down ... :rolleyes:

In 1920s Selly Oak the factory chimneys were smoking but it was 'washing day' and most housewives in the district hung out their washing. Some people standing in Gleave Road looking up at an aeroplane were caught in this pic ..;)
SellyOak1920.jpg
 

chrissweep

master brummie
I've always known it as a dolly
I believe the wooden version was a " Dolly " and the copper version was a " Posser" . Both did the same job , the Dolly perhaps with more brute force and the Posser was more sophisticated and more kindred to modern day washing machines, but in a manual way. There was also the Scrubbing Board which we shouldn't forget, immortalised in the Skiffle groups of the 50's.
 
Top