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They Were Caught In Our Old Street Pics...

oldMohawk

master brummie
Platform 6 at Snow Hill station in 1962 and that young train-spotter looks slightly sad probably because '5025 Chirk Castle' is pulling the train when he was hoping to spot another 'namer' he did not have in his book. When I was young, I often wore sandals like he is wearing.
Platform6Snowhill1962.jpg
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The pic has to be dated between 1948 and 1963. Her home sheds were, post nationalization, Bristol (Bath Road), Oxford and the last Hereford. I believe the pic might be when she was at Hereford as she does not appear to be on a 'crack' express run.
Since I retired from paid work I have always worn sandals. I have three pairs. I do have a shoes for special occasions. :D
Sandals keep your feet more warm than shoes in winter I find.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
"Shall we buy one? that new BBC2 channel has clearer pictures but I suppose we'll need a new aerial".
bristolrd1960s.jpg
The buildings at 814 Bristol Road still exist but small television shops soon went out of business when large stores such as Comet opened nearby in the late 1960s
Capture_814.JPG
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
That railway station pic Alan, I don't think Hereford Station was ever that big, I recall travelling from there back to Brum in the late fifties and I think it was only a small station. (I could be wrong)
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
I notice the shop on the right in the top pic in post 2203 has the word 'Co-Operative' on it's front but the shop does not look like a Co-Op so it must have changed before the 1960s.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
That railway station pic Alan, I don't think Hereford Station was ever that big, I recall travelling from there back to Brum in the late fifties and I think it was only a small station. (I could be wrong)
Hello Eric,
I was not suggesting the picture was Hereford, it is quite clearly Snow Hill. I travelled from Hereford a few times myself. My suggestion was that the time of the pic was when she was shedded at Hereford.
 

Eric Gibson

master brummie
Sorry Alan, I misunderstood your post, I wouldn't know Snow Hill, don't think I've ever been inside the station, when we were kids we travelled from Perry Bar or New Street and once I think from Moor Street.
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
I notice the shop on the right in the top pic in post 2203 has the word 'Co-Operative' on it's front but the shop does not look like a Co-Op so it must have changed before the 1960s.
This would presumably have been a TASCOS shop rather than a Birmingham Co-op shop so that would explain differences in style.
 

oldMohawk

master brummie
You are correct David, here is a pic of that Co-op when it was presumably trading.
Tasco on Bristol Rd.jpg
It looks like the shop on the left was not Alex Owen when this photo was taken.
 

Radiorails

master brummie
The pic in post 2203 of Alex Owen, a tv shop as has been mentioned, is set back from the pavement and looks very much like it is a newsagents. In the pic, post 2210, there appears to be another Co-Op two doors further along the street and even possibly a third two doors further on. The vertical patterned shop names suggest it. It was suggested that they did not look look Co-Ops shops and I have some agreement there, .......................
however, I have since discovered that this style shop name was a modern version of TASCOS shop names and the pic in question is sated as in Selly Oak - see Post 4 of the TASCOS thread. (which has got cluttered with BCS pictures).
 
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oldMohawk

master brummie
As previously mentioned the photographs of bomb damage often show people standing on the rubble and in this photo a young lad on the right wearing a baraclava and that lady with the shopping bag must have clambered over the bricks. The place is Elm Tree Road Stirchley at the junction with Charlotte Road where houses were destroyed during a heavy bombing raid on 10 April 1941. Sadly, a father, mother, and their teenage daughter were killed by the bomb.
ElmStreet_Bombing.jpg
image from Shoothill
 
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Astonian

gone but not forgotten
yes old mowhawk
I have to agrre with the othere three lads whom liked your photograph its a sure cracker brillient lets have more of these photographs
best wishes Astonian Alan,,,
 

Radiorails

master brummie
Birmingham's buses were always noted in the past of having good springing. It was not unusual to see BCT buses leaning way over especially in suburban areas where there were many roundabouts and "U" turns on dual carriageways. However, we do have some former drivers here so maybe they will clarify my comments. Travelling out of the city on the 29A was always a good ride (well people didn't dine on buses quite the way they seem to today) the Mermaid roundabout, Sarehole Road roundabout and the turn around that very large tree (now gone I believe) as the bus turned into Keddleston Road ( I have known the platform to scrape the road there - yes true!) was always interesting. I believe passengers today might complain! An interesting feature of the island at Baldwins Lane, for buses returning to the city, was the compulsory stop half way around the island. This was to slow the bus (well a compulsory stop meant a stop, even if brief) and of course to give the driver chance to see passing cars which did not use the island.
 

Astonian

gone but not forgotten
Hi Alan
I have to agree on the sarold round about its a little blinder with its self even today Alan
I come from worcestershire most days aweek to get to the business we run up at kings road tysely
and i come up over the licky hill and down to the big pub by gloverly road thats one as well
i come that way to avoid the M5 , its a real night mare
best wishes Astonian,,,,, Alan,,,
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
I have seen the bus platform scrape the road on the turn from Hill Street into Paradise Street and obviously the bus was not travelling very fast on that turn
 

Bob Davis

Bob Davis
I have seen the bus platform scrape the road on the turn from Hill Street into Paradise Street and obviously the bus was not travelling very fast on that turn
In a lot of the pictures of the pre war buses, when looking at the rear view, the platform often has a degree of downward slope on it and yes Hill Street into Paradise Street was a favourite for the scraping platform and of course the 'stick' of commuters leaving while the bus was still going round that corner. I am afraid the joys of bus travel...the run and jump on, the drop off before the stop...have long gone, now you ring the bell (a mortal sin in the 1950s, especially if you were with the fierce but lovely Irish Conductress out of Wellhead Lane on her beloved 1749) and sit, wait until the bus stops, then slowly get off, except me. I still get up press the bell as I walk to the front of the bus and stand behind the demarcation line (of course). That bus is going a fair speed, but isn't it a superb picture?

Bob
 

DavidGrain

master brummie
Interesting film about testing buses from 1957 here:
I have watched a demonstration of the tilt test on a bus when they allowed the bus to fall over and then demonstrated lifting it upright again. This took place on a visit that I made to the London Transport Museum Depot in Acton. The only thing that was not accurate about it was that for the purpose of the demonstration they had removed the engine. It was obviously a bus that was due for scrapping and this was demonstration only.
 
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